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Rezensionen verfasst von
Noah Stein ( (Connecticut, USA)

Seite: 1
The Art of Computer Programming 1. Fundamental Algorithms (Kluwer International Series in)
The Art of Computer Programming 1. Fundamental Algorithms (Kluwer International Series in)
von Donald Ervin Knuth
  Gebundene Ausgabe
Preis: EUR 41,92

4 von 4 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Excellent book for learning fundamental algorithms well., 15. August 1999
I read this book when I was a sophomore in high school and I thought it was excellent. Prior to reading the book, I had wanted for a long time to write a program to evaluate standard mathematical expressions. I had even tried once before, but I didn't know enough about what I was doing to be really successful. Somewhere in the second chapter in a discussion of lists, doubly-linked-lists, and binary trees, a good solution came to me, and I implemented it right after I finished reading the book. It worked very well. This book helped me to accomplish the major goal-project of my computer programming career so far, and I definately think it is worth reading for anyone wanting a really advanced understanding of fundamental algorithms. Now I know to many advanced means total [over]use of fully encapsulated C++ objects, which this book doesn't have, but this book gives an advanced understanding, which is infinitely more valuable than classes. If you understand OOP and you understand this book, you should be able to combine the two just fine. Lastly, I'd like to comment on the use of MIX. I read almost none of the MIX assembly code when I read this book. The little I looked at I looked at because I wanted to see what assembly was like in the 60's. But you can understand everything he's trying to say by his explanations of the algorithms, the assembly code is only for clarification, and you don't have to read it. I also believe that everyone who's been using fully encapsulated classes for their entire programming career should learn an assembly language sometime. Just like this book, it will teach you how to think.

Seite: 1