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Marc Haegeman "Marc Haegeman" (Gent, Belgium)
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Der Nussknacker: Deluxe-Edit.
Der Nussknacker: Deluxe-Edit.
Preis: EUR 21,42

14 von 22 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen On unfamiliar ground, 23. November 2010
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Der Nussknacker: Deluxe-Edit. (Audio CD)
It's amusing to read from a conductor in a foreword to his newest recording, moreover meant to feature as plat de résistance of his 30 years with EMI campaign, that he previously hasn't been much of a fan of the composer he is playing. Of course, it has never been a secret that Simon Rattle isn't a Tchaikovskian and anyone who remembers the budding maestro accompanying Russian pianist Emil Gilels in Tchaikovsky's 1st piano concerto in the early Birmingham days, knows this went hand in hand with an evident lack of affinity with the composer's world. And although the light often appears with age and Rattle readily admits he always has had a soft spot for the ballets, a complete recording of Tchaikovsky's "Nutcracker" with the Berlin Philharmonic is still something of a surprise.

I wish, though, it would have been an event as well. Rattle's "Nutcracker" was recorded in late December 2009, with the 2nd Act spliced from the Silvesterkonzert to a studio recording. What immediately struck me are the lack of imagination and atmosphere of Rattle's approach. Surely, he gives us beautifully played snapshots, spotlighting Tchaikovsky's ever inventive orchestration as well as honoring the composer's dynamic markings, but he doesn't share much of a story and the few dramatic snippets he finds are sadly missing in evocative power. Rattle seems to be discovering the score and is mesmerized by the wealth of its melodies, but more than that as yet he isn't able to give. While Rattle rightfully emphasizes in his foreword the revolutionary quality of the score, highly influential on Stravinsky's ballets, his reading remains too relaxed and uneventful to convince. Don't try looking for the magic of a Christmas night here. The 1st scene is already played so uninvitingly off-hand that all you want to do is leave right away and look for a more promising party. Characteristically, the Berlin Philharmonic luxuriously wallows in its own virtuosity, yet it all sounds too much of a slick beauty contest without body and even less soul. Although expansively recorded the more weightier moments in the music lack punch as if Rattle always seems to hold back in the climaxes. After a rather unexciting battle, "In The Pine Forest" is curiously hesitant and disregards the sense of discovery and magic of the scene. The Pas de deux in Act 2 never really blooms.

The EMI recording lacks detail and clarity, which spoils much of the fun in this brilliant score. Strings and woodwinds are forwardly balanced, and during the orchestral climaxes in Act 1 the Berlin machinery tends to sound congested. Kudos for the presentation of this release, offered as a beautifully illustrated miniature hardcover book of some 60 pages, including next to Rattle's foreword, an essay on the history of the ballet (by John Warrack), a synopsis, and notes on the Berlin Philharmonic and the conductor.

Other conductors have given us far more satisfying readings: Ernest Ansermet finding character in every note; Antal Dorati, especially his recording with the Concertgebouw Amsterdam; Semyon Bychkov with a Berlin Philharmonic sounding far more inspired in 1986; Valery Gergiev with the Mariinsky Orchestra in one of his very best moments on disc. For a selection of excerpts Yevgeni Mravinsky with the Leningrad Philharmonic remains required listening.
Kommentar Kommentare (2) | Kommentar als Link | Neuester Kommentar: Dec 8, 2010 9:41 PM CET


Tchaikovsky/Liszt: First Piano Concertos
Tchaikovsky/Liszt: First Piano Concertos
Preis: EUR 21,99

14 von 19 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Killer coupling of two popular piano concertos, 31. Oktober 2010
When releasing a disc with two multi-recorded concertos like the Tchaikovsky and Liszt First Piano Concertos, a young artist is taking huge risks. The Deutsche Grammophon label or not behind you, when you have to face the competition of a Horowitz, Gilels, Richter, Weissenberg, Argerich and so many other giants and lesser gods for Tchaikovsky, and again Richter, Janis, Zimerman, Argerich, among others for Liszt, you have to know what you are doing. But then again, 22-year old Alice Sara Ott has been a pleasantly surprising artist who seems to know quite well where she's going, as could be experienced from her miraculous take on the Chopin Waltzes and her equally brilliant Lizst "Etudes d'exécution transcendante."

And here again, Alice Sara Ott surprises in the most felicitous manner by giving us a recording that proves fascinating from start to end. Tired of hearing Tchaikovsky's 1st piano concerto? Nothing more to say about it? It's mega-popular so it's boring, right? Well, not exactly. Alice Sara Ott with her poised youthful enthusiasm and controlled abandon might be the perfect antidote against such feelings. From the ravishingly phrased opening, which for once doesn't slap you in the face, you realize she is inviting us for a thoroughly enjoyable ride, which promises to shed a refreshing light at about every corner or stop on a work deemed oh so familiar. And promise is kept. Listening to her Tchaikovsky was indeed like visiting an old friend who all of the sudden appeared much younger, brighter and more enchanting than one ever imagined.

Ms. Ott calls Tchaikovsky's piano concert in B flat minor "revolutionary" and she makes us hear and understand why. It's more than just the formal experimentation of the piece which she rightly emphasizes in the liner notes. It's, even more, through her own intelligent analysis of the canvas of emotional states that the concerto holds and which place it among the greatest of its kind, but which very few artists manage to disclose in such a captivating way, that she makes the strongest case for it. She doesn't sound mannered, capricious, vulgar, or just out to be different, everything seems to flow naturally from the feeling of the moment. (The Tchaikovsky was recorded live.) And that is a tremendous achievement for an artist of her age. Moreover, as could be heard in her earlier discs the quality and precision of her piano toucher is totally ravishing - and what an impressive recording DG gives us here. Every note sounds exactly right, possessing the right meaning, and while the more exuberant passages are undeniably thrillingly played, they are balanced by that equally impressively molded sonority which made her Chopin and Liszt such a treat. In this respect Thomas Hengelbrock and the Münchner Philharmoniker provide the ideal accompaniment. The second movement is a gorgeous moment, softly nostalgic and lyrical, with Tchaikovsky's orchestration sounding more beautiful than ever.

Alice Sara Ott's rendition of Liszt's 1st Piano Concerto is much of the same calibre. Soloist and conductor avoid the pitfall of empty virtuosity, but it's above all Ott's stylistic accuracy and emotional flexibility which strike a convincing balance and hoist the piece above the banal. We know from her Etudes she commands Liszt's broad range of colors like none else. It's the delicate, nocturnal quality of the quasi adagio which lingers on as much as the full-blooded bravura passages.

A sublime disc that makes me look out for the Second Piano Concertos.


Tchaikovsky: Nutcracker - Highlights (exklusiv bei Amazon.de)
Tchaikovsky: Nutcracker - Highlights (exklusiv bei Amazon.de)
Preis: EUR 10,57

5 von 7 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen On unfamiliar ground, 29. Oktober 2010
It's amusing to read from a conductor in a foreword to his newest recording, moreover meant to feature as plat de résistance of his 30 years with EMI campaign, that he previously hasn't been much of a fan of the composer he is playing. Of course, it has never been a secret that Simon Rattle isn't a Tchaikovsky admirer and anyone who remembers the budding maestro accompanying Russian pianist Emil Gilels in Tchaikovsky's 1st piano concerto in the early Birmingham days, knows this went hand in hand with an evident lack of affinity with the composer's world. And although the light often appears with age and Rattle readily admits he always has had a soft spot for the ballets, a complete recording of Tchaikovsky's "Nutcracker" with the Berlin Philharmonic is still something of a surprise.

I wish, though, it would have been an event as well. Rattle's "Nutcracker" was recorded in late December 2009, with the 2nd Act spliced from the Silvesterkonzert to a studio recording. What immediately struck me are the lack of imagination and atmosphere of Rattle's approach. Surely, he gives us beautifully played snapshots, spotlighting Tchaikovsky's ever inventive orchestration as well as honoring his dynamic markings, but he doesn't share much of a story and the few dramatic snippets he finds are sadly missing in evocative power. He is discovering the score and seems to be mesmerized by the wealth of its melodies, but more than that as yet he isn't able to give. While Rattle rightfully emphasizes in his foreword the revolutionary quality of the score, highly influential on Stravinsky's ballets, his reading remains too relaxed and uneventful to convince. Don't try looking for the magic of a Christmas night here. The 1st scene is already played so uninvitingly off-hand that all you want to do is leave right away and look for a more promising party. Characteristically, the Berlin Philharmonic luxuriously wallows in its own virtuosity, yet it all sounds too much of a slick beauty contest without body and even less soul. Although expansively recorded the more weightier moments in the music lack punch as if Rattle always seems to hold back in the climaxes. After a rather unexciting battle, "In The Pine Forest" is curiously hesitant and disregards the sense of discovery and magic of the scene. The Pas de deux in Act 2 never really blooms.

The EMI recording lacks detail and clarity, which spoils much of the fun in this brilliant score. Strings and woodwinds are forwardly balanced, and during the orchestral climaxes in Act 1 the Berlin machinery tends to sound congested. (This release also comes in a deluxe limited edition, offering a beautifully illustrated miniature hardcover book of some 60 pages, including next to Rattle's foreword, an essay on the history of the ballet, a synopsis, and notes on the Berlin Philharmonic and the conductor.)

Other conductors have given us far more satisfying readings: Ernest Ansermet finding character in every note; Antal Dorati, especially his recording with the Concertgebouw Amsterdam; Semyon Bychkov with a Berlin Philharmonic sounding far more inspired in 1986; Valery Gergiev with the Mariinsky Orchestra in one of his very best moments on disc. For a selection of excerpts Yevgeni Mravinsky with the Leningrad Philharmonic remains required listening.
Kommentar Kommentare (2) | Kommentar als Link | Neuester Kommentar: Feb 29, 2012 11:51 AM CET


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