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Beiträge von K. Bennett
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K. Bennett (Rolla, MO USA)
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Pumpkin Patch Parable
Pumpkin Patch Parable
von Liz Curtis Higgs
  Gebundene Ausgabe

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5.0 von 5 Sternen Places jack-o-lanterns in a whole new light, 14. Juni 2000
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Pumpkin Patch Parable (Gebundene Ausgabe)
This is the perfect book for bringing a Christian perspective to the celebration of Halloween! Liz Curtis Higgs tells the story of the Farmer, who plants a garden bearing all kinds of vegetables. His favorite vegetable is the pumpkin, which grows in all different sizes and shapes. When it's harvest time, the Farmer carefully picks the pumpkin, scoops out the slimy pulp, carves a face, and places a light inside.
The story ends by telling how God is the Farmer, and we are just like those pumpkins, chosen by Him, made clean and given His light. For older readers, this similarity is reinforced by appropriate Bible verses on the bottom of each page.
I use this book every year just before Halloween in my third grade Sunday School class. My students are just learning to use their Bibles, so I start by having the kids look up some of the verses before we read the story. Those verses that seemed dry and dusty before the story come alive when we read about the Farmer. I also share this book with my own, younger kids, just before we carve jack-o'-lanterns. We remember the parable and its meaning every time we see one of those grinning pumpkins.


Go Away, Big Green Monster!
Go Away, Big Green Monster!
von Ed Emberley
  Gebundene Ausgabe
Preis: EUR 11,99

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5.0 von 5 Sternen Better than "Monster Spray", 14. Juni 2000
This book is the ultimate "empowering tool" for giving little ones control over their fears. It first builds a monster, adding a feature or two on each page through the use of cut-out pages. First the two big yellow eyes appear, then the long bluish-greenish nose. By the time you add the big, scary green face, you've got one scary monster.
But don't worry, because once Big Green Monster is all put together, he's taken apart again. "YOU DON'T SCARE ME!" reads the text, "So, GO AWAY..." Page by page and one by one, the scary features disappear as ordered. The book ends with "GO AWAY, Big Green Monster! And DON'T COME BACK! Until I say so."
Wow. If only I'd had this book when that scary clown was in my son's closet. Or when the mysterious cowboy was in his brother's room. Or when that nasty giant was hiding out in my parents' fireplace about thirty years ago.


Love You Forever
Love You Forever
von Robert Munsch
  Taschenbuch
Preis: EUR 5,31

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5.0 von 5 Sternen A great book for your kids or your mom, 13. Juni 2000
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Love You Forever (Taschenbuch)
This is another one of those books I can't read without having to dab at my eyes. Any loving parent, or child of a loving parent, will recognize the overwhelming love the mother in this story feels for her son. When her son is a newborn, she rocks him and sings to him, "I'll love you forever, I'll like you for always, As long as I'm living my baby you'll be." When he's asleep, she rocks him and sings him that song through each stage of his childhood. When he's a grown man with his own home, she drives over to his house with a ladder, makes sure he is fast asleep, climbs through his bedroom window, then rocks him and sings to him (my husband thinks this is a little strange, but I'm convinced that there are plenty of mothers out there who would do the same if they thought they could get away with it).
The tears come when the mother gets sick, and can't finish the song. Her son then holds her in his lap, rocks her, and sings to her. Then he goes home, picks up his newborn daughter, and sings. The illustrations are a beautiful complement to the story. Not only does the son grow up, but the mother slowly grows older. Her house keeps its old-fashioned look, even down to the rotary phone on her bedside; his house is more modern, with up-to-date kitchen appliances. The mother has a striped cat that appears in several illustrations of the boy growing up. In his house, there is a kitten, that grows into a cat, that turns into a rather large, well-fed cat by the end of the story.
Not only am I sharing this book with my kids, but I gave my mom a copy for Mother's Day.


I Love You the Purplest
I Love You the Purplest
von Barbara M. Joosse
  Gebundene Ausgabe
Preis: EUR 16,22

5.0 von 5 Sternen Wonderful book!, 13. Juni 2000
Rezension bezieht sich auf: I Love You the Purplest (Gebundene Ausgabe)
Wow! Sometimes you read a book and think, "This was written just for me." That's how I felt when I read this one. I have four children who were born within six years of each other, and at times the sibling rivalry can be quite intense. My kids ask, "Who do you love the best?" The standard answer of "I love you all exactly the same" isn't exactly true. I love them all immensely just because they are mine, but I also love each of them differently because each one is unique. Barbara M. Joosse conveys this in her story of a summer evening that a mother and her two sons spend at a lakeside cabin. From the opening lines about hunting for bait, she makes it obvious that these two boys have distinct personalities: "Max exploded from the cabin, twirling the shovel in front of him. Mama came next, and then Julian. Julian shut the cabin door tightly to keep it safe from burglars and bears." Whenever the boys ask their mother who is the best, she gives them an answer that allows them both to be special. Max catches the liveliest worms, and Julian catches the juiciest; Julian is the rower with the deepest strokes, and Max is the rower with the fastest. When each boy asks, "Mama, who do you love the best?" She answers by giving them each a color of love that matches his personality. Julian is the bluest. Max is the reddest. Each boy is thrilled with her answer.
Mary Whyte's illustrations are a beautiful complement to the story. The pictures fill each two page spread with the soft colors of a summer evening. The mother and sons are strikingly real. I look at Max and Julian and see my own boys, one overflowing with exuberant energy, the other cooler and more reflective.


Guess How Much I Love You
Guess How Much I Love You
von Sam McBratney
  Pappbilderbuch

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5.0 von 5 Sternen Still brings tears to our eyes, 13. Juni 2000
Rezension bezieht sich auf: Guess How Much I Love You (Pappbilderbuch)
In this tender story about a father putting his child to bed, Sam McBratney effectively conveys the depth of the love I feel for my own children, but am often unable to put into words. Little Nutbrown Hare wants to tell his father, Big Nutbrown Hare, just how much he loves him, but no matter what measure Little Nutbrown Hare chooses, his father always loves him more. For example, Little Nutbrown Hare loves his father as high as he can hop, but Big Nutbrown Hare loves his son as high as he can hop, and he can hop much higher. Finally, the tired little rabbit tells his father he loves him right up to the moon. Big Nutbrown Hare kisses his son good night and whispers, "I love you right up to the moon-- and back."
Anita Jeram's pen and ink and watercolor illustrations of father and son gracefully capture the love they feel for each other. She hasn't drawn the typical cute little bunnies found in many children's books; she's drawn creatures capable of expressing emotion. The expression on Little Nutbrown Hare's face as he's falling asleep is one I've seen on my own children. Her pictures also show an incredible range of movement, from stretching arms as high or as wide as possible to very gently kissing a sleeping child on the forehead.
This is one of my favorite books. It's a standard part of any "new baby" gift I give, and everyone who has received it from me tells me that they cried when they read it. I still cry.


One Green Frog (Poke and Look)
One Green Frog (Poke and Look)
von Yvonne Hooker
  Taschenbuch

5.0 von 5 Sternen A great way to intorduce counting to your child, 12. Juni 2000
Rezension bezieht sich auf: One Green Frog (Poke and Look) (Taschenbuch)
This is my favorite counting book! Not only are the pages sturdy enough for little hands, but they have round holes just perfect for little fingers to poke through. Starting with one green frog, each page features a number in big, black type, and a corresponding illustration. One eye of each illustration is cut out, making a continuous hole all the way through the book. This book makes learning to count as easy as 1, 2, 3. The bright, crisp illustrations are set on a white background. Those illustrating larger numbers are neatly lined up, so your child can concentrate on counting without having to search for that tenth bumble bee.


The Stinky Cheese Man: And Other Fairly Stupid Tales (Caldecott Honor Book)
The Stinky Cheese Man: And Other Fairly Stupid Tales (Caldecott Honor Book)
von Jon Scieszka
  Gebundene Ausgabe
Preis: EUR 17,33

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5.0 von 5 Sternen The perfect antidote to "Fairy Tale Burnout", 12. Juni 2000
This book defies description . . .but I'll give it my best shot. If, like me, you're ready to tear your lips off if you have to read the traditional story of "The Three Little Pigs" one more time, then you need to go into a quiet room, settle in a comfy chair, and read this book. Don't forget to lock the door, or the rest of the family will want to come in to see what you're laughing about.
As the introduction states, "[t]he stories in this book are Fairly Stupid Tales." They've got names like Cinderumpelstiltskin, the Really Ugly Ducking, and Chicken Licken. Then there's The Stinky Cheese Man, about the child fashioned out of stinky cheese by a lonely old woman and her husband. "When she opened the oven to see if he was done, the smell knocked her back. 'Phew! What is that terrible smell?' she cried. The Stinky Cheese Man hopped out of the oven and ran out the door calling, 'Run run run as fast as you can. You can't catch me, I'm the Stinky Cheese Man!' The little old lady and the little old man sniffed the air. 'I'm not really very hungry,' said the little old man. 'I'm not really all that lonely,' said the little old lady."
To fully appreciate how funny this book is, you need to hold it in your hands and check out the illustrations. They are funny in and of themselves, and the way the book is put together is nothing short of brilliant. This is the perfect book for the sophisticated reader of whatever age.


The Dumb Bunnies
The Dumb Bunnies
von Sue Denim
  Taschenbuch

5.0 von 5 Sternen Just who is Sue Demin, anyway?, 12. Juni 2000
Rezension bezieht sich auf: The Dumb Bunnies (Taschenbuch)
This is the perfect book for a kid whose favorite jokes revolve around the words "toilet" and "underwear" -- your typical four year old, for instance. My typical four year old loves it! The Dumb Bunnies are a family of clueless rabbits who might remind you of a certain family of bears. When they go to town to let their porridge cool off, they take their bikes, which are strapped on top of their car. "'Can I drive the car?" asked Baby Bunny. "'You don't know how to drive," said Poppa Bunny. 'You'd get us all killed.' "'Aw, please?' asked Baby Bunny. "'Duh, okay,' said Poppa Bunny." While the Dumb Bunnies are in town bowling at the library and picnicking in the car wash, Little Red Goldilocks, whose skin is white as snow, breaks into their house. She sleeps in Poppa Bunny's porridge, eats Momma Bunny's bed, and uses Baby Bunny's pimple cream, but the Dumb Bunnies love her. In fact, Baby Bunny loves her so much, that he flushes her down the toilet. This book was my first introduction to Dav Pilkey, and now I'm a diehard fan. His cartoon drawings are hilarious! The cover of The Dumb Bunnies shows the family in the great green room from "Good Night Moon," complete with the bowl of mush on a table and lava lamps on the mantle. There's even a big gold Caldecott-like seal over the illustration which reads "This book is too dumb to win an award." Well, if four year olds could give book awards, this one would be a sure winner!


The Jolly Postman: Or Other People's Letters
The Jolly Postman: Or Other People's Letters
von Janet Ahlberg
  Gebundene Ausgabe

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5.0 von 5 Sternen Ever wonder what type of junk mail a wicked witch gets?, 12. Juni 2000
In this book, the Jolly Postman is delivering the mail to the residents of a quaint fairy tale village, and you get to read all the letters -- even the junk mail! Every other page is an envelope with some type of correspondence tucked inside. The Three Bears get a handwritten apology from Goldilocks, complete with misspellings and invitation to a birthday party. The occupant of Gingerbread Bungalow in The Woods, who happens to be the Wicked Witch, gets an advertising circular from Hobgoblin Supplies Ltd. A certain snout-nosed grandma gets a demand letter addressed to Mr. B.B. Wolf from Miss Riding-Hood's attorney, who also states, "On a separate matter, we must inform you that The Three Little Pigs Ltd. are now firmly resolved to sue for damages. . .all this huffing and puffing will get you nowhere." Some of the funniest moments in this book come from the illustrations of the Jolly Postman stopping for tea with each mail delivery. At the Wicked Witch's cottage, he peruses the newspaper, the Mirror Mirror, while the witch reads her mail and her black cat does the dishes. At Cinderella's castle, he enjoys a glass of champagne poured by Prince Charming, who is still in his honeymoon Hawaiian print shirt and white slacks. This book is perfect for sharing one on one with a child, but if there aren't any children available, it's also amusing for solitary adults.


Rumpelstiltskin's Daughter
Rumpelstiltskin's Daughter
von Diane Stanley
  Gebundene Ausgabe

5.0 von 5 Sternen Wonderful story, stunning illustrations, 12. Juni 2000
Sometimes I run across a book that has such a well-crafted story and such exquisite illustrations that I just sit back and say, "Wow!" This book by Diane Stanley is one of those "wow" books. In this version of Rumpelstiltskin, the miller's daughter, Meredith, is not a brainless wench who jumps at the chance to marry the king. Rumpelstiltskin is not an evil child-snatching gnome. In fact, he's a sweet soul who only wants one thing in life -- a child to love and care for. No wonder Meredith decides to ditch the king and marry Rumpelstiltskin. Besides, she has a weakness for short men. Rumpelstiltskin and Meredith marry, work on their farm, and raise their daughter. Although the family could use Rumpelstiltskin's talents to become exceedingly rich, he only spins a small amount of gold to buy those things they can't make or grow themselves. The rest of the people in the kingdom are not so lucky. The greedy king has rooms full of gold while his subjects are penniless and starving. No wonder he needs a contingent of armed guards who have elevated teeth-gnashing and sword-clutching into an art form.
When Rumpelstiltskin's daughter is sixteen, her parents let her take the odd bit of gold into town to exchange it for coins to buy necessities. Eventually the old greedy king hears about this, kidnaps Rumpelstiltskin's daughter, and locks her in a tower filled with straw. "Rumpelstiltskin's daughter looked around. She saw a pile of straw the size of a bus. She saw a locked door and high windows. She gave a big sigh and began to think. She knew her father could get her out of this pickle. But she had heard stories about the king all her life. One room full of gold would never satisfy him. Her father would be stuck here, spinning, until there was not an iota of straw left in the kingdom. "After a while she climbed the pile of straw and thought some more. She thought about the poor farmers and about the hungry children with their thin faces and sad eyes. She put the two thoughts together and cooked up a plan. . ." Instead of spinning straw into gold, Rumpelstiltskin's daughter puts her plan (which Ms. Stanley develops so cleverly that you really should read it for yourself) into action and saves the kingdom by teaching the king some simple lessons in economics and public relations. By the end of the story, the king offers her his hand in marriage, which she wisely declines. "Why don't you make me prime minister, instead," she suggests.
The best word to describe the illustrations is sumptuous. Diane Stanley's greedy king with his elegantly styled coif bears a striking resemblance to Louis XIV, and the artwork mirrors the Sun King's opulence. The palace shines with gilded ceilings and elaborate tiled floors. On the palace walls hang masterpieces so famous that my six year old can recognize most of them --works by da Vinci, Van Gogh, Picasso.


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