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Nick Bauman

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The Jini Specification (Jini Series)
The Jini Specification (Jini Series)
von Ken Arnold
  Taschenbuch

3.0 von 5 Sternen Good but lacking, 19. Juni 2000
Since it has so many glowing reviews, I'll give it a review that may be uselful to the authors for future additions.
I don't understand why Sun Microsystems, on their website and in thier books, (and this book is no exception) do not use UML to describe their libraries and frameworks. I, for one, learn a lot about dependencies and collaborations between classes when UML is employed. In the sections that have real code examples, it would be helpful to have a snippet of UML describing the section of Jini critical to that example, for instance.
Furthermore, in the earlier sections of the book, the overview, the authors use what I call "system collaboration diagrams", even better would be when they are explaining code snippets to highlight in their system collaboration diagrams what part of the system they are showing an example of.
I guess I just found the explaination of the examples lacking. The examples themselves are excerpted, making them hard to follow. For instance, it is confusing to see an ordinary method being called (from within an excerpt) with no class or object qualified before it. Is it in the superclass? In the implementation? If in the superclass, how far up? This is especially difficult when referring to the DEM of Java, which sometimes seems counterintuitive to beginners.
My rule of thumb is one should never look at a piece of code and get "nervous" about what a symbol or method is supposed to be doing there.


Life is a Miracle: An Essay on Modern Superstition: An Essay Against Modern Superstition
Life is a Miracle: An Essay on Modern Superstition: An Essay Against Modern Superstition
von Wendell Berry
  Gebundene Ausgabe

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5.0 von 5 Sternen Very moving, very salient, 2. Juni 2000
At a time when we seem to have forgotten that there is more to life than what can be proven, measured, quantified and sold, Wendel Berry asks us to realize that determinism cannot "learn" the most valuable lessons about life.
He saliently attacks biotechnology, enviro-engineering and many of the modern technological fields that attempt at a reductive view of nature and our relationship to it.
I will treasure this book long after the software I have written is turned to dust.
The only complaint I have is that Berry is constantly apologizing for his "lack of expertise" in the sciences he criticises. Mr. Berry, if you are reading this, you need not worry about your expertise. Indeed, it is the mark of a true scientist that she be more interested in what a person has to say than whether or not they have the "credentials" to say it. You keep talking, I wan't to listen! "Thy life is a miracle. Speak yet again"


Java(tm) Native Interface: Programmer's Guide and Specification: Programming Guide and Reference (Java (Addison-Wesley))
Java(tm) Native Interface: Programmer's Guide and Specification: Programming Guide and Reference (Java (Addison-Wesley))
von Sheng Liang
  Taschenbuch
Preis: EUR 32,58

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4.0 von 5 Sternen Good examples, concise approach, 28. Mai 2000
I had to integrate our company's distributed Java component-based application with a vendor's C/C++ - only libraries. My C++ skills had gotten pretty rusty and so I bought the Gordon JNI book and was really disappointed.
I then bought this book and was much happier with its examples and approach than the Gordon book. While the other reviewers in this page cited that they thought the book was bad or the examples didn't compile, they may be justified, but since they have only to choose from this and the Gordon book on JNI, I think they will find this book is far clearer and more concise.
What's more is that it's terse enough that you can get the whole book read during the course of a 3 week project.
And as far as the author having a bias towards Java is concerned: Duh.


XML by Example
XML by Example
von Benoit Marchal
  Taschenbuch

3.0 von 5 Sternen Some good special topics, but not comprehensive, 25. Mai 2000
Rezension bezieht sich auf: XML by Example (Taschenbuch)
This book is useful, it's just a question of how much.
I found that some of the "tutorial-style" topics discussed helped me get some general approaches down, but try looking in the index for XSLT and you'll find only 3 references. Then look under C++ and you will find a subheading for XSLT with 3 more referneces. And did you know that having an unescaped ampersand (&) in your #PCDATA will blow up some XML parsers? I can't find anything in the book that adresses this and it strikes me as fundamental. Many indications of whole book: a bit random and incomplete.
Still looking for a complete XML reference with examples.


The People's Chronology: A Year-By-Year Record of Human Events from Prehistory to the Present (A Henry Holt Reference Book)
The People's Chronology: A Year-By-Year Record of Human Events from Prehistory to the Present (A Henry Holt Reference Book)
von James Trager
  Taschenbuch

4.0 von 5 Sternen Ingenious concept, but don't take it at face value, 25. Dezember 1999
What a great idea: take nearly every year of human history and discuss the events as they unfold into a chain of causality. The effect on the reader is unparalleled.
However, there are historical innacuraccies throughout the work. The reader is best advised to get a "twenty-thousand-foot-level" view of the era that interests them from which to pursue more exhaustive texts.


Essential Jni: Java Native Interface (Essential Java)
Essential Jni: Java Native Interface (Essential Java)
von Alan McClellan
  Taschenbuch

2.0 von 5 Sternen Sun's tutorial online is much better, 24. Dezember 1999
If there is one good thing about this book it is that nearly all examples are written in C++, which the online tutorial at Sun's website doesn't do. But those examples are presented stiltedly and not in what I would consider a clear format.
There are a couple of special topics which I consider valuable for people interested in those topics: such as making an NT service and serial programming. I however, was not interested in those topics.
Gordon thinks he's witty, too (quoting great writers in the chapter headings). He's at best corny and at worst contrived.


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