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Flourish: A New Understanding of Happiness and Well-Being - and How to Achieve Them
Flourish: A New Understanding of Happiness and Well-Being - and How to Achieve Them
von Martin E. P. Seligman
  Taschenbuch
Preis: EUR 20,50

13 von 15 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Die neue Wissenschaft des Wohlbefindens, 21. Mai 2011
Wahrscheinlich wird dieses Buch ein neues Standardwerk der Positiven Psychologie.

Positive psychology has come to be defined as "the scientific study of what enables individuals and communities to thrive". "Flourish" explores this concept of thriving. The last 15 years, Martin Seligman has been one of the major driving forces behind positive psychology. He has authored influential bestsellers such as Der Glücks-Faktor: Warum Optimisten länger leben / "Authentic Happiness" (2002). Now, again about a decade later, Seligman writes a new account of what he has been teaching and telling on conferences lately. He does so in a somewhat peculiar mix: a) a manifesto for a broad science of well-being, b) accounts of positive psychology research and practice, interlaced with c) a backstage history of positive psychology.

a) First of all, "Flourish" is a manifesto for a science of well-being. Seligman departs from his earlier "Authentic Happiness" concept and posits the broader topic of "well-being". "Authentic happiness" comprised three components: 1. positive emotion (feeling good), 2. engagement (flow) and 3. meaning. Seligman now adds two more components of well-being: 4. positive relationships and 5. accomplishment. To my humble opinion, the addition of 4. positive relationships is long overdue, whereas the addition of 5. accomplishment may turn out to be controversial.

b) Next, this book gives several examples of well-being research. Don't expect yet another pop self-help peptalk of "happiness in 5 easy steps". In a sound academic style, Seligman describes research on positive psychology exercises, post-traumatic growth, links between psychological well-being and health, and promising future research on well-being. Seligman also offers the reader a short peek into existing well-being (teaching) programs such as positive psychotherapy, MAPP (training Masters in Positive Psychology), Penn Resiliency Program (in schools), Comprehensive Soldier Fitness (in the U.S. Army), ...

c) Last (but not least), Seligman describes the history of Positive Psychology, the backstage academic and political bickering, the impact on science, media and politics. Seligman does not eschew stressing his own importance in this, balancing it with a self-depreciating humor (although it remains doubtful whether all readers really want to know about his diarrhea ensuing his watermelon diet).

These three thematic threads are intertwined in this book totaling 349 pages (First U.S. hardcover edition April 2011). Don't be misguided by the lack of notes in the main text: in the back, this book does contain 49 pages of extensive, page-per page notes where you can check many of the quoted scientific studies. A topic and name index of 28 pages is also included.

The book is definitely a U.S. product and may not always resonate with people from non-Anglo-Saxon cultures. This may be one of the major challenges in reaching the commendable and ambitious mission articulated at the end of this book: "By the year 2051, 51 percent of the people of the world will be flourishing."

I found "Flourish" a fascinating read that has held me captivated for three days straight.


Flourish: A Visionary New Understanding of Happiness and Well-being
Flourish: A Visionary New Understanding of Happiness and Well-being
von Martin E. P. Seligman
  Gebundene Ausgabe

5 von 6 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Übersicht der neuesten "Well-Being" Wissenschaft, 2. Mai 2011
Wahrscheinlich wird dieses Buch ein neues Standardwerk der Positiven Psychologie.

Positive psychology has come to be defined as "the scientific study of what enables individuals and communities to thrive". "Flourish" explores this concept of thriving. The last 15 years, Martin Seligman has been one of the major driving forces behind positive psychology. He has authored influential bestsellers such as Der Glücks-Faktor: Warum Optimisten länger leben / "Authentic Happiness" (2002). Now, again about a decade later, Seligman writes a new account of what he has been teaching and telling on conferences lately. He does so in a somewhat peculiar mix: a) a manifesto for a broad science of well-being, b) accounts of positive psychology research and practice, interlaced with c) a backstage history of positive psychology.

a) First of all, "Flourish" is a manifesto for a science of well-being. Seligman departs from his earlier "Authentic Happiness" concept and posits the broader topic of "well-being". "Authentic happiness" comprised three components: 1. positive emotion (feeling good), 2. engagement (flow) and 3. meaning. Seligman now adds two more components of well-being: 4. positive relationships and 5. accomplishment. To my humble opinion, the addition of 4. positive relationships is long overdue, whereas the addition of 5. accomplishment may turn out to be controversial.

b) Next, this book gives several examples of well-being research. Don't expect yet another pop self-help peptalk of "happiness in 5 easy steps". In a sound academic style, Seligman describes research on positive psychology exercises, post-traumatic growth, links between psychological well-being and health, and promising future research on well-being. Seligman also offers the reader a short peek into existing well-being (teaching) programs such as positive psychotherapy, MAPP (training Masters in Positive Psychology), Penn Resiliency Program (in schools), Comprehensive Soldier Fitness (in the U.S. Army), ...

c) Last (but not least), Seligman describes the history of Positive Psychology, the backstage academic and political bickering, the impact on science, media and politics. Seligman does not eschew stressing his own importance in this, balancing it with a self-depreciating humor (although it remains doubtful whether all readers really want to know about his diarrhea ensuing his watermelon diet).

These three thematic threads are intertwined in this book totaling 349 pages (First U.S. hardcover edition April 2011). Don't be misguided by the lack of notes in the main text: in the back, this book does contain 49 pages of extensive, page-per page notes where you can check many of the quoted scientific studies. A topic and name index of 28 pages is also included.

The book is definitely a U.S. product and may not always resonate with people from non-Anglo-Saxon cultures. This may be one of the major challenges in reaching the commendable and ambitious mission articulated at the end of this book: "By the year 2051, 51 percent of the people of the world will be flourishing."

I found "Flourish" a fascinating read that has held me captivated for three days straight.


The Encyclopedia of Positive Psychology
The Encyclopedia of Positive Psychology
von Shane J. Lopez
  Gebundene Ausgabe
Preis: EUR 379,00

5.0 von 5 Sternen Ein wer-ist-wer und was-ist-was der Positiven Psychologie, 2. Februar 2010
The Handbook of Positive Psychology, first published in 2002, has been one of the standard items on the bookshelf of the more serious scholar interested in Positive Psychology. Now Shane J. Lopez, one of its co-editors, did it again. The "Encyclopedia of Positive Psychology", first published in 2009, is a worthy and much improved sequel of and substitute for the 2002 "Handbook".

The "Encyclopedia of Positive Psychology" consists of two volumes, totaling 1125 pages. The flap mentions 288 entries, but I did count 291 - which probably reveals more than enough about my Positive Psychology nerdiness - better not mention that this thing is actually lying next to my bed so I can read it from flap to flap.

This Encyclopedia really is very accessible and readable (in contrast to the 2002 "Handbook"). The authors of the different entries read like a who-is-who of contemporary Positive Psychology. Of course choices had to be made, some of which are debatable. The major weakness of this publication, at the time of this writing, is its exorbitant price.

Just to give you an impression, here is what you can find under "S":

Saleebey, Dennis
Saving
Savoring
School Psychology
Self-Compassion
Self-Determination
Self-Efficacy
Self-Esteem
Self-Monitoring
Self-Regulation
Self-Report Inventory
Seligman, Martin
Serotonin
Smiles
Snyder, C.R.
Social Cognitive Theory
Social Skills
Social Support
Social Work
Solution-Focused Brief Therapy
Spiritual Well-Being
Spirituality
Sport Psychology
Stanton, Annette
Stereotype Threat
Stone, Phil
Strengths (Gallup)
Strengths (Personality)
Strengths Coaching
Strengths Perspective (Positive Psychology)
Strengths Perspective (Social Welfare)
Strengths-Based Organization
Successful Aging
Suffering


Outliers
Outliers
von Malcolm Gladwell
  Taschenbuch

13 von 17 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Erfolg: Harte Arbeit oder glückliche Umstände?, 22. Dezember 2008
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Outliers (Taschenbuch)
Ein sehr lesbares Popularwissenschaftliches Buch über Erfolg.

Outliers, in statistics, are results that are so extreme that they are generally not taken into account in calculations. So extreme that they are literally off the charts. Malcolm Gladwell's book Outliers: The Story of Success is about people that experience this kind of extreme success. People like the most succesful hockey and soccer players. People like Bill Gates. Or the Beatles. What is it that makes people so succesful?

First, it is hard work. To become an expert in a field, one needs at least about 10,000 hours of labor. Like an Asian farmer toiling away on his rice paddy field. The proverbial 99% transpiration that comes with the 1% inspiration.

Second, it is lucky circumstances. Sheer luck. Like being born at the beginning of the year instead of at the end (which makes a surprisingly significant difference in your chances of becoming a top hockey player). Or the country you're from. Or the language you've been raised in (English gives you an early math disadvantage of about a year compared to Chinese or Japanese).

In his previous bestseller The Tipping Point: How Little Things Can Make A Big Difference, Gladwell shows that small initial differences can make for a huge end effect on a society. Also his Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking was about conclusions we all draw from small differences in quick thought processes. In the same way, this book shows how sometimes incredibly small differences can tip somebody towards extreme success.

Small differences also made for the success of Malcolm Gladwell himself. One of the most precious gifts he allegedly got from his father is the memory of "seeing him work at his desk and realizing that he was happy". The same joyous work ethic oozes from the pages of this book.

Gladwell reads like a detective. He brings you science like a professional storyteller. The science, on the other hand, sometimes suffers a bit from this high readability (some conclusions about cultural causes are quite debatable). There are no footnotes in this book, but in the back of the publication, each chapter does have a number of notes to back up some of his claims.

This book is definitely an entertaining read. It is also a good way to weapon yourself against the abundance of success stories that sound a tad too good to be a full version of the truth.


The Happiness Equation: 100 Factors That Can Add to or Subtract from Your Happiness
The Happiness Equation: 100 Factors That Can Add to or Subtract from Your Happiness
von Bridget Grenville-Cleave
  Taschenbuch

5.0 von 5 Sternen Ein ziemlich wahrheitsgetreues Selbsthilfebüchlein über Glück, 27. November 2008
Ein kleines Buch über Glück, dass glaubwürdiger ist als es aussieht...

An Amazon book search with the keyword "happiness" yields more than 300.000 items nowadays. Many of these publications compete for your attention on the bulging self-help shelves of bookstores. They are generally brightly colored and often contain at least one or preferably several smileys. And most of them have the scientific value of a Spiderman comic book.

"The Happiness Equation" by Bridget Grenville-Cleave and Ilona Boniwell with Tina B. Tessina has the look and feel of just another of these self-help books. In 144 pages, it promises you "100 factors that can add to or substract from your happiness". Just do the math and see how happy you are. Then bring some change in your life by adding some positive factors and getting rid of some of the negative factors. There you are, congratulations, you helped yourself turn into a happier person. All thanks to this wondrous self-help book. Or so it promises.

If it looks like a duck, swims like a duck and quacks like a duck, it probably is a duck, right? Not quite. The smaller the print gets in this booklet, the more scientifically correct the information becomes. If you don't just skim the titles but actually take the effort of reading the well-written one-page descriptions of every factor, you get quite an up-to-date and condensed (so obviously not in-depth) overview of the scientific findings on the topic of happiness and positive psychology.

So are you looking for an easy-to-read self-help book on happiness that you can finish in one or two readings? And you don't want to waste your precious time with unscientific quack literature? Then you might want to take up "The Happiness Equation", think away its flashy superficial shell and enjoy the read.


Happiness: Unlocking the Mysteries of Psychological Wealth
Happiness: Unlocking the Mysteries of Psychological Wealth
von Ed Diener
  Gebundene Ausgabe
Preis: EUR 31,90

4 von 4 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Glück, so einfach wie möglich, aber nicht einfacher..., 20. November 2008
Ein Buch über Glück, das Wissenschaftlich korrekt und lesbar ist. Die Positive Psychologie hat mit diesem Buch einen neuen Klassiker dabei.

Inhalt:
Does money buy happiness? Does religion make you happy? What about marriage or children? What are the benefits of happiness? Is happiness genetically determined? Can you be too happy? If you want an easy one-sentence sound bite answer to questions like these, stop reading. If however you are interested in a well-balanced scientific view on the matter, you might want to take a second look at "Happiness: Unlocking the Mysteries of Psychological Wealth" by Ed Diener and Robert Biswas-Diener.

This publication is not your regular "10 steps to happiness" self-help book. This 250 pages read oozes with rigorous happiness research. Both authors have a combined happiness research experience of more than half a century. You can feel that they really live and breathe their science instead of just regurgitating article abstracts, and Ed Diener belongs to the happy few that have access to the priceless Gallup World Poll database. So this father-son couple really knows a thing or two about the science of happiness.

Most of the truckloads of happiness books out there try to make you as happy as possible. They embody an "optimizer" view on happiness. This publication is different. It is OK to be, say, quite happy without incessantly jumping around for joy. This book takes a "satisfyer" stance on the subject. Now it happens that research by Barry Schwartz shows that satisfyers eventually end up happier. So by not hardselling you happiness, this book might really make you happier eventually.

For a scientific book, this work is quite easy to digest. Academics might regret the lack of footnotes in the text, but many researchers are fairly mentioned by name. On the other hand, not every reader might want to know the details about the tattoos on the authors' body parts, or about how to cook a delicious bowl of cockroaches. But these parts make the book an entertaining read, occasionally bubbling with humour, which might offer you some extra fleeting moments of, well, happiness.

If you've never read a book about happiness, this one is definitely a good start. If your bookshelf shows off "Stumbling on Happiness" by Dan Gilbert or "The How of Happiness" by Sonja Lyubomirsky, just to mention a few, this one should be in your collection. And if you're looking for something to insert between your "Handbook of Positive Psychology" and your "Positive Psychology in a Nutshell", this one might perfectly do the job.


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