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Wolf Hall (Man Booker Prize) (Englisch) Gebundene Ausgabe – 13. Oktober 2009


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Produktinformation

  • Gebundene Ausgabe: 532 Seiten
  • Verlag: Henry Holt (13. Oktober 2009)
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ISBN-10: 0805080686
  • ISBN-13: 978-0805080681
  • Größe und/oder Gewicht: 16,6 x 4,5 x 24,1 cm
  • Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung: 4.0 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (44 Kundenrezensionen)
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: Nr. 13.240 in Fremdsprachige Bücher (Siehe Top 100 in Fremdsprachige Bücher)

Mehr über den Autor

Hilary Mantel wurde 1952 in Glossop, England, geboren. Nach dem Jura-Studium in London war sie als Sozialarbeiterin tätig. Sie lebte fünf Jahre lang in Botswana und vier Jahre in Saudi-Arabien. Für den Roman >Wölfe< (DuMont 2010) wurde sie 2009 mit dem Booker-Preis, dem wichtigsten britischen Literaturpreis, ausgezeichnet. Mit >Falken<, dem zweiten Band der Tudor-Trilogie, gewann Hilary Mantel 2012 den Booker bereits zum zweiten Mal. Die deutsche Übersetzung erschien im Frühjahr 2013 im DuMont Buchverlag, wo auch ihr Roman >Brüder< (2012) erschien.

Produktbeschreibungen

Pressestimmen

"Hilary Mantel's Wolf Hall is a startling achievement, a brilliant historical novel focused on the rise to power of a figure exceedingly unlikely, on the face of things, to arouse any sympathy at all . . . . This is a novel too in which nothing is wasted, and nothing completely disappears."—Stephen Greenblatt, The New York Review of Books

"On the origins of this once-world-shaking combat, with its still-vivid acerbity and cruelty, Hilary Mantel has written a historical novel of quite astonishing power. . . . With breathtaking subtlety—one quite ceases to notice the way in which she takes on the most intimate male habits of thought and speech—Mantel gives us a Henry who is sexually pathetic, and who needs a very down-to-earth counselor. . . . The means by which Mantel grounds and anchors her action so convincingly in the time she describes, while drawing so easily upon the past and hinting so indirectly at the future, put her in the very first rank of historical novelists. . . . Wolf Hall is a magnificent service to the language and literature whose early emancipation it depicts and also, in its demystifying of one of history's wickedest men, a service to the justice that Josephine Tey first demanded in The Daughter of Time."—Christopher Hitchens, The Atlantic

"Whether we accept Ms Mantel's reading of history or not, her characters have a lifeblood of their own . . . . a Shakespearean vigour. Stylistically, her fly-on-the-wall approach is achieved through the present tense, of which she is a master. Her prose is muscular, avoiding cod Tudor dialogue and going for direct modern English. The result is Ms Mantel's best novel yet."—The Economist

"A novel both fresh and finely wrought: a brilliant portrait of a society in the throes of disorienting change, anchored by a penetrating character study of Henry's formidable advisor, Thomas Cromwell. It's no wonder that her masterful book just won this year's Booker Prize . . . [Mantel's prose is] extraordinarily flexible, subtle, and shrewd."—Wendy Smith, The Washington Post

"[Mantel's] interest is in the question of good and evil as it applies to people who wield great power. That means anguish, exultation, deals, spies, decapitations, and fabulous clothes . . . She always goes for color, richness, music. She has read Shakespeare closely. One also hears the accents of the young James Joyce."—Joan Acocella, The New Yorker

"Dazzling . . . .Thomas Cromwell remains a controversial and mysterious figure. Mantel has filled in the blanks plausibly, brilliantly. Wolf Hall has epic scale but lyric texture. Its 500-plus pages turn quickly, winged and falconlike . . . . both spellbinding and believable."—Christopher Benfey, The New York Times Book Review

"Mantel's abilities to channel the life and lexicon of the past are nothing short of astonishing. She burrows down through the historical record to uncover the tiniest, most telling details, evoking the minutiae of history as vividly as its grand sweep. The dialogue is so convincing that she seems to have been, in another life, a stenographer taking notes in the taverns and palaces of England."—Ross King, Los Angeles Times

"Darkly magnificent . . . Instead of bringing the past to us, her writing, brilliant and black, launches us disconcertingly into the past. We are space-time travelers landed in an alien world . . . history is a feast whose various and vital excitements and intrigues make the book a long and complex pleasure."—Richard Eder, The Boston Globe

"Arch, elegant, richly detailed . . . [Wolf Hall's] main characters are scorchingly well rendered. And their sharp-clawed machinations are presented with nonstop verve in a book that can compress a wealth of incisiveness into a very few well-chosen words . . . Deft and diabolical as they are, Ms. Mantel's slyly malicious turns of phrase . . . succinctly capture the important struggles that have set her characters talking."—Janet Maslin, The New York Times

"The essential Mantel element . . . is a style—of writing and of thinking—that combines steely-eyed intelligence with intense yet wide-ranging sympathy. This style implies enormous respect for her readers, as if she believes that we are as intelligent and empathetic as she is, and one of the acute pleasures of reading her books is that we sometimes find ourselves living up to those expectations. . . . If you are anything like me, you will finish Wolf Hall wishing it were twice as long as its 560 pages. Torn away from this sixteenth-century world, in which you have come to know the engaging, pragmatic Cromwell as if he were your own brother—as if he were yourself—you will turn to the Internet to find out more about him . . . But none of this, however instructive will make up for your feeling of loss, because none of this additional material will come clothed in the seductive, inimitable language of Mantel's great fiction."—Wendy Lesser, Bookforum

"Mantel sets a new standard for historical fiction with her latest novel Wolf Hall, a riveting portrait of Thomas Cromwell . . . Mantel's crystalline style, piercing eye and interest in, shall we say, the darker side of human nature, together with a real respect for historical accuracy, make this novel an engrossing, enveloping read."—BookPage

"The story of Cromwell's rise shimmers in Ms. Mantel's spry intelligent prose . . . [Mantel] leaches out the bones of the story as it is traditionally known, and presents to us a phantasmagoric extravaganza of the characters' plans and ploys, toils and tactics."—Washington Times

"Historical fiction at its finest, Wolf Hall captures the character of a nation and its people. It exemplifies something that has lately seemed as mythical as those serpent princesses: the great English novel."—Bloomberg News

"There are no new stories, only new ways of telling them. Set during Henry VIII's tumultuous, oft-covered reign, this epic novel . . . proves just how inspired a fresh take can be. [Mantel] is an author as audacious as Anne [Boleyn] herself, imagining private conversations between public figures and making it read as if she had a glass to the wall."—People Magazine (four stars, People Pick)

"Fans of historical fiction—or great writing—should howl with delight."—USA Today

"[Mantel] wades into the dark currents of 16th century English politics to sculpt a drama and a protagonist with a surprisingly contemporary feel . . . Wolf Hall is sometimes an ambitious read. But it is a rewarding one as well."—Marjorie Kehe, The Christian Science Monitor

"This masterwork is full of gems for the careful reader. The recurring details alone . . . shine through like some kind of Everyman's poetry. Plainspoken and occasionally brutal, Wolf Hall is both as complex and as powerful as its subject, as messy as life itself."—Clea Simon, The Boston Phoenix

"Reader, you're in excellent hands with Hilary Mantel . . . for this thrumming, thrilling read. . . . Part of the delight of masterfully paced Wolf Hall is how utterly modern it feels. It is political intrigue pulsing with energy and peopled by historical figures who have never seemed more alive—and more human."—Ellen Kanner, Miami Herald

"Wolf Hall is a solid historical novel that's also a compelling read . . . Mantel's narrative manages to be both rich and lean: there's plenty of detail, but it's not piled in endless paragraphs. The plot flows swiftly from one development to the next."—David Loftus, The Oregonian

"[Mantel] seamlessly blends fiction and history and creates a stunning story of Tudor England . . . . With its excellent plotting and riveting dialogue, Wolf Hall is a gem of a novel that is both accurate and gripping."—Cody Corliss, St. Louis Post-Dispatch

"[A] spirited novel . . . . Mantel has a solid grasp of court politics and a knack for sharp, cutting dialogue."—Thom Geier, Entertainment Weekly

"This is in all respects a superior work of fiction, peopled with appealing characters living through a period of tense high drama‚There will be few novels this year as good as this one."—Library Journal, starred review

"Mixing fiction with fact, Mantel captures the atmosphere of the times and brings to life the important players."—Publishers Weekly

Synopsis

A magisterial new novel that takes us behind the scenes during one of the most formative periods in English history: the reign of Henry VIII. Wolf Hall is told mainly through the eyes of Thomas Cromwell, a self-made man who rose from a blacksmith's son in Putney to be the most powerful man in England after the king. The cast also includes Cardinal Wolsey, Thomas More, Anne Boleyn and Henry's other wives - and, of course, King Henry himself. It was a time when a half-made society was making itself with great passion and suffering and courage; a time when those involved in the art of the possible were servants to masters only interested in glorious gestures; a time when the very idea of social progress, and of a better world, was fresh, alien and threatening. It was a time of men who weren't like us, but who were creating us. -- Dieser Text bezieht sich auf eine vergriffene oder nicht verfügbare Ausgabe dieses Titels.

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Kundenrezensionen

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46 von 47 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von marmaladecat am 13. Oktober 2009
Format: Taschenbuch
I have just finished this book and am suffering from withdrawal symptoms! It is quite simply a masterpiece, one of those rare historical novels that not only instructs but also inspires and entertains with intelligence, sympathy and humour. Hilary Mantel has not only succeeded in bringing to life and making relevant in a contemporary context, someone who lived nearly 500 years ago but also humanising one of Britain's most controversial historical personalities. Growing up a Catholic, I always regarded Thomas Cromwell as an evil reformer who was instrumental in the execution of the innocent, principled Thomas More. However, reading this book, I defy anyone not to fall under his spell. Every sentence is supremely crafted, there is nothing to jar a superlative reading experience. Many reviewers critise the length of the novel, however, for me, this is only positive - I just didn't want it to end and cannot wait for its sequel, despite my knowing what will come next (poor, poor Thomas, Henry VIII really was a fiend). I would not only highly recommend the book to fans of this historical period, but also to anyone with no interest or prior knowledge of it, I really cannot see how anyone would be sorry they picked it up. I can now add Hilary Mantel to my list of inspiring authors, I was not familiar with her previous work and am keen to get to know her writing better.
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29 von 31 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von Amelrode am 20. April 2009
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
The 500 anniversary of Henry VIII's birth has triggered a real flood of books on the Tudors and the whole period. This period of English history had always been my favourite. So I just love it.

However Thomas Cromwell, Henry's chief ministers and the architect of Reform, had always been a bit elusive. So I am very happy that Hilary Mantel has made him the subject of her monumental novel.

Hilary Mantel has immersed herself into the period and indeed managed to re-created this very time when society changed so much. It is convincing and engaging, but not in an easy manner. She does not tell the story in a very simplistic way. Instead she chooses to show the different layers and the complications and I feel thereby gets very close to the challenges of the time. That does not make necessarily an easy reading, but a rewarding one as one gains a better understanding of the time. Cromwell and his personality became for the first time alive for me. Historic novels are a great tool to show a period or personality as the author sees him or her without being too closely tied to historic evidence. I believe Hilary Mantel has done that to perfection. She has given us her take on Cromwell and the Tudor period.

Wolf Hall, the seat of the Seymours, is for me a symbol for the future, the protestant future as here Queen Jane, mother of the first protestant King Edward VI, lived. And btw Cromwell's son and heir Gregory married Elisabeth Seymour, sister to Queen Jane and the Lord Protector The Duke of Somerset.

All in all, this is an enjoyable but long read (more than 650 pages).
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15 von 16 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von Donald Mitchell TOP 500 REZENSENT am 2. Mai 2010
Format: Audio CD
"The king spoke, saying to the wise men of Babylon, 'Whoever reads this writing, and tells me its interpretation, shall be clothed with purple and have a chain of gold around his neck; and he shall be the third ruler in the kingdom.'" -- Daniel 5:7 (NKJV)

Despite the elaborate praise that has accompanied Wolf Hall, I found it hard to get excited about the prospect of reading once again about Henry the Eighth. Within a few pages, I was totally disarmed by Hilary Mantel's unique story-telling style. She moves away from what historians focus on (the big events and the most powerful people) to emphasize character as portrayed in the little events. As a result, Henry the Eighth is at the edge of this book, rather than in the center.

Wolf Hall is primarily the story of Thomas Cromwell and his pursuit of helpful solutions for all those he comes into contact with, provided in the context of utter loyalty . . . first to Cardinal Wolsey and later to Henry the Eighth, Anne Boleyn, and those who depend on Cromwell.

The book is so wonderfully subtle that I found myself rereading many sections, smiling at the various ways that story threads are developed (usually in several ways, overtly and subtly, at the same time). As a result, the story is fresh, new, and very interesting both for content and style.

After reading about half the book, I had an epiphany . . . This book was also designed to be improved by being read aloud, as are all of the best novels. I managed to find a copy of Simon Slater's reading of the unabridged version and was wonderfully rewarded by listening to what I had just read. It was four times better as a recording than in my silent reading.

I recommend you forget reading the book and just listen to it instead. You'll be amazed.
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5 von 5 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von Valentine am 22. September 2011
Format: Taschenbuch
Romane über Heinrich VIII. und seine Zeit gibt es wie Sand am Meer, doch dieses Buch war für mich das erste, in dem Thomas Cromwell im Mittelpunkt stand. Geboren als Sohn eines Schmieds, der ihn misshandelte, ging er schon früh ins Ausland, bereiste insbesondere Flandern und Italien und wurde ein erfolgreicher Kaufmann. Nach seiner Rückkehr nach England begann sein politischer Aufstieg, der ihn schließlich in verschiedene Ämter am Hof Heinrichs führte. Der Handwerkerssohn aus einfachen Verhältnissen ist ein versierter Strippenzieher hinter den Kulissen und versteht es, sich geschickt aus diversen Quellen Informationen zu beschaffen. Als Heinrich sich von seiner ersten Frau scheiden lassen will, um Anne Boleyn zu ehelichen, und dies zur Zerreißprobe für sein Königreich wird, ist Cromwell einer seiner wichtigsten Berater ...

Die Handlung dieses von Personen und Ereignissen geradezu überquellenden Romans lässt sich kaum in wenigen Worten zusammenfassen. Wir lernen Cromwell als gequälten kleinen Jungen kennen und treffen ihn danach erst wieder, als er, erwachsen und reich an Auslandserfahrung, wieder in die Heimat zurückkehrt, eine Familie gründet und allmählich Gefallen an der Politik findet. Es sind bewegte Zeiten, nicht nur aufgrund der Geschehnisse am Hof und der internationalen Verwicklungen, sondern auch wegen immer wieder auftretender Seuchen und des aufkommenden Protestantismus, der noch als Ketzerei gilt und erbarmungslos verfolgt wird.

In einer Fülle kleiner, sehr eindringlich geschilderter Szenen und Dialoge wird das London um 1530 mit seinen Sinneseindrücken, Ereignissen und Personen eindringlich zum Leben erweckt.
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