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Charles at Fifty
Charles at Fifty
von Anthony Holden
  Gebundene Ausgabe
Preis: EUR 17,57

4.0 von 5 Sternen Hanoverian History Repeats Itself in Prince Charles, 15. Oktober 1999
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Charles at Fifty (Gebundene Ausgabe)
Although some may find fault with the author for criticizing Charles more than Diana, frankly Charles is more 'accident prone' so it's beyond me how any even-handed author could write anything about the Charles/Diana events without sounding too pro-Diana.
Though well intentioned at heart, Charles is a product of his breeding--not just the man warped by being surrounded by sycophants but a man who has inherited the Hanover/Windsor genetic faults. First among these is the fact that Charles, like his great-grandfather George V, is not too bright. Unlike George V, he wants to be seen as bright and this is what leads him into trouble. Charles's lack of focus and desire to meddle in politics is a fault he shares with Edward VIII--along with an overly long, dissolute bachelorhood and a penchant for choosing the wrong woman.
Diana has her faults too, but to paraphrase Jane Austen's comment about George IV, "She was bad, but she would not have become as bad as she was if he had not been infinitely worse."
All the author had to do was write from record and let the actions of the man damn him. This is what he did. Charles is his own worst enemy.
Charles will be king in due time, but for the sake of the monarchy, may Elizabeth II live a long time, may Charles gain a better sense of what a British monarch should do before he becomes king and may his reign be a short one.


Writing for Story: Craft Secrets of Dramatic Nonfiction (Reference)
Writing for Story: Craft Secrets of Dramatic Nonfiction (Reference)
von Jonathan Franklin
  Taschenbuch
Preis: EUR 13,43

5.0 von 5 Sternen The Real Write-Stuff, 3. November 1998
How to Write books are irresistible to the novice writer: 'Read me and I'll tell you what you need to know to be famous, or at least published.' At first the reader is thrilled when he or she recognizes a kindred spirit in the author, then the reader tries to apply what he or she learned. More often than not the lessons of the book are little more than a collection of the author's war stories. The novice writer suspects that writing is an art form, not subject to the laws of physics. Jon Franklin says: 'No, good short stories have form, structure and behavior patterns that can be analyzed.'
The workaday world of journalism, not academia, honed Franklin's skills. He served his apprenticeship under a quintessential irascible old editor, G. Vern Blasdell. The young Franklin learned his craft by squirming in his seat while awaiting the old man's verdict. Now it's his turn to teach but he's at a disadvantage Blasdell never faced. The reader doesn't work for him and won't oblige by twitching so much as one butt muscle. Franklin must win the reader's attention by the pure utility of his method.
Unlike most writers, Franklin has something in common with good mathematicians. He realizes that a formula can be memorized but if one doesn't understand the assumptions on which the formula is derived, one can never apply the formula successfully. This is as true in writing as it is in mathematics.
Franklin builds his case for formula carefully. He demonstrates the nature of each assumption-a complication must be significant to the human condition; if you can't see the complication, look for the action and work your way back to the motivation, etc. Once the reader understands the assumptions, the formula becomes a useful tool in the hand of the writer, not some abstract theory laid to rust in a forgotten corner of the mind.
Once the reader is hooked, Franklin introduces the outline. More than a butt muscle twitches here; the reader squirms as visions of that Roman numerated nemesis of junior high come to mind. But this is not what Franklin has in mind. Franklin talks of a simple three-word, five-sentence form called the conflict-resolution outline. Character-action verb-direct object, what could be simpler? Diving in and writing first and thinking later, but this would be less productive in the long run.
The conflict-resolution outline forces the writer to think though the elements of good story first and make sure these elements are present before the writing begins. This method means survival for a journalist faced with a deadline. This method insures a more satisfying and successful writing experience for any writer.
Franklin teaches the 'work smarter, not harder' principles of current business practice. The importance of this to writers can not be understated. Ultimately, all writing is business if one wants to be a successful writer. The writer must produce a good product that sells itself to the editor and in turn, the reader; otherwise the writer will be unpaid. In this book, Franklin earned his pay.


Writing for Story: Craft Secrets of Dramatic Nonfiction (Reference)
Writing for Story: Craft Secrets of Dramatic Nonfiction (Reference)
von Jonathan Franklin
  Taschenbuch
Preis: EUR 13,43

5.0 von 5 Sternen The Real Write-Stuff, 24. Oktober 1998
How to Write books are irresistible to the novice writer: 'Read me and I'll tell you what you need to know to be famous, or at least published.' At first the reader is thrilled when he or she recognizes a kindred spirit in the author, then the reader tries to apply what he or she learned. More often than not the lessons of the book are little more than a collection of the author's war stories. The novice writer suspects that writing is an art form, not subject to the laws of physics. Jon Franklin says: 'No, good short stories have form, structure and behavior patterns that can be analyzed.'
The workaday world of journalism, not academia, honed Franklin's skills. He served his apprenticeship under a quintessential irascible old editor, G. Vern Blasdell. The young Franklin learned his craft by squirming in his seat while awaiting the old man's verdict. Now it's his turn to teach but he's at a disadvantage Blasdell never faced. The reader doesn't work for him and won't oblige by twitching so much as one butt muscle. Franklin must win the reader's attention by the pure utility of his method.
Unlike most writers, Franklin has something in common with good mathematicians. He realizes that a formula can be memorized but if one doesn't understand the assumptions on which the formula is derived, one can never apply the formula successfully. This is as true in writing as it is in mathematics.
Franklin builds his case for formula carefully. He demonstrates the nature of each assumption-a complication must be significant to the human condition; if you can't see the complication, look for the action and work your way back to the motivation, etc. Once the reader understands the assumptions, the formula becomes a useful tool in the hand of the writer, not some abstract theory laid to rust in a forgotten corner of the mind.
Once the reader is hooked, Franklin introduces the outline. More than a butt muscle twitches here; the reader squirms as visions of that Roman numerated nemesis of junior high come to mind. But this is not what Franklin has in mind. Franklin talks of a simple three-word, five-sentence form called the conflict-resolution outline. Character-action verb-direct object, what could be simpler? Diving in and writing first and thinking later, but this would be less productive in the long run.
The conflict-resolution outline forces the writer to think though the elements of good story first and make sure these elements are present before the writing begins. This method means survival for a journalist faced with a deadline. This method insures a more satisfying and successful writing experience for any writer.
Franklin teaches the 'work smarter, not harder' principles of current business practice. The importance of this to writers can not be understated. Ultimately, all writing is business if one wants to be a successful writer. The writer must produce a good product that sells itself to the editor and in turn, the reader; otherwise the writer will be unpaid. In this book, Franklin earned his pay.


The Unruly Queen: The Life of Queen Caroline
The Unruly Queen: The Life of Queen Caroline
von Flora Fraser
  Gebundene Ausgabe

2 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen It's Deja Vu All Over Again, 18. Oktober 1998
Of Queen Caroline, Jane Austen said: "She was bad, but she would not have become as bad as she was if he had not been infinitely worse." Caroline of Brunswick is a fascinating person--part Fergie, part the injured Diana, Princess of Wales. The "he" in this case is George IV, the five times great uncle of the current Prince of Wales, whose petulant anger over his wife's greater popularity is so reminiscent of our century's War of the Waleses. Indeed, it is the similarities between the two that makes this book a worthwhile read. Still, this book is a weighty, scholarly tome. The author doesn't completely drown the drama but there are times (when she uses the stilted court English of the era) she comes perilously close to doing so. This material in the hands of a storyteller instead of a scholar could have been a best seller.


How to Be a Perfect Stranger: Volume 2: A Guide to Etiquette in Other People's Religious Ceremonies
How to Be a Perfect Stranger: Volume 2: A Guide to Etiquette in Other People's Religious Ceremonies
von Arthur J. Magida
  Gebundene Ausgabe

5.0 von 5 Sternen A Welcome Gift for Our Times, 23. August 1998
Children of my generation were taught to be polite but not to attend a church or temple outside our denomination. What a tragedy. For all our assumed good manners we missed opportunities to broaden our understanding and thus, our appreciation, of others. In a true exercise of good manners, this book is an open door, a welcome gift, to come and appreciate the variety of worship there is today.


The Gifts of the Jews (Hinges of History)
The Gifts of the Jews (Hinges of History)
von Thomas Cahill
  Gebundene Ausgabe
Preis: EUR 18,35

5.0 von 5 Sternen How the History of the Jews Expanded Our Minds, 7. August 1998
I could say that what initially attracted me to this book was that it pissed off all the right people: religious fundamentalists and biblical scholars who burrow in too deep to "see the forest for the trees." That would only be partially right. I wanted to get a good overview of the meaning of the Old Testament--something I, an average person, could consider as I re-read it. This book meets this need.
Mr. Cahill is a good "generalist" whose views should not be dismissed lightly. He did his homework as a religious editor. His Notes and Sources at the back of this book is sufficient reference for me. I enjoyed his point-of-view and will keep it in mind while I read the Old Testament. I'm always free to disagree, but I like his mind-expanding thoughts on these matters.


How to Be a Perfect Stranger: Volume 1: A Guide to Etiquette in Other People's Religious Ceremonies
How to Be a Perfect Stranger: Volume 1: A Guide to Etiquette in Other People's Religious Ceremonies
von Arthur J. Magida
  Gebundene Ausgabe

5.0 von 5 Sternen A Welcome Gift for Our Times, 2. August 1998
Children of my generation were taught to be polite but not to attend a church or temple outside our denomination. What a tragedy. For all our assumed good manners we missed opportunities to broaden our understanding and thus, our appreciation, of others. In a true exercise of good manners, this book is an open door, a welcome gift, to come and appreciate the variety of worship there is today.


Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil
Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil
von John Berendt
  Gebundene Ausgabe
Preis: EUR 20,59

5.0 von 5 Sternen Ohhh, Baby! You Gotta Dig This One!, 1. August 1998
A South that can nurture such a delightful collection of eccentrics as The Lady Chablis and Luther Driggers can't be all bad. This book is pure summer delight in its range of characters and storytelling.
After reading the book, I looked forward to seeing the movie. With the exception of seeing the Lady Herself in action, the movie was one BIG Let Down! Why Clint Eastwood and his screen writers thought they could do better than John Berendt in telling this story is beyond me. There is a reason why this book became a best-seller. Mr. Eastwood should have paid closer attention to the book in his film adaptation. Mr. Berendt's Savannah is a far more honest and satisfying place to be than Mr. Eastwood's celluloid farce.


Deja Dead: A Novel (A Temperance Brennan Novel)
Deja Dead: A Novel (A Temperance Brennan Novel)
von Kathy Reichs
  Gebundene Ausgabe
Preis: EUR 20,78

4.0 von 5 Sternen Gory but Good, 31. Juli 1998
I have not read Patricia Cornwell and I don't normally read this genre so I can only evaluate this book on its merits. Sure this book has some flaws but this is a first novel. Sure, there is gore, but only in the beginning chapters of the book, when the reader is allowed into the world of the forensic anthropologist. The description of maggots and a putrid corpse is awful, but we need to realize what we're asking others to do in the name of solving crimes. Let's not mince words here--the stench, the maggots, the ooze--all this is a real part of it and to not speak of it is wrong. This description, as awful as it is, makes the motivation behind Dr. Tempe Brannon's obsessive search for the killer more understandable. She has the unenviable job of cleaning up the mess and she wants to get at its source. I found this book to be a page-turner that carried me through from the beginning to the end.


Fibromyalgia Help Book: A Practical Guide to Living Better with Fibromyalgia
Fibromyalgia Help Book: A Practical Guide to Living Better with Fibromyalgia
von Jenny Fransen
  Taschenbuch

4.0 von 5 Sternen Making Sense Out of A Mysterious Illness, 23. Juli 1998
When my doctor told me he thought I had fibromyalgia, I thought "Oh, great! A garbage can diagnosis--he's telling me something just to keep me happy." I had gone through every pamphlet on the office wall and this was the last one he had that he could hand to me. It didn't make me feel any better. I still have the sleep disorder, the chronic pain and fatigue. I have periods in which I can be semi-normal, and other periods when I'm a zombie. My employer gave up on me and my government doesn't believe I have a disability that should be covered by SSDI. Meanwhile, I suffer.
So, it's a relief to find a book that helps me make sense of this. I still feel rotten but I feel more comfortable with the diagnosis, and I now have answers that may help me reclaim a more normal life. That's more than I thought possible before reading this book. This book is recommended by the Fibromyalgia Network as a good starting point and reference for those who have fibromyalgia, and for their ! families who need to know what to make of it. I agree.


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