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Rain
Rain
von Kirsty Gunn
  Taschenbuch
Preis: EUR 8,30

1.0 von 5 Sternen disappointing, 27. Juli 2013
Verifizierter Kauf(Was ist das?)
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Rain (Taschenbuch)
very disappointed with this book - primarily the prose & style just weren't my thing: lots of words not really saying anything and flowery but far from beautiful; the style was elliptical at best and jumped back and forth pointlessly. It was pretty clear from the start what was going to happen, but it took a long time getting there - and then when she has something to tell, she beats around the bush leaving (for me at least) a lot to be desired. As a short(er) story it could have been quite powerful, but unfortunately it just meandered along for too long.


Once Were Warriors
Once Were Warriors
von Alan Duff
  Taschenbuch
Preis: EUR 10,20

3.0 von 5 Sternen interesting story / difficult style, 4. März 2013
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Once Were Warriors (Taschenbuch)
I found this book quite hard work due to the author's style - sure he uses slang and colloquialisms to try to put across the "kinda fullas" were reading about - but his voice isn't consistent and doesn't help the story telling. The story is quite interesting (albeit sad and brutal), but the author takes a long time telling it. That said, some parts are well written (chapter 10 I thought was brilliant), but most of the book is long-winded and slow moving - and can be confusing with all the mixed-up interior monologue. Hard to know how much of an insight this is into Maori "slums" - but as seen as the author is 1/2 Maori and grew up in Rotorua (two-lakes), there are no doubt some autobiographical elements. Finally: If you can deal with the style, worth having a go.


God's Own Country
God's Own Country
von Ross Raisin
  Taschenbuch
Preis: EUR 10,87

3.0 von 5 Sternen OK, 14. August 2012
Rezension bezieht sich auf: God's Own Country (Taschenbuch)
Although I quite enjoyed reading this book set in the Yorkshire Moors, it didn't really offer any surprises: it was more or less clear from the beginning what would happen. The style and the dialect were both well implemented, although from the content of the book I was reminded of John Fowles' THE COLLECTOR. An interesting insight into the mind of rather warped 19-year-old -- and coming from Yorkshire myself, it was nice to have the Moors and regionalisms described so well. So, all in all an enjoyable read but could have done with more suspense and unexpected turns


Die Rache der Schlangen
Die Rache der Schlangen
von Fakir Baykurt
  Gebundene Ausgabe

5.0 von 5 Sternen Fantastisch, 4. Juli 2012
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Die Rache der Schlangen (Gebundene Ausgabe)
ein gelungenes und interessantes Buch ' der Stil ist sehr klar, die Charaktere sehr glaubwürdig und nicht immer einfach gut oder böse. Ich fand die viele Geschichten sehr spannend. Es ist auch ein Einblick in das Dorfleben der Türkei der Vergangenheit.


This Silence Kills
This Silence Kills
Preis: EUR 7,29

6 von 17 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
1.0 von 5 Sternen nix sagend, 19. Mai 2012
Rezension bezieht sich auf: This Silence Kills (Audio CD)
mit THIS SILENCE KILLS kann ich leider nichts anfangen: ihre quietsch-mädchen Stimme gefällt mir nicht und die Lieder finde ich ziemlich schwach und langweilig - sie entwickeln sich nicht und die lyrics sind sehr simpel. ich habe gehofft, die Platte wird mir irgendwann gefallen ... aber leider nicht.
Kommentar Kommentare (2) | Kommentar als Link | Neuester Kommentar: Dec 27, 2013 7:37 PM CET


Artwizz PowerPlug 2 Mini-USB-Ladegerät für iPod, iPhone und MP3-Player weiß
Artwizz PowerPlug 2 Mini-USB-Ladegerät für iPod, iPhone und MP3-Player weiß

0 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen tut alles was er tun soll, 19. November 2011
Verifizierter Kauf(Was ist das?)
was kann man sagen? total praktisch (und -preis-günstig) um dein ipod usw ohne Rechner aufzuladen (vor allem wenn man unterwegs ist oder der Rechner nicht an ist). Lädt schnell und problemlos. Super


Sterntaler Fuchs Filou Mini Spieluhr Tier 17cm 62023
Sterntaler Fuchs Filou Mini Spieluhr Tier 17cm 62023

1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen schön aber . . ., 19. November 2011
= Haltbarkeit:4.0 von 5 Sternen  = Spaßfaktor:3.0 von 5 Sternen  = Pädagogisch wertvoll:2.0 von 5 Sternen 
der Fuchs ist ganz schön und gut gemacht, die Melodie (ist leider nur die 1. Strophe des Lieds) klingt gut aber die Spielzeit ist nur sehr kurz und die letzte Note der Melodie kommt nie! Schade

- inzwischen (2 Jahre später) funktioniert die Uhr kaum noch - also nur ein kurzes Leben, leider


The Continuum Concept (Arkana)
The Continuum Concept (Arkana)
von Jean Liedloff
  Taschenbuch
Preis: EUR 11,80

3 von 9 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
1.0 von 5 Sternen Everything you know is wrong, 13. Mai 2010
Rezension bezieht sich auf: The Continuum Concept (Arkana) (Taschenbuch)
Liedloff, no doubt, wrote this book as a much needed radical diversion from the 'modern' methods of bringing up babies in the 60s and 70s.

Unfortunately, it reads like she is shouting - and she is shouting out opinionated and unfounded socio-waffle (for want of a better word). This may have fallen on hungry ears in the 70s, but not so today.

One can't help but feeling she sees only positive things in the way of the Yequana (a tropical rain forest tribe in Venezuela) and only negative in the Western/civilised culture. For example, when a Yequana child is injured, she praises the mother's coolness - why not see this as disregard for the child's well-being? She attempts to starkly contrast the two cultures, but not all babies/parents are as she describes and so paints a very false picture by presuming to know how we are and how we see ourselves (one wonders if she sees herself like this).

There are, of course, vast cultural differences between the Yequana and the West, but many of the Yequana's child-caring methods find easy parallels with Western upbringing: she describes in detail the happy children of the Yequana - but if we change the canoes for bicycles and the bow and arrows for footballs, it is not much different from a description of children in the West.

Many parts of the book are rather hard to accept: she criticises praise; states that children have (fatal) accidents simply because that is what adults expect of them (a parent says 'you're going to drop that plate' and the child drops the plate); and shows a complete misunderstanding of homosexuality which could easily be seen as homophobic! She even goes on to explain that a child will release pent up energy via masturbation (is she writing about babies or teenagers?).

She writes 'if one wants to know what is correct for any species, one must know the inherent expectations of that species'. And from reading the book, one feels that Liedloff believes she knows!
Far too often, the books reads as if written by a psychotherapist looking for one thing which causes all problems: the deprivation of the 'in-arms' experience. She presumes that carrying babies is the reason for the differences between the Yequana and civilised culture; that when not deprived of expected experiences one has a happy folk; that Easterners are less deprived (of in-arms experience) than the average Westerner and therefore have more serenity! She is believes that the Yequana live in real joy but that we (Westerners) do not. All of this is completely unfounded. Nevertheless, she is convinced her continuum theory is best - and yet she can't (or won't) explain why one group of Indians is peaceful and another is aggressive.

She does realise that it is unrealistic to change our culture to another - but unfortunately only because we are the 'wrong' sort of people. There is a course a vastly differently social structure: the 'civilised' world is lacking the advantages of tribal unity - we have only compact family-focused groups which are often not even together - and this causes deprivation for both children and parents.

But what is the central message of the book?

She is against overprotecting a child but all for keeping it close and loved and, primarily, in doing what feels right or natural or instinctive. In essence: hold your baby. There is some good practical advice in the last chapter and one can happily surmise that a child is part of our life and should not be separated from it. But this sound advice is so heavily burdened with the rest of the book, that it is hard to appreciate.


The Continuum Concept: In Search of Happiness Lost (Classics in Human Development)
The Continuum Concept: In Search of Happiness Lost (Classics in Human Development)
von Jean Liedloff
  Taschenbuch
Preis: EUR 9,48

2 von 3 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
1.0 von 5 Sternen Everything you know is wrong, 13. Mai 2010
Verifizierter Kauf(Was ist das?)
Liedloff, no doubt, wrote this book as a much needed radical diversion from the 'modern' methods of bringing up babies in the 60s and 70s.

Unfortunately, it reads like she is shouting - and she is shouting out opinionated and unfounded socio-waffle (for want of a better word). This may have fallen on hungry ears in the 70s, but not so today.

One can't help but feeling she sees only positive things in the way of the Yequana (a tropical rain forest tribe in Venezuela) and only negative in the Western/civilised culture. For example, when a Yequana child is injured, she praises the mother's coolness - why not see this as disregard for the child's well-being? She attempts to starkly contrast the two cultures, but not all babies/parents are as she describes and so paints a very false picture by presuming to know how we are and how we see ourselves (one wonders if she sees herself like this).

There are, of course, vast cultural differences between the Yequana and the West, but many of the Yequana's child-caring methods find easy parallels with Western upbringing: she describes in detail the happy children of the Yequana - but if we change the canoes for bicycles and the bow and arrows for footballs, it is not much different from a description of children in the West.

Many parts of the book are rather unbelievable: she criticises praise, states that children have (fatal) accidents simply because that is what adults expect of them, that we only have recreation in order to realise ourselves and shows a complete misunderstanding of homosexuality which could easily be seen as homophobic! She is convinced that the Yequana live in real joy but that we do not. That a child will release pent up energy via masturbation (is she writing about babies or teenagers?).

She writes 'if one wants to know what is correct for any species, one must know the inherent expectations of that species'. And from reading the book, one feels that Liedloff believes she knows!
Far too often, the books reads as if written by a psychotherapist looking for one thing which causes all problems: the deprivation of the 'in-arms' experience. She presumes that carrying babies is the reason for the differences between the Yequana and civilised culture; that when not deprived of expected experiences one has a happy folk; that Easterners are less deprived (of in-arms experience) than the average Westerner and therefore have more serenity! All of this is completely unfounded and unbelievable. She is convinced her continuum theory is best. Yet she can't explain why one group of Indians is peaceful and another is aggressive.

She does realise that it is unrealistic to change our culture to another as we are the 'wrong' sort of people. There is a course a vastly differently social structure: the 'civilised' world is lacking the advantages tribal unity - we have only compact family-focused groups which of often not even together - and this causes deprivation for both children and parents.

But what is the central message?

She is against overprotecting a child but all for keeping it close and loved and, primarily, in doing what feels right or natural or instinctive. In essence: hold your baby. There is some good practical advice in the last chapter and one can happily surmise that a child is part of our life and should not be separated from it.

But this sound advice is so heavily burdened with the rest of the book, that it is hard to appreciate.


Frankenstein: Or, the Modern Prometheus (Wordsworth Collection)
Frankenstein: Or, the Modern Prometheus (Wordsworth Collection)
von Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley
  Taschenbuch

1 von 5 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
1.0 von 5 Sternen Failed Attempt; or the prolonged Prometheus, 3. März 2010
What begins as a possibly interesting book (and the basic story - a man creates a being which rebels against him - is appealing) turns into a long-winded epistolary novel: Robert Walton writes to his sister of his journey to the North Pole during which he meets Victor Frankenstein who in turn recalls his life story, the story of creating a so-called "daemon" who also goes on to tell not only his story but that of a family he lived near. The form is not particularly well executed and even contains complete letters.

The style is rather naive and one feels Shelley has simply looked up alternative words in a thesaurus and used them regardless of their suitability.

The story is convoluted, full of unbelievable coincidences and verbose - although one should perhaps take into account that the book was first published in 1818. Surprisingly enough, the "monster" is created and disappears again within just a few pages.

The characters are shallow and it is hard to sympathise with the character of Victor Frankenstein - moreover one feels more compassion for the monster he has created.

What was initially to be a short story should have really stayed that way. The expansion to a novel has, in my opinion, made the story tiresome and weak.

All-in-all, this is not a book I would ever recommend: discursive and painfully prolonged.


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