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Uncommon Wisdom: True Tales of What Our Lives as Doctors Have Taught Us about Love, Faith, and Healing
Uncommon Wisdom: True Tales of What Our Lives as Doctors Have Taught Us about Love, Faith, and Healing
von John E. Castaldo
  Gebundene Ausgabe
Preis: EUR 14,18

5.0 von 5 Sternen Give This Book To Your Distracted Doctor, 4. August 2010
Skeptical of the quality of U.S. health care as you are nudged onto the conveyor belt of HMO-assigned (Health Maintenance Org) General Practitioner then GP-referred Specialist when you are in pain with no clear diagnosis? Does the packed waiting room and a Specialist with approximately less than ten minutes to spend with you and no electronic medical history available for review discourage you? Sympathetic with the demands being placed on doctors who may appear more distracted and less likely to form any sort of familiar bond with a regular patient these days and who now have to become their own bookkeepers, filing clerks, health insurance sub-contractors and pre-emptive strike legal tacticians? Bring this ice-breaker of a book by Drs Castaldo & Levitt with you to your next appointment and gift it to your harried doctor.

I did, with my Orthopaedic Doctor in northwestern Oregon and it certainly changed the relationship. My doctor may not have had any more time to spend with me or any other patient in his assembly line HMO practice, but I definitely gauged a finer degree of attention and it also opened up a personal dimension in follow-up consultations & exams. The case studies offered in this book's precursor, THE MAN WITH THE IRON TATTOO and the three gripping additional case studies added to this edition well illustrate the benefits of reverse mentoring and active mentoree-ing. Dr. Castaldo is most direct in his specific citation and crediting of the nursing staff at Lehigh Valley Hospital in a very exciting new chapter titled "Cool Awakening." Dr Castaldo limns the hands-on role of Stroke Research Nurse Claranne Mathiesen in developing and testing a new technology to help with the race against the clock from the Emergency Room (real time) perspective of saving vital organ function after a stroke. This chapter makes for as exciting a read as the most skillful cinematic action adventure sequence ever filmed. It helps to learn enough about the players in this life and death cycle to care as much as we do about how it turns out. The ongoing benefits provided by this particular apparatus and how it came into use would make for a great Gizmo documentary.

Dr. Levitt offers his own reverse mentoring\active mentoree-ing case histories showing how learning to listen to his patients, support staff and respect his wife Eva's own carefully cultivated and highly disciplined observational and critical thinking skills, too often reduced if not entirely dismissed as 'woman's intuition' can be among the most important elements of any physician's continuing education. Dr. Levitt's emotionally wrenching chapters recalling his internship at Bellevue Hospital in New York in the late 1960's and his near wash-out before being blessed with his own mentors, generously and personally recalled, that helped him establish a nearly 40 year practice, much of it in partnership with Dr. Castaldo at Lehigh Valley Hospital in Allentown, PA provides a peek into the vulnerabilities of these High Priests of the Modern Age. Another stunner of a new chapter titled "Chance Encounters" describes the fateful and circuitous route taken by Dr. Levitt's son Marc to his current position at Cincinnati Children's Hospital. Dr. Marc Levitt came under the mentorship of Dr. Alberto Pena, who pioneered in Mexico a Pediatric surgical technique that has had a disproportionate impact on providing children of poverty level families in the developing world as well as here in the land of plenty a new lease on a normal life after horror-filled years due to a particular type of deformity.

Dr. Castaldo's own family's vulnerabilities in the face of life's unforseen medical challenges, see "Sitting With David" and his community-centered perspective in "The Boy In A Giant Man's Body" bring these vivid illustrations home in ways that cannot leave a reader unchanged. The latter case should be required reading for anyone entering the debate on the use of steroids in high school sports and the parenting choices that need to be made as the Life Sciences Industry provides all manner of new tools for the ambitious. In short, a terrific antidote for anyone cocky enough to think they've got life's toughest challenges figured out, while also offering inspiration to those of us who feel overwhelmed or underprepared to deal with the day to day. Dr. M. Scott Peck broke similar faith vs. reason ground 20 years ago with his book of case studies of "evil children" titled PEOPLE OF THE LIE. Here, Drs Castaldo and Levitt have broken new ground with UNCOMMON WISDOM wherein the high stakes wrestling match between faith vs. reason is waged by "People of the Truth."


Zoo Zizaro
Zoo Zizaro
Preis: EUR 20,93

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5.0 von 5 Sternen MC DJ Chintzy Schmaltz KBOO Portland Found Beluga Gems, 4. August 2010
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Zoo Zizaro (Audio CD)
Have to hand it to MC DJ Chintzy Schmaltz of Portland, Oregon's community radio station KBOO whose after-midnight Monday into Tuesday wee hours LOUNGE WORLD brought this import to my attention. Given that local record stores (yes, Po'Land still has a coupla three record store\disc shops) don't have any bin-card for this Berlin-based band it was good to have Amazon there to supply.

Chintzy had caught my ear threading des Belugas "Human Loss & Gain" remix of Bajka & Radio Utopia into a provocative set of 'down-tempo, anti-war, broken world, nu jazz' as per the mission of LOUNGE WORLD. Bajka's vocal & lyrics are very well worth puzzling out. Her English fluent and the mix just right with an oh-so-soulful almost Steve Douglas-inspired sax honking accents to Bajka's so-cool it's hot vocal urgency. Since that fateful set last May, Chintzy Schmaltz has played other Bajka cuts from her own BAJKA IN WONDERLAND another import highlight of 2010, with her tracks "The Banker's Fate" and "The Vanishing" as blendt by Chintz into a pastrami on wry commentary of the Anglo-Saxon Banking Collapse, revealing more than any verbose too-late-to-slam-the-barndoor bluster over BBC's The World.

Dese Belugas feature other vocalists including the precise Ana Luca and long-gone Oakland Blues thrush Brenda Boykin doing a delightful distaff Cab Calloway turn on the title track "Zoo Zizaro" as well as lending East Bay soul to this otherwise Global cartel {almost the kinda terminally ironic Euro-malaise scene Stew lampoons in his autobiographical theater piece now brought to film by Spike Lee in PASSING STRANGE 2009 DVD}. Many more disparate rabbit holes to hip hop into on ZOO ZIZARO. For any barfly or bartender or Rat Pack devotee seeking the perfect blend, dat would be "Clyde Beluga" with the ingredients mixed by male vocalist Feranck Manseed doing a dead-on Frankie Sinatra bada-bada-bing homage. Elsewhere, Manseed appears in very different vocal guise as a 'Backlash Blues' diva under the moniker Nina Someone. Only American group working this biggish band groove is JC Hopkins and Queen Esther of the Biggish Band in Brooklyn, and they haven't put out a new record in 4-5 years.

Get dese Belugas stateside for some gigs...Bring Brenda Boykin back to her East Bay and I-5 corridor fans in the Northwest as conquering Queen of nu jazz soul, glad Berlin could give her what the hipster wanabe fans at KeeSee's Lounge in West Oakland or Troyce Key's old Eli's Mile High Club or Ruthie's Inn on San Pablo could not...Bring Bajka along and whatever a Kitty The Bill is as he\she seems to play a big cat's share of the instruments and has a frisky paw in the arrangements...


The Last Lie
The Last Lie
von Tony Gloeggler
  Taschenbuch
Preis: EUR 16,21

5.0 von 5 Sternen Lean Into The Last Lie, 4. August 2010
Rezension bezieht sich auf: The Last Lie (Taschenbuch)
Not to be confused with the best-selling case studies of child psychiatrist M. Scott Peck's "People of the Lie" except perhaps as a cautionary on the reliability of any narrative titled "The Last Lie", Tony Gloeggler's poetry flaunts irrevocable license and labors under no obligation to be balanced and fair. These are urban vignettes with the tv tuned to Yankee play-by-play and boom box playing classic rock ever bleeding into the foreground dramas of discovery unfolding. This isn't about self-discovery or transformation. The characters in Gloeggler's poems are usually discovering how immutable they are and how unchangeable is their condition.

As he did so compellingly with previous collections of poems "One on One," "One Wish Left" and "My Other Life" (the latter title poem appears here unaltered), Gloeggler keeps the quotidian sufficiently busy, with the narrator's previous and imagined life layers and role-players overlapping so as to heighten the pull at ebb tide when quiet desperation materializes through the broadcast static.

"In my other life\ my father is still alive.\ He saw the best specialists\ and they found a donor\ in time. Insurance covered\ the cost and bill collectors never\ call during dinner. He and mother\ will spend Christmas with us..." This language, clipped in the Donna Reed Show-Make Room for Daddy-Father Knows Best-Leave It To Beaver-Brady Bunch period modality carries the freight of either class frustration or unexamined stasis. Implanted dreams and ambitions are sometimes retrieved and sometimes merely suggested. Not much authenticates the organic dream\ambition from the implanted. Either way an inert trope is left when excised. If not inertia, then some repetitive ghost impulse like tongueing your own gum line after an extraction.

Gloeggler re-shapes this language, elsewhere catching a gust of refreshing irony in his back-hand of the Billy Collins punchline meter that has so successfully become the new American poetic baseline and bassline: "If I was Billy Collins\ I would sit and try\ to write a poem\ nearly every day.\ The opening lines\ might sound like\ neighbors meeting\ on a street corner,\ neighbors who may\ or may not know\ each other's name."

There isn't any of the resentful, if focused attack of, say, poignant Wise Guy poet and hilariously notorious essayist-raconteur Augie Kleinzahler chopping up Garrison Keillor's daily NPR broadcast "The Writer's Almanac" along with the tastes therein being shaped five phlegmatic minutes at an underwritten time.

Nor is there any acknowledgment of those unstuck-in-time moments occasioned in such as Thom Gunn's "Well Dennis O'Grady" where a charmed bus stop encounter with an elderly if vivid neighbor rendered in deftly metered schematic can work cinematically without any ironic inflection. Indeed, Gloeggler's own momentary post 9-11-01 skyline changing epiphany "One Year Later" surmised through his brother's inner eyes transcends the BC formula.

However, unlike a satirist refining moral outrage, the narrator in Gloeggler's poems is more often neither for or against anything.

When it's a He, he's going with the flow, perhaps tossing off a quip or two, always accepting, rarely questioning fate or parsing responsibility. There is no culmination in catharsis, although this is a world as relentlessly driven to narrative resolution as any finely honed homily, rigorously argued essay or subliminally suggestive thirty second commercial spot. Within Gloeggler's most ambitious pieces, like "Crossing," a kinetic clip of an individual a developmentally disabled older group home member soloing at a busy Brooklyn streetcorner, while the hydrant hidden Group Home worker following observes 'Larry' negotiating traffic at the intersection, a fresh view of the everyday is brought into focus, while routine gesture is arranged and transformed into semaphore.

As the New Orleans novelist Walker Percy illustrates through his narrator and autistic child's repetitive 'shtick' in "The Moviegoer" (see the child's craving to be 'Akim'd' as in the scene he's viewed over and over at the movies of The Great McGinty mob 'Fixer' played Boris Badenov-style by Akim Tamaroff tumbling out of the mayor's limousine wrestling with the 'reform candidate' and newly elected office-holder Daniel McGinty) validation for most of us non-notables can come by recognizing our 'hood on the big screen, or sketched into a book. We can feel validated seeing ourselves in the comedy or drama of those we mock or folklorize. Also in the sharing of well-cadenced reaction, say, in a darkened movie house, or in re-enacting totemic pay-off gestures with our friends.

In the sly case of "The Last Lie", validation is implicit in the way Gloeggler slips a frame around perceived sets of signals. Validation is carried through the gestures of any role-player crossing the downstage or upstage of our isolated inner lives. There may be no catharsis, but Gloeggler creates a vibrant world where tension is released whenever any of us can be pressed into service as the signifying monkey in somebody else's life.


Ifili
Ifili
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4.0 von 5 Sternen Amazigh Artist Peeks Behind Arabic Curtain @Native No Africa, 8. Oktober 2003
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Ifili (Audio CD)
There has been precious little Deutsche, Anglo, French or Spanish access via translation to the amazing Amazigh (Berber) bardic tradition of native North Africa. Though the Rough Guide to World Music reference book, through curious journalists like Andy Morgan, have explored the current bumper crop of poetic songwriters and recording artists working in exile (as the native North African Tamazight language is suppressed in all the Arab facade regimes from the Canary Islands, Morocco, Moroccan-occupied Western Sahara clear across to the Libyan-Egyptian border), until this CD by young poet extraordinaire, Yelas, no Deutsche, English, French or Spanish translations of the lyrics have been provided.
Even the assasination in Algeria in 1998 of the 'Berber Bob Dylan' namely Lounes Matoub, did not elicit an international edition of his last CD ALGERIASSIC PARK (aka LETTRE OUVERTE AUX) that would have opened up his scathing lyrical critique of Uncle Colonialism to Germanophones, Anglophones, Espanaphones and Francophones, not to mention Arabophones. Matoub's re-write of the Algerian national anthem would have made the Arabo-Islamist attacks of 09-11 less of a surprise or mystery to those who wonder 'why do they hate us?'.
Spain has been flooded with native North Africans seeking exile from intolerable regimes in Arabized states across the Straits of Gibraltar. Yet, Spanish speakers still see only an indistinguishable mass of Arabo-Islamists, rather than an Amazigh (Berber) majority comprised of mostly secular Muslims who are politically pluralistic and culturally egalitarian, with Moorish roots in the tolerant historical climate of the Andalucian Englightenment. Native North Africans share more in common with western culture than they do with Saudi-financed Arabo-Islamist brainwashing academies and fundamentalist doctrine. Or, as Yelas suggests in his masterful lyrics, with the secular Ba'athist Exclusionist elites who wrote the Algerian National charter identifying anyone who wasn't a Muslim and didn't speak Arabic to be a threat to national unity. When the Algerian national charter was drafted less than 50% of the population had mastered Arabic according to journalist Adel Darwish.
What an eye-opener Yelas' songs will be to the world's skeptics and critics of free-for-all Globalization! What a toe-tapper this will be, as traditional Amazigh (Berber) beats such as 12/8 rhythm merge with a Mediterranean-wide palette of melodic colors (even Celtic airs blowing down from up the Barbary Coast).
Check out the title track "Ifili/The Net" which throws down the gauntlet to Algeria's Arabo-Ba'athist oil elite and Salafist Islamist insurgency alike with this gale-force refrain: "The struggle continues until The Hague/To he who would penetrate our space/The retort will be painful/Let the people know/That we live for our Amazigh culture/Even with our Tamazight tongues cut out."
Yelas' skilled and multi-culti octet draws from the musical traditions of Catalonia, Spain, Greece, Italy and a bit of the polyphonic chorale of Corsica & Sardinia. Yet it his own stormblown Taqbaylith (Kabylian dialect of Tamazight) voice that guides this sojourn through Tamazgha, as native North Africa was known before the Arab invasion and French colonial period that re-instituted the Arab Facade after the retreat of the Ottoman Turks.
Check out Philippe Briegh's Breizgh-Celtic fiddle flourishes, Michel Sikiotakis' airy Aegean flutes, and Tzvika Voltoch's colorful percussion that includes the native North African bendir, or frame drum made with sea-ray skin which carries the delightful buzz of a lightly blown speaker. With the handsome CD booklet and English translations of the poetic and stirring suppressed Tamazight lyrics, this recording is a must for the Manu Chao or serious World Music listener. Wouldn't be a bad dossier for the student activists of International Solidarity to review when sending out their "witnesses" to flashpoints of repression around the globe. With all the oil, gas and uranium, it is a wonder no international activists or journalists ever see sprawling North Africa just over the Mediterranean horizon!


Ifili
Ifili
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Preis: EUR 5,14

4.0 von 5 Sternen Amazigh Artist Peeks Behind Arabic Curtain@Native No Africa, 23. September 2003
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Ifili (Audio CD)
There has been precious little or no Anglo-Saxon access via translation to the amazing Amazigh (Berber) bardic tradition of native North Africa. Though the Rough Guide to World Music reference book, through curious journalists like Andy Morgan, have explored the current bumper crop of poetic songwriters and recording artists working in exile (as the native North African Tamazight language is suppressed in all the Arab facade regimes from the Canary Islands, Morocco, Moroccan-occupied Western Sahara clear across to the Libyan-Egyptian border), until this CD by young poet extraordinaire, Yelas, no Deutsche or English translations of the lyrics have been provided.
Even the assasination in Algeria in 1998 of the 'Berber Bob Dylan' namely Lounes Matoub, did not elicit an international edition of his last CD ALGERIASSIC PARK that would have opened up his scathing lyrical critique of Uncle Colonialism to Anglophones, Deutschophones and the Hispanic World, not to mention Arabophones. Matoub's re-write of the Algerian national anthem would have made the Arabo-Islamist attacks of 09-11 less of a surprise or mystery to those who wonder 'why do they hate us?'.
Spain has been flooded with native North Africans seeking exile from intolerable regimes in Arabized states across the Straits of Gibraltar. Yet, Spanish speakers still see only an indistinguishable mass of Arabo-Islamists, rather than an Amazigh (Berber) majority comprised of mostly secular Muslims who are politically pluralistic and culturally egalitarian, with Moorish roots in the tolerant historical climate of the Andalucian Englightenment. Native North Africans share more in common with western culture than they do with Saudi-financed Arabo-Islamist brainwashing academies and fundamentalist doctrine. Or, as Yelas suggests in his masterful lyrics, with the secular Ba'athist Exclusionist elites who wrote the Algerian National charter identifying anyone who wasn't a Muslim and didn't speak Arabic to be a threat to national unity. When the Algerian national charter was drafted less than 50% of the population had mastered Arabic according to journalist Adel Darwish.
What an eye-opener Yelas' songs will be to the world's skeptics and critics of free-for-all Globalization! What a toe-tapper this will be, as traditional Amazigh (Berber) beats such as 12/8 rhythm merge with a Mediterranean-wide palette of melodic colors (even Celtic airs blowing down from up the Barbary Coast).
Check out the title track "Ifili/The Net" which throws down the gauntlet to Algeria's Arabo-Ba'athist oil elite and Salafist Islamist insurgency alike with this gale-force refrain: "The struggle continues until The Hague/To he who would penetrate our space/The retort will be painful/Let the people know/That we live for our Amazigh culture/Even with our Tamazight tongues cut out."
Yelas' skilled and multi-culti octet draws from the musical traditions of Catalonia, Spain, Greece, Italy and a bit of the polyphonic chorale of Corsica & Sardinia. Yet it his own stormblown Taqbaylith (Kabylian dialect of Tamazight) voice that guides this sojourn through Tamazgha, as native North Africa was known before the Arab invasion and French colonial period that re-instituted the Arab Facade after the retreat of the Ottoman Turks.
Check out Philippe Briegh's Breizgh-Celtic fiddle flourishes, Michel Sikiotakis' airy Aegean flutes, and Tzvika Voltoch's colorful percussion that includes the native North African bendir, or frame drum made with sea-ray skin which carries the delightful buzz of a lightly blown speaker. With the handsome CD booklet and English translations of the poetic and stirring suppressed Tamazight lyrics, this recording is a must for the Manu Chao or serious World Music listener. Wouldn't be a bad dossier for the student activists of International Solidarity to review when sending out their "witnesses" to flashpoints of repression around the globe. With all the oil, gas and uranium, it is a wonder no international activists or journalists ever see sprawling North Africa just over the Mediterranean horizon!


Ifili
Ifili
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Preis: EUR 5,14

4.0 von 5 Sternen Amazigh Artist Peeks Behind Arabic Curtain@Native No Africa, 12. September 2003
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Ifili (Audio CD)
There has been precious little or no Anglo (or Basque, Breizh, Catalunian, Danish, Deutsche, Dutch, Espanol, Finnish, Francaise, Gaelic, Greek, Itali, Norwegian, Portuguese, Sami or Sverige) access via translation to the amazing Amazigh (Berber) bardic tradition of native North Africa. Though the Rough Guide to World Music reference book, through curious journalists like Andy Morgan, have explored the current bumper crop of poetic songwriters and recording artists working in exile (as the native North African Tamazight language is suppressed in all the Arab facade regimes from the Canary Islands, Morocco, Moroccan-occupied Western Sahara clear across to the Libyan-Egyptian border), until this CD by young poet extraordinaire, Yelas, no translations of the lyrics have been provided.
Even the assasination in Algeria in 1998 of the 'Berber Bob Dylan' namely Lounes Matoub, did not elicit an international edition of his last CD ALGERIASSIC PARK that would have opened up his scathing lyrical critique of Uncle Colonialism to Anglophones, Germanophones and Francophones, not to mention Arabophones. Matoub's re-write of the Algerian national anthem would have made the Arabo-Islamist attacks of 09-11 less of a surprise or mystery to those who wonder 'why do they hate us?'.
Spain has been flooded with native North Africans seeking exile from intolerable regimes in Arabized states across the Straits of Gibraltar. Yet, Spanish speakers still see only an indistinguishable mass of Arabo-Islamists, rather than an Amazigh (Berber) majority comprised of mostly secular Muslims who are politically pluralistic and culturally egalitarian, with Moorish roots in the tolerant historical climate of the Andalucian Englightenment. Native North Africans share more in common with western culture than they do with Saudi-financed Arabo-Islamist brainwashing academies and fundamentalist doctrine. Or, as Yelas suggests in his masterful lyrics, with the secular Ba'athist Exclusionist elites who wrote the Algerian National charter identifying anyone who wasn't a Muslim and didn't speak Arabic to be a threat to national unity. When the Algerian national charter was drafted less than 50% of the population had mastered Arabic according to journalist Adel Darwish.
What an eye-opener Yelas' songs will be to the world's skeptics and critics of free-for-all Globalization! What a toe-tapper this will be, as traditional Amazigh (Berber) beats such as 12/8 rhythm merge with a Mediterranean-wide palette of melodic colors (even Celtic airs blowing down from up the Barbary Coast).
Check out the title track "Ifili/The Net" which throws down the gauntlet to Algeria's Arabo-Ba'athist oil elite and Salafist Islamist insurgency alike with this gale-force refrain: "The struggle continues until The Hague/To he who would penetrate our space/The retort will be painful/Let the people know/That we live for our Amazigh culture/Even with our Tamazight tongues cut out."
Yelas' skilled and multi-culti octet draws from the musical traditions of Catalonia, Spain, Greece, Italy and a bit of the polyphonic chorale of Corsica & Sardinia. Yet it his own stormblown Taqbaylith (Kabylian dialect of Tamazight) voice that guides this sojourn through Tamazgha, as native North Africa was known before the Arab invasion and French colonial period that re-instituted the Arab Facade after the retreat of the Ottoman Turks.
Check out Philippe Briegh's Breizgh-Celtic fiddle flourishes, Michel Sikiotakis' airy Aegean flutes, and Tzvika Voltoch's colorful percussion that includes the native North African bendir, or frame drum made with sea-ray skin which carries the delightful buzz of a lightly blown speaker. With the handsome CD booklet and English translations of the poetic and stirring suppressed Tamazight lyrics, this recording is a must for the Manu Chao or serious World Music listener. Wouldn't be a bad dossier for the student activists of International Solidarity to review when sending out their "witnesses" to flashpoints of repression around the globe. With all the oil, gas and uranium, it is a wonder no international activists or journalists ever see sprawling North Africa just over the Mediterranean horizon!


#8 (1983) [Vinyl LP]
#8 (1983) [Vinyl LP]

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5.0 von 5 Sternen Darkest..Bleakest Work of A Dark & Bleak Player, 3. September 2003
Rezension bezieht sich auf: #8 (1983) [Vinyl LP] (Vinyl)
Made during the Reagan-Bush trickledown years as homelessness in the USA was being normalized and the national debt run up on a black budget of Afghani heroin and Contra crack pipelining into U.S. cities, this is the darkest and bleakest album by an artist that never would've been mistaken for a party boy anyway.
For nuanced guitar listeners Richard Thompson is credited on the sessions, but it turns out from the outtakes that appear on the recent ANYWAY THE WIND BLOWS: J.J. CALE ANTHOLOGY that Thompson's most signature guitar sounds intertwined with Cale's slithery lines on "Santa Cruz," and that wound up on #8's cutting room floor.
Cale and his core group of players; Christine Lakeland (co-writing some of the best stuff here, and singing counter vocal on their collaboration "Money Talks"), Jim Karstein the "rhythm fool" cited verbally and on the backbeat during the death-defying blues-scale-climbing-&-a'plummeting "Takin' Care of Bidnet," Jim Keltner on trashcans, and Spooner Oldham's deep groovin' Muscle Shoals organ charcoal in some shades of black & blues America rarely sees in the mass media mirror.
"Hard Times," "Unemployment" and the existential marvel in so few words & chords that makes my marrow run on "Living Here Too" are just a few of the reasons to go back to this album when the cost of hanging on doesn't seem worth any slim benefits on offer. But then, why believe me? As so sharply picked out on steelstrings that Cale works in his hands like a hitman cat's cradling piano wire behind a mark's neck, "You can talk to a pauper/You can talk to a prince/You can talk to a preacher/Or the President/Some people lie.../People lie...ya see?/They say one thing/And mean something else completely...."
Rumor has it Cale and his mates also cut a lengthy instrumental jam of Ray Charles's "Hit The Road, Jack" for this album, but the record company left it off. Too bad, as my only complaint is the short running time of the album, the poor Nashville filler of Paul Craft's "Teardrops In My Tequila," and no bonus tracks added to the CD reissue. Cale took a 6 year break from the 'bidnet' after this record was done. This was our real 1984, not Orwell's fiction....


Ifili
Ifili
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Preis: EUR 5,14

4.0 von 5 Sternen Amazigh Artist Peeks Behind Arabic Curtain@Native No Africa, 3. September 2003
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Ifili (Audio CD)
There has been precious little or no Deutsche, Anglo, French, Greek, Italian or Portuguese/Spanish access via translation to the amazing Amazigh (Berber) bardic tradition of native North Africa. Though the Rough Guide to World Music reference book, through curious journalists like Andy Morgan, have explored the current bumper crop of poetic songwriters and recording artists working in exile (as the native North African Tamazight language is suppressed in all the Arab facade regimes from the Canary Islands, Morocco, Moroccan-occupied Western Sahara clear across to the Libyan-Egyptian border), until this CD by young poet extraordinaire, Yelas, no English translations of the lyrics have been provided.
Even the assasination in Algeria in 1998 of the 'Berber Bob Dylan' namely Lounes Matoub, did not elicit an international edition of his last CD ALGERIASSIC PARK that would have opened up his scathing lyrical critique of Uncle Colonialism to Anglophones, Germanophones and Francophones, not to mention Arabophones. Matoub's re-write of the Algerian national anthem would have made the Arabo-Islamist attacks of 09-11 less of a surprise or mystery to those who wonder 'why do they hate us?'.
Spain has been flooded with native North Africans seeking exile from intolerable regimes in Arabized states across the Straits of Gibraltar. Yet, Spanish speakers still see only an indistinguishable mass of Arabo-Islamists, rather than an Amazigh (Berber) majority comprised of mostly secular Muslims who are politically pluralistic and culturally egalitarian, with Moorish roots in the tolerant historical climate of the Andalucian Englightenment. Native North Africans share more in common with western culture than they do with Saudi-financed Arabo-Islamist brainwashing academies and fundamentalist doctrine. Or, as Yelas suggests in his masterful lyrics, with the secular Ba'athist Exclusionist elites who wrote the Algerian National charter identifying anyone who wasn't a Muslim and didn't speak Arabic to be a threat to national unity. When the Algerian national charter was drafted less than 50% of the population had mastered Arabic according to journalist Adel Darwish.
What an eye-opener Yelas' songs will be to the world's skeptics and critics of free-for-all Globalization! What a toe-tapper this will be, as traditional Amazigh (Berber) beats such as 12/8 rhythm merge with a Mediterranean-wide palette of melodic colors (even Celtic airs blowing down from up the Barbary Coast).
Check out the title track "Ifili/The Net" which throws down the gauntlet to Algeria's Arabo-Ba'athist oil elite and Salafist Islamist insurgency alike with this gale-force refrain: "The struggle continues until The Hague/To he who would penetrate our space/The retort will be painful/Let the people know/That we live for our Amazigh culture/Even with our Tamazight tongues cut out."
Yelas' skilled and multi-culti octet draws from the musical traditions of Catalonia, Spain, Greece, Italy and a bit of the polyphonic chorale of Corsica & Sardinia. Yet it his own stormblown Taqbaylith (Kabylian dialect of Tamazight) voice that guides this sojourn through Tamazgha, as native North Africa was known before the Arab invasion and French colonial period that re-instituted the Arab Facade after the retreat of the Ottoman Turks.
Check out Philippe Briegh's Breizgh-Celtic fiddle flourishes, Michel Sikiotakis' airy Aegean flutes, and Tzvika Voltoch's colorful percussion that includes the native North African bendir, or frame drum made with sea-ray skin which carries the delightful buzz of a lightly blown speaker. With the handsome CD booklet and English translations of the poetic and stirring suppressed Tamazight lyrics, this recording is a must for the Manu Chao or serious World Music listener. Wouldn't be a bad dossier for the student activists of International Solidarity to review when sending out their "witnesses" to flashpoints of repression around the globe. With all the oil, gas and uranium, it is a wonder no international activists or journalists ever see sprawling North Africa just over the Mediterranean horizon!


Nr.8
Nr.8
Preis: EUR 10,98

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5.0 von 5 Sternen Darkest..Bleakest Work of A Dark & Bleak Player, 7. November 2002
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Nr.8 (Audio CD)
Made during the Reagan-Bush trickledown years as homelessness in the USA was being normalized and the national debt run up on a black budget of Afghani heroin and Contra crack pipelining into U.S. cities, this is the darkest and bleakest album by an artist that never would've been mistaken for a party boy anyway.
For nuanced guitar listeners Richard Thompson is credited on the sessions, but it turns out from the outtakes that appear on the recent ANYWAY THE WIND BLOWS: J.J. CALE ANTHOLOGY that Thompson's most signature guitar sounds intertwined with Cale's slithery lines on "Santa Cruz," and that wound up on #8's cutting room floor.
Cale and his core group of players; Christine Lakeland (co-writing some of the best stuff here, and singing counter vocal on their collaboration "Money Talks"), Jim Karstein the "rhythm fool" cited verbally and on the backbeat during the death-defying blues-scale-climbing-&-a'plummeting "Takin' Care of Bidnet," Jim Keltner on trashcans, and Spooner Oldham's deep groovin' Muscle Shoals organ charcoal in some shades of black & blues America rarely sees in the mass media mirror.
"Hard Times," "Unemployment" and the existential marvel in so few words & chords that makes my marrow run on "Living Here Too" are just a few of the reasons to go back to this album when the cost of hanging on doesn't seem worth any slim benefits on offer. But then, why believe me? As so sharply picked out on steelstrings that Cale works in his hands like a hitman cat's cradling piano wire behind a mark's neck, "You can talk to a pauper/You can talk to a prince/You can talk to a preacher/Or the President/Some people lie.../People lie...ya see?/They say one thing/And mean something else completely...."
Rumor has it Cale and his mates also cut a lengthy instrumental jam of Ray Charles's "Hit The Road, Jack" for this album, but the record company left it off. Too bad, as my only complaint is the ...poor Nashville filler of Paul Craft's "Teardrops In My Tequila," and the short running time of the vinyl, with no bonus tracks added to the CD reissue. Cale took a 6 year break from the 'bidnet' after this record was done. This was our real 1984, not Orwell's fiction....


After Thelong Night + Playing
After Thelong Night + Playing

4.0 von 5 Sternen Amateur Vocalist Coaxes Acoustic Pros To Dig Deep, 31. Oktober 2002
Rezension bezieht sich auf: After Thelong Night + Playing (Audio CD)
The liner notes of this first time CD edition of two mid-80's vinyl albums from folk vocalist Loren Auerbach explain how this memorable collaboration with Bert Jansch led on a winding path through the intervening years to recent marriage. One can hear sparks of muses co-mingling betwixt the German & Icelandic poetry graduate student-turned-unsteady-vocalist and the diving swallow grace notes of Jansch's steelstring guitar. Most of the material is written by producer Richard Newman, and is very nearly up to the quality of Jansch's handful of originals that reflect depths he'd never had a chance to show on his previous repertoire of English Isles folk standards.
This is clearly a very personal project, and I feel the intimacy and emotional risk every time I play the feverish songs, which has been often during this past rainy season.
The song that haunts me deeper each time I hear it is "Give Me Love." It would be on any tape I'd blend to commune with beauty being approached slowly, or held at a distance. It's visceral power recalls Wendy Waldman's torch ballad "Mad Mad Me", and Auerbach's far less agile voicing makes me wish other vocalists would try recording "Give Me Love" without changing the simple arrangement. Hope Sandoval of Mazzy Star has been recording of late with Jansch, and her breathey sensual approach and huskier vocal timbre might draw some luster from the song's facets. It'd be intriguing to hear whether a male vocalist could handle the surrender to yearning limned by "Give Me Love", but after hearing Danny O'Keefe's arcing glissando on his recently released "Pieces of the Rain" I find myself wanting to hear these two songs threaded together through an extended suite grounded in a "Bolero" cadence of hypnotic attraction.
Other songs that blossom with occasional cello to add some body behind Auerbach's edgy voice include "Is It Real?", "Christabel", "Carousel" (where Jansch's guitar takes up all the slack), and the powerful closing set of "So Lonely" and "The Miller."
These 15 tracks amount to a well-realized project by an artist who seems to have left performing behind. I'd be interested in hearing Loren Auerbach try her hand at collaborating with Jansch on some of her own verse, or the German Literature she studies and teaches along with the Icelandic mythic stuff that the liner notes say she translates.


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