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Winesburg, Ohio (Penguin Twentieth Century Classics) (Englisch) Taschenbuch – 1. September 1992


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Produktinformation

  • Taschenbuch: 256 Seiten
  • Verlag: Penguin Classics; Auflage: Reissue (1. September 1992)
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ISBN-10: 0140186557
  • ISBN-13: 978-0140186550
  • Vom Hersteller empfohlenes Alter: Ab 18 Jahren
  • Größe und/oder Gewicht: 13,2 x 1,2 x 19,8 cm
  • Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung: 4.4 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (26 Kundenrezensionen)
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: Nr. 245.597 in Fremdsprachige Bücher (Siehe Top 100 in Fremdsprachige Bücher)
  • Komplettes Inhaltsverzeichnis ansehen

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Produktbeschreibungen

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Library Journal praised this edition of Sherwood Anderson's famed short stories as "the finest edition of this seminal work available." Reconstructed to be as close to the original text as possible, Winesburg, Ohio depicts the strange, secret lives of the inhabitants of a small town. In "Hands," Wing Biddlebaum tries to hide the tale of his banishment from a Pennsylvania town, a tale represented by his hands. In "Adventure," lonely Alice Hindman impulsively walks naked into the night rain. Threaded through the stories is the viewpoint of George Willard, the young newspaper reporter who, like his creator, stands witness to the dark and despairing dealings of a community of isolated people. -- Dieser Text bezieht sich auf eine vergriffene oder nicht verfügbare Ausgabe dieses Titels.

Pressestimmen

“A work of love, an attempt to break down the walls that divide one person from another, and also, in its own fashion, a celebration of small-town life in the lost days of goodwill and innocence.”—Malcolm Cowley
 
“He was the father of my whole generation of writers.”—William Faulkner
-- Dieser Text bezieht sich auf eine vergriffene oder nicht verfügbare Ausgabe dieses Titels.

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In diesem Buch (Mehr dazu)
Einleitungssatz
Rereading Sherwood Anderson after many years, one feels again that his work is desperately uneven, but one is gratified to find that the best of it is as new and springlike as ever. Lesen Sie die erste Seite
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Kundenrezensionen

4.4 von 5 Sternen

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3 von 3 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von Franklyn am 1. Januar 2000
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
Sherwood Anderson's "Winesburg Ohio" is a poignant and evocative look behind the face of small town America early in this century. The message in this book is not "It's A Wonderful Life", but rather that "It's A Disappointing Life". The writing is eloquent yet simple and conveys the quiet yearnings of the human soul that we all feel from time to time. There is an air of melancholy to the book as the inhabitants are shown to be almost uniformly incapable of expressing their deepest longings, as their dreams are at first deferred, then sadly and ultimately denied. If ever a town needed Jimmy Stewart this is it. Along with James Joyce's "The Dubliners"(1914), and Jean Toomer's "Cane"(1923), "Winesburg Ohio" (1919) forms a trilogy of beautifully written short stories/novellas about a particular city or region. A modern day equivalent would be "Drown", Junot Diaz's stories of Dominicans in the Dominican Republic and New York. And while, Joyce, Toomer, and Diaz are more innovative with language and form than Anderson, all four give revealing character studies of the inhabitants as they go about their daily, ordinary lives, and make you reflect on your own hopes, dreams, and realities.
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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von Douglas A. Greenberg am 13. Juni 1999
Format: Taschenbuch
In the context of today's tell-all society, the kinds of human revelations and insights that Sherwood Anderson wove into the Winesburg stories may seem tame and even pedestrian. But at the time, few good writers were even attempting to penetrate into the "real life" experience of ordinary Americans. His efforts so many years ago are all the more valuable today, however, since it provides us a glimpse of what life was *really* like for some people in much-romanticized "small town America."
This novel is really a collection of loosely interrelated short stories, or perhaps even a series of character sketches, but so what? The value here is in the individual images and insights that Anderson provides, not in any emergent "plot."
The glimpses into the inner lives of ordinary Americans and the fine descriptions of place, mood, and events that Anderson provides in this work still speak to some readers, at least, today. I thoroughly enjoyed this book.
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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von Andy Todes am 19. April 2000
Format: Taschenbuch
three, four, five times. maybe more. "winesburg, ohio" is a transcendent reading experience. the equivalent, perhaps, of peering through a magnificent kaleidoscope and watching the colors and patterns turn one way, then the other. by turns funny, sad, but mostly tragic, anderson takes us on a guided tour of a small mid-western town. each vignette, weighing in at merely ten pages apiece, is a jewel of understatement. the language, simple and poetic, is a dream. beyond a dream. and it packs a heartache as real as anything you'll find in a book 5 times its size. the real marvel, however, is when you flip to the beginning and start all over again.
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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von Luis Méndez am 4. Juni 2000
Format: Taschenbuch
se que debo volver a leer esta serie de cuentos entrelazados de nuevo y de nuevo, como se que debo volver sobre el camino andado a ver que se me ha perdido. este libro, lleno de pequenas historias y de maniaticos simpaticos que lo rodean, muestra sin embargo una bella inocencia y una bella prosa que hace a uno sentirse bien. el joven narrador anda a traves del pueblo y al final parte lleno de historias a hacer la suya propia. por favor no se lo pierdan es buenisimo LUIS MENDEZ
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Von Ein Kunde am 10. November 1999
Format: Taschenbuch
After reading the reviews on this web site, I decided to throw my two cents' worth in. I had never heard of Sherwood Anderson, and was extremely surprised by this book. Whether you consider it a novel or a collection of short stories, it is eloquent in its simplicity and effiency of language. One of the reviews on this site calls Anderson's use of language uninventive and not very evocative, proving that styles have changed considerably in the past hundred years. Have we reached the point where we need new "inventive" language to relate to others? In this modern age, we have become too reliant on modifying language -- and word-forms -- to fit our "writing," rather than using words as a tool to express ourselves. If you are truly looking for inventive language, pick up a magazine, they're infamous for "creating" new abuses of English. Anderson's real achievement is his eloquence. In the story "Hands," for instance, Anderson creates an incredibly poignant and powerful tale within the space of a few pages. I have read many entire books that didn't have a fraction of the emotion Anderson consistently packs into these brief stories. The subject matter may not seem as scandalous, but bear in mind, this was written close to one hundred years ago. Besides which, if it is scandal you are seeking, I again refer you to the world of magazines. As for an eloquent sketch of both character and setting, Winesburg, Ohio speaks for itself.
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Format: Taschenbuch
When I discovered this book, I was already writing a story cycle of my own, The Acorn Stories. Winesburg, Ohio became a strong influence on that book, and also led me to write New Readings of Winesburg, Ohio. In Sherwood Anderson's acclaimed story cycle, a small town finds itself entering the twentieth century with loneliness and confusion. The same industrialism that Anderson would explore so well in his novel Poor White also asserts itself constantly here, turning a beautiful landscape into a sometimes desecrated one.
The young reporter George Willard appears in most of the stories, providing a connection for people who feel they lack connection and a voice for people who feel they lack a voice. Though many readers consider this book a bleak and disjointed novel, I consider it a collection of stories that interrelate in surprising, often brilliant ways. As for the bleak part, please also look at the many moments of comfort, the many sparks of inspiration.
I eventually lost track of how many times I read Winesburg, Ohio. I just know I'll read it again.
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