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Wonderland (Englisch) Gebundene Ausgabe – 17. März 2009


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Produktinformation

  • Gebundene Ausgabe: 160 Seiten
  • Verlag: Disney Press (17. März 2009)
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ISBN-10: 142310451X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1423104513
  • Vom Hersteller empfohlenes Alter: 11 - 13 Jahre
  • Größe und/oder Gewicht: 18,1 x 2,5 x 27 cm
  • Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung: 4.0 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (1 Kundenrezension)
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: Nr. 598.865 in Fremdsprachige Bücher (Siehe Top 100 in Fremdsprachige Bücher)

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2 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von Parka TOP 500 REZENSENT am 8. Juli 2009
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
Länge: 0:10 Minuten
Tommy Kovac and Sonny Liew present a different take on Alice's Wonderland with a story told from the point of Mary Ann, housemaid of White Rabbit.

The adventure starts when Mary Ann goes on the run after hitting the Queen of Spades (accidentally) for dirtying her apron. We then follow the adventures of Mary Ann and White Rabbit as they journey through the magical world, interacting with the very other amusing characters.

The story is light-hearted and reads fast. Sonny Liew's sketchy and colourful style work very well here. Wonderland is always changing, nothing is certain, just as implied by the sketchy hurried lines, spotted backgrounds. There's also a certain manga element into Mary Ann's character, such as using multiple dots to simulate running and the nose-less portrait. The set and other characters are also very well designed. There's a good sense of personality in all the characters.

Overall, it's a very nice comic worth checking out, especially so when all the single issues are now collected in one volume.

There are more pictures of the book on my blog. Just visit my Amazon profile for the link.
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Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen auf Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 15 Rezensionen
9 von 10 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Lewis Carroll Would Approve! 18. März 2009
Von Silas Sparkhammer - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe Verifizierter Kauf
There seems to be a fad recently for "Alice in Wonderland" spin-off comics that are in the "horror" genre. Hideous, ghoulish, and ugly. But "Wonderland" by Kovac and Liew is charming, gentle, witty, and -- as were Carroll's original books -- "Highly Illogical" -- in the best possible way! The choice of protagonist -- Mary Ann, the White Rabbit's young housemaid -- is a stroke of purest genius. As a native of Wonderland, she is "at home" with the zany leaps of linguistic nonsense which were so perplexing to Alice.
The art is obviously dependent on the Disney version of "Alice in Wonderland," with recognizeably the same Queen of Hearts, Cheshire Cat, Mad Hatter, etc. But the story veers away from the lurid, "cuckoo for cocoa puffs" inanity of the movie, and is of a more genteel, more thoughtful, and far more literate style. It is a romp, to be sure, but more truly dreamlike and less garishly nightmarish than the Disney classic.
At first the art seems sketchy, loose, unfinished, as if the inks and pencils hadn't quite been finalized. After a very short time, this looseness will endear itself to you, and you will begin to see Liew's mastery, a style that is suggestive more than declarative.
6 von 7 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Intriguing 8. Juli 2009
Von Parka - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe Verifizierter Kauf
Tommy Kovac and Sonny Liew present a different take on Alice's Wonderland with a story told from the point of Mary Ann, housemaid of White Rabbit.

The adventure starts when Mary Ann goes on the run after hitting the Queen of Spades (accidentally) for dirtying her apron. We then follow the adventures of Mary Ann and White Rabbit as they journey through the magical world, interacting with the very other amusing characters.

The story is light-hearted and reads fast. Sonny Liew's sketchy and colourful style work very well here. Wonderland is always changing, nothing is certain, just as implied by the sketchy hurried lines, spotted backgrounds. There's also a certain manga element into Mary Ann's character, such as using multiple dots to simulate running and the nose-less portrait. The set and other characters are also very well designed. There's a good sense of personality in all the characters.

Overall, it's a very nice comic worth checking out, especially so when all the single issues are now collected in one volume.

(More pictures are available on my blog. Just visit my Amazon profile for the link.)
5 von 6 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Feed your head 18. März 2009
Von E. R. Bird - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
It's amazing how many artists, authors, filmmakers, poets, and creative personalities feel a need to put their own distinctive stamp on Alice's Wonderland. From creative stage productions to creepy films to horrible television shows, there's just something about Alice. She casts a spell over us. Lewis Carroll knew not what he wrought when he brought Wonderland into our world, and various Wonderland-related permutations have continued unabated ever since. The newest addition to the Alice oeuvre, however, doesn't feature that white pinafored girl at all. Author Tommy Kovac and Sonny Liew had an entirely new spin in mind when they produced six single-issue comics simply entitled Wonderland. I ask you this: Who is the one character in the original story that is alluded to and but never seen? If you'll cast your mind back it will come to you. Mary Ann. The White Rabbit at one point mistakes Alice for his own maid. So without further ado Kovac and Liew decided to tell her story, now collected in a single handsome volume for public consumption. Wonderland has its own missteps and shortcomings, but by and large it comes off as a pleasant ode to Carroll's vision, with a fun storyline and art that stands up to its material.

Cast your mind back to the story of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. This is the tale of the maid, Mary Ann. Returning to the White Rabbit's home, Mary Ann hears conflicting reports of an "Alice monster" that wreaked havoc throughout the kingdom in her absence. When a misunderstanding leads to the Queen of Hearts mistaking the White Rabbit as a traitor, it's up to Mary Ann and the rabbit to escape not just the queen, but a Jabberwocky, a Cheshire Cat, and the sudden shocking appearance of the Queen of Spades. Worst of all, some of the local animalia are under the distinct impression that Mary Ann will fill Alice's shoes (so to speak) and go against the monarchy. Quite a lot to deal with for a girl who feels more comfortable cleaning palaces than living in them.

When you think of Carroll-inspired comics, your mind goes one of two ways. Either you will start to imagine something like Brian Talbott's jaw-droppingly lovely Alice In Sunderland (a must-purchase for any true Alice fan) or you will think of the various lamentable manga editions of the original story, utterly lacking in creativity or wit. Wonderland is different. Right from the start it throws you off with a girl dressed not unlike Alice but in what is clearly a maid's attire. Then you notice that there's a distinctive Disney-like smell to the enterprise, but to what extent does the book owe its characters' personalities to Disney's version of the tale? Well, there is look of each character right off the bat. The Cheshire Cat is the same purple and pink striped trickster from Disney's film (sans the Sterling Holloway voice, of course). The caterpillar is now a butterfly, also per the movie. Really, everyone looks similar to their Disneyfied counterpart, but it's not as if they are stills lifted from the movie. Artist Liew has given each one his own distinctive touch. They've been elongated, stretched, and manipulated. They wear the colors of Disney, but the flavor is distinctly different.

What's more, as an artist Liew has a keen sense of how to produce a good comic. He's received Eisner nominations before, and some may be best familiar with his work on the Flight anthologies. His panels constantly change angles and views of the action. He's a real fan of the sudden silhouette, and there's even a hint of manga about his surprised Mary Ann. The result is a lush, handsome hardcover volume, full of color and thick sturdy pages. One does wonder who inked and colored this book (it gives no indication) so we will just have to assume that that was Mr. Liew as well.

There is a bit of Disney influence beyond the look, however. Certainly it does not care to introduce many characters from the original story that did not make the movie's cut. You will find no Griffin. No Mock Turtle. No Dodo. You do, however, get to see the Duchess and the Cook, neither of whom ever made the original cut. There is a Jabberwock, a strange cousin to Tenniel's original. And the three little girls who lived at the bottom of a treacle well? They may be my favorite characters here, being that they are creepy as all get out.

Kovac's writing isn't particularly Carroll-esque, which is fine. It doesn't have to be. He does make the occasional lunge for a Carroll-like sensibility, however. There is at least one original poem in this book that seems somewhat inspired by the original Alice, but Kovac is really at his best when he has characters making off-handed comments. For example, when the Queen of Spades commands Mary Ann to recite a poem her response is, "Oh, I never learnt anything fun or frivolous as a poem. But I could recite instructions on how to get hair-oil stains out of an antimacassar." That kind of thing. I like Kovac best when he's at his most peculiar. I would have liked him to pluck out more words like "antimacassar" and sprinkle them about the text too.

As for the story itself, it's fine. The central point is whether or not Mary Ann would consent to ruling Wonderland if the other kings and queens were gone. She seemingly receives help from the never visualized Alice in this reluctant quest, which is more than a bit confusing. I appreciated that Alice, by this point, is now onto her Looking Glass adventure and has no need to return to Wonderland. Just the same, it's not entirely realistic that Alice would even know who Mary Ann was, let alone aid her in any manner. That's just one brief problem with the conclusion, however. By and large it holds together. The ending is a bit jumbled (throwing in a Cheshire Cat psychedelic experience is fairly unnecessary) but not too damaging.

On the back of the dust jacket for Wonderland there sits a quote from Carroll's original text. "And what is the use of a book," thought Alice "without pictures or conversation?" Clever jacks. They knew what they were up to. Altogether Wonderland acts as a rather good introduction to the proper Alice in Wonderland in addition to being a fun story in and of itself. As for the Disney-look of the piece, be so good as to remember that Dali himself had a hand in that particular version. The newest addition to the Alice oeuvre, and certainly worth a peek.
1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Wonderland without Alice 20. Juni 2009
Von Brent R. Swanson - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
I was a bit uneasy when cracking open this book. Sequels by other authors are a risky business, particularly with something like Carroll's "Wonderland" books, which hold a self-contained story that doesn't lend itself to sequels, or even to adaptations (the memory of John Tenniel's Queen of Hearts has returned to behead many a successor in movies and on the page). Even the staff of Western Publications, who mixed and matched dozens of Disneyfied characters from children's literature, did very little with the Disneyfied "Wonderland" stable.

So it's something of a minor miracle that Tommy Kovac and Sonny Liew pull off this sort-of sequel with so much success. This is due in large part to the hitherto unseen character of Mary Ann, the White Rabbit's housekeeper. When Mary Ann rescues the White Rabbit from the Queen's wrath and axe, she finds herself meeting many of the familiar Wonderland residents as well as the fearsome Jabberwocky and the imprisoned Queen (and King) of Spades. Mary Ann has pluck and resourcefulness to match Alice, but she is her own character and not a repetition of Carroll's. Similarly, the art recalls both Tenniel's and the Disney Studio's (Alice's brief reappearance provides the biggest debt to Disney), but it is distinctively Liew's.

And the story reads much better collected than it would in installments, where the convoluted thread could easly be lost from month to month. This tale is nearly as good a way to revisit Wonderland as rereading the original adventures.
1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
'One Of Them Girly-Type Faces' 7. Juni 2010
Von Larissa - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
When Alice followed a talking white rabbit down a rabbit hole the events that followed became well known, but not only in our world. Wonderland was a world changed as Alice had left behind her a land in chaos and a kingdom now full of the curious.

But the most intriguing and unanswered question to arise from Alice's Adventure In Wonderland is the curious manner in which the white rabbit refers to Alice as Mary Ann. Just who is this Mary Ann and why is does the white rabbit insist Alice is she?

Would it surprise you to learn that, like Alice, Mary Ann was a girl who wore some sort of dress and had some sort of hair on her head. Under such circumstances could the white rabbit really be blamed for getting the two mixed up?

But then Alice turned out to be some sort of monster, creating chaos and in-sighting curiosity, while Mary Ann is but a humble and orderly maid who loves noting more then to clean and tidy. However when it comes down to it are Alice and Mary Ann really so different.

Wonderland is a graphic novel that tells the story of the elusive Mary Ann and what life was like for those in Wonderland after Alice. A combination of the comic book issues that comprised the Wonderland comic series are brought together in this vivid and intriguing hardcover edition. A quirky and curious tale for all those to dare to know more.
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