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Omens, Romans and romance! (archaeological mystery/romance)


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Ersteintrag: 10.11.2011 04:19:19 GMT+01:00
New for November 2011,The Five-Day Dig is a contemporary mystery/romance that revolves around an archaeological excavation. Quick description:

A chance to translate inscriptions near Pompeii is a dream for classics prof Winnie Price, except the dig is for a cheesy TV show. The host is more sensationalist than scientist, Winnie’s boss horns his way in on the project, and her cocky teaching assistant keeps flirting with her—and getting harder to resist.

The other issue is that on her last trip to Italy, her father died there. A spiritual cynic since losing him, she resists reading into the goddess symbols that keep popping up in her life. What concerns her more are a looter’s hole at the dig site and an unexplained collapse in the ruins. Then it turns out the referral letter that got her the gig was forged, and the prime suspect is her—or her assistant.

Add to the mix a reenactment of pagan rites spiced up with a psychoactive homebrew, and Winnie has more to interpret than Latin.

Read the first chapter on my blog here: http://www.jenmalin.com/fivedaydig

Thanks so much for checking out my book. Please also consider "liking" my blog and/or the book page -- it helps! : )

Jen

Veröffentlicht am 19.11.2011 04:53:35 GMT+01:00
Excited to see that the paperback edition of The Five-Day Dig is now available on http://amazon.de. The product linking didn't work for me here in the forums, but when I searched for the ISBN number (978-1466443471), it came up for 9,99.

For those of you who are all digital (like my husband, though not me), the good news is that the Kindle version of The Five-Day Dig is now reduced. (Showed up at 3,34 when I just searched for the link.)

Meanwhile, on my blog this week, I posted a review of the strange, sexy, ancient Roman novel, The Golden Ass. (I recommend it!) Link here: http://www.jenmalin.com/archives/742

Happy reading!
Jen

Veröffentlicht am 29.11.2011 16:13:36 GMT+01:00
L. Hawkins meint:
I believe this book by author Barbara Ivie fits your description

Treasure of Egypt (Treasure of the Ancients)

Veröffentlicht am 02.12.2011 03:54:13 GMT+01:00
Looks good, Alm! Thanks for sharing.

Meanwhile, I was very excited that the University of Pennsylvania Museum (@pennmuseum) retweeted my book tweet this morning! 8 )

This week on the blog, I wonder, "What books are in the only ancient library to survive the Dark Ages?" In The Five-Day Dig, TV host Dunk Mortill, determined to save his archaeology show from being cancelled, hopes to find ancient scrolls during an excavation outside Pompeii. At the same time, he suspects a local priest of trying to get to the texts first and suppress them.

In reality, the only ancient library known to have survived the destruction of two millennia as well as the anti-intellectual climate of the Dark Ages is one found at Herculaneum, a town destroyed in the same eruption that buried Pompeii ...

Please stop by if you're interested: http://www.jenmalin.com/archives/769

Thank you for indulging me!
Jen

Veröffentlicht am 05.12.2011 12:44:52 GMT+01:00
Seriously meint:
https://www.amazon.fr/dp/B0063I5WEM
Science teaches that modern humans originated in East Africa and spread from there to the rest of the world. The Bible teaches that humans originated in the Garden of Eden and spread from there to the rest of the world. It is almost universally assumed that, in terms of location of origins, these versions are in conflict. For the first time a book challenges this assumption by referring to the relevant verses of Genesis which give the names of the lands just outside Eden and the rivers flowing through them. The Table of the Nations in Genesis is then called upon to confirm the location of these lands, two of which are in the neighbourhood of Cush in East Africa. The results are confirmed by extra-Biblical Jewish tradition such as the Book of Jubilees and the Book of Enoch.

They are also confirmed, surprisingly, by Egyptian sacred texts such as the Book of the Dead, the Book of AmTuat and the Book of Gates. These books locate the Egyptian afterlife paradise in the Tuat or Netherworld. The geography of the Tuat turns out to be based on the lakes, mountains, mammals and birds of East Africa and not Egypt as generally assumed. Influences are traced, by the author, from Central Sudan and Upper Nubia into Lower Nubia and then Upper Egypt during the predynastic brought by the Followers of Horus. Egyptian kingship and the white crown are amongst the influences that the author postulates as coming from Central Sudan.

Every chapter reveals new and unique discoveries that will leave the reader with a completely revolutionary understanding of the origins of Egyptian civilisation and the Bible.

Veröffentlicht am 07.12.2011 10:56:02 GMT+01:00
bookmolly meint:
Perhaps not so much mystery but very entertaining - Elizabeth Peters. I especially like Amelia Peabody.

Veröffentlicht am 25.12.2011 23:28:09 GMT+01:00
Frohe Weihnachten! :)

I have another archaeology-related book: Lord St. Leger's Find, a traditional Regency romance (think Jane Austen), is available at 2,99. Description:

Aspiring archaeologist Melpomene Lowery has only two weeks to unearth a valuable antiquity before her London debut. Unfortunately, Lord St. Leger, the scholar helping her, treats her with arrogance. He believes she is like her sisters -- diehard coquettes who view archaeology only as a means to flirt. If St. Leger and Mellie can't reconcile their differences, they may overlook the greatest find of their lives: love.

Sample chapters here: http://www.jenmalin.com/lord-st-legers-find

Thank you for considering my books!
Jen

Veröffentlicht am 26.12.2011 19:00:48 GMT+01:00
Zuletzt vom Autor geändert am 26.12.2011 19:02:31 GMT+01:00
Roger Weston meint:
1. The Golden Catch
#28 in UK Kindle Store > Books > Fiction > Men's Adventure

Customer review:
"This is one of the best books I have read all year, and I couldn't put it down...if you like Clive Cussler, Matthew Reilly or Daniel Silva you will like this book, it had me gripped from page one and the ending is truly exciting."

2. The Assassin's Wife
#10 in UK Books > Crime, Thrillers & Mystery > Political

Customer review:
"This book grabbed me with the first sentence. It was adventure filled and thrilling."

Free Kindle download Dec. 25 - 29th.
The True Tale of Castaway Daniel Foss: A Short Story

Only 99 Euro on Kindle!

Veröffentlicht am 05.01.2012 03:45:11 GMT+01:00
In a related post on my blog this week, alternatives for those of us who may not be able to make it to Pompeii or Herculaneum this year: Did you know there are fabulous full-scale replicas of Roman villas in Aschaffenburg, Germany; Saratoga Springs, New York; and Malibu, California? More here: http://www.jenmalin.com/archives/848

There’s also a full-size recreation of the Parthenon in Nashville, Tennesee. If anyone knows of other similar places, I’d love to hear about them -- and visit someday. :)

Jen

Veröffentlicht am 14.01.2012 18:23:56 GMT+01:00
Zuletzt vom Autor geändert am 14.01.2012 18:25:14 GMT+01:00
Dunk's medieval hotel suite in The Five-Day Dig is based on the place where Hubby and I stayed outside of Rome a couple years ago. Actually built into the city wall of the Borgo in Ostia Antica, the Delfina Suite at Hotel Rodrigo de Vivar provides an adventure in itself. I've never heard spookier noises anywhere. More on my blog at http://bit.ly/ybOEGn if you're interested.

Those of you who like ghost stories, please check out my contemporary romance featuring a Victorian ghost, Eternally Yours.

By the way, if you're an Amazon Prime member, The Five-Day Dig is now in the lending program, along with my Regency romance novella, A Perfect Duet.

Enjoy your weekend!
Jen

Veröffentlicht am 21.01.2012 15:07:07 GMT+01:00
[Vom Autor gelöscht am 23.01.2012 03:19:49 GMT+01:00]

Antwort auf einen früheren Beitrag vom 23.01.2012 12:02:13 GMT+01:00
You seem to be a Christian American. Please stop talking such nonsense!!!!! All you prove is that you are a believer. My answer can only be: the earth is not flat, the stars tell not my future, Mary is not a virgin and Jesus was a Jewish Rabbi - perhaps a scientific training and research methology would stop you from such statements, which are acceptable in the USA. Are you still in the DARK AGES there? You remind me of readers of Dan Brown who take the details of his story as true.

Antwort auf einen früheren Beitrag vom 23.01.2012 12:03:28 GMT+01:00
great entertainment! more of this quality please! so many historical books are written by peole who have not really any accurate knowledge of the time they are writng about

Antwort auf einen früheren Beitrag vom 23.01.2012 12:11:53 GMT+01:00
yes, this, what I call Disney archaeology , can be found in many places. Carnuntum, residence of Marcus Aurelius, has now rebuilt and furnished houses. the quality of it can not do justice to the real thing ( a question of budget). Our ideas of the past are shaped by Hollywood movies. Have they not the money to pay some scientists to advise them? Troja was awful to bear, Vikings do not have such funny helmets and Romans did not wear bedsheets. I saw many buildings in China which were destroyed during the cultural revolution, which have been rebuilt and unsuspecting tourists take them for the real thing.

Antwort auf einen früheren Beitrag vom 04.02.2012 18:22:50 GMT+01:00
Yes, when I learned that the amphitheater at Ostia is largely rebuilt, I was disappointed that it wasn't original. And, apparently, even a lot of Pompeii has been rebuilt, especially after the bombing in WWII.

On the other hand, if a reproduction isn't trying to hide the fact that it isn't original (like the Getty Villa, for example), it can be a great way to get an idea what the original looked like in its day.

But, yes, you're right: In our imaginations, we tend to glorify the past instead of seeing it "warts and all." : )

Jen

Veröffentlicht am 05.02.2012 12:57:15 GMT+01:00
I agree with much of what is being said, especially about the way hollywood treats historical fact, even in fantasy films. As a former British Museum Guide in the Egyptian galleries, I cring when, for example, in the film "The Mummy" they show Imhotep gazing out at Thebes and show some Pyramids!! This is just blatantly wrong. This is one of the reasons I wrote my book, the action adventure, The Warriors of Amun, which while a work of fiction, many of the references are historically accurate. Indeed some readers have said that they have been usin g google to learn more about the myths, locations and references I have included. It's currently no 4 in the action adventure bestselling free download list in the UK. It is still FREE GRATIS today to download, before going back to list price tomorrow.
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