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Why I am an Atheist Who Believes in God: How to give love, create beauty and find peace (English Edition) [Kindle Edition]

Frank Schaeffer

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Produktbeschreibungen

Pressestimmen

“Part of the impact here, admittedly, is a result of who Frank Schaeffer is and of the platform from which he writes. That cannot obscure the fact, however—indeed, must not be allowed to obscure the fact—that in places this theological meditation cum memoir is arrestingly beautiful in and of itself, that it is, in fact, absolutely redolent of all the power that beautiful suggests. Schaeffer’s openness about his own wrestling with the concepts of God and god-ness which he inherited from his parents is heartrending at times, but it is also deadly honest and always unshielded. It is also balanced in a most gentle way by Schaeffer’s quiet defense of the traditional and his appreciation for its place in well-lived life. In fact, one leaves the final pages of WHY I AM AN ATHEIST WHO BELIEVES IN GOD aware yet once again that sometimes and in some circumstances, an artist is still the best theologian.” — Phyllis Tickle author of The Age of the Spirit

“Frank Schaeffer always writes well, but Why I Am an Atheist Who Believes In God is extraordinary. Somewhere between the sterile, absolute, and empty formulae of reductionist, totalitarian science and the earnest, hostile, excessively certain make-believe of religious fundamentalism, there is a beautiful place. There is room in this place for honesty. For tenderness. For fury. For wonder. For hope. For mistakes. For paradox. For grace. This book is written from that in-between place. It will help you get there too, if you're interested in finding it.” — Brian D. McLaren author/speaker/activist

“A delight and charmer of a read---deft insights, burnished gold probes, arrow hit bull’s eye well again and again.” — Ron Dart (Thomas Merton Society of Canada)

Kurzbeschreibung

WHY I AM AN ATHEIST WHO BELIEVES IN GOD
How to Create Beauty, Give Love and Find Peace
By
Frank Schaeffer



***

Caught between the beauty of his grandchildren and grief over a friend’s death, Frank Schaeffer finds himself simultaneously believing and not believing in God—an atheist who prays. Schaeffer wrestles with faith and disbelief, sharing his innermost thoughts with a lyricism that only great writers of literary nonfiction achieve. Schaeffer writes as an imperfect son, husband and grandfather whose love for his family, art and life trumps the ugly theologies of an angry God and the atheist vision of a cold, meaningless universe. Schaeffer writes that only when we abandon our hunt for certainty do we become free to create beauty, give love and find peace.



***


“As someone who has made redemption his work, Frank has, in fact, shown amazing grace.” — Jane Smiley, Washington Post


***

“To millions of evangelical Christians, the Schaeffer name is royal, and Frank is the reluctant, wayward, traitorous prince. His crime is not financial profligacy, like some pastors’ sons, but turning his back on Christian conservatives.” — New York Times


***

“Frank Schaeffer’s gifts as a writer are sensual and loving. He’s also laugh-out-loud funny!” — Andre Dubus III, author of House of Sand and Fog


Produktinformation

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • Dateigröße: 486 KB
  • Seitenzahl der Print-Ausgabe: 164 Seiten
  • ISBN-Quelle für Seitenzahl: 149595501X
  • Verlag: Frank Schaeffer; Auflage: 1 (15. Mai 2014)
  • Verkauf durch: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ASIN: B00KDOMMUO
  • Text-to-Speech (Vorlesemodus): Aktiviert
  • X-Ray:
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: #122.153 Bezahlt in Kindle-Shop (Siehe Top 100 Bezahlt in Kindle-Shop)

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Amazon.com: 4.2 von 5 Sternen  231 Rezensionen
59 von 64 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen I love it! 17. Mai 2014
Von Jennifer Henry - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch
I met Frank Schaeffer briefly last summer at a festival I was attending. I didn’t know very much about him at the time, other than he was the son of Francis and Edith Schaeffer. I have since read a few blog posts and heard friends talk about him. I had not read any of Frank’s books until this one. “Why I am an Atheist Who Believes in God” is beautifully written. Frank articulates the struggle between faith, doubt, and belief very well. I found myself drawn into his stories and thinking along the same lines throughout much of this book. I was encouraged by the story Frank shares of Holly and the eulogy her son, Noah, gave. “My mother’s creed was ‘create beauty, give love, find peace.’” And I agree with Frank that “That’s the best description of the point of living I’ve heard.” What I took away from reading “Why I am an Atheist Who Believes in God” is that what we think, know, or believe is of little importance in the art of creating beauty, giving love, and finding peace. In the end, what is important is who we are becoming.
I highly recommend reading this book.
*This is my first review of a book. I'm crossing that off my bucket list!
36 von 38 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen A Refreshing and Authentic Work of Faith 12. Mai 2014
Von Susan Barton - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch
As a chaplain, in a hospital, I work with people from all walks of life. And what I've learned to do is to "leave space" for the stories that I hear. I try to listen without judgement. But I know that my experience is different from most people. Many people seem to have room for only one way of understanding because they are so busy that they do not want to take the mental energy for "leaving space" because that means taking time to really listen to the story of the other and then taking time to sit with the difficult questions posed by listening. Frank's book has been a refreshing read for me as he states a lot of what I think on a given day. He seems to have lived with the weird, wrestled with it and now has come to a place of allowing space for it all. He seems OK with recognizing that he does not have all of the answers. "You will always embody contradiction he says," and to that I say "Yes!" And maybe what is most endearing to me about the book is the insights that Frank has received from his own grandchildren, "Lucy and Jack just accept that life is weird, wonderful and defined by imagination." He listens to them and allows their stories to help him make sense of this very weird world in which we live. I appreciate Frank's authentic voice and his courage for putting words to paper. I hope to use this book as a book study with others……..a springboard for talking about what is and what might be.
33 von 37 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Enjoyable and Thoughtful Read 10. Mai 2014
Von w brown - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch
I was fortunate to receive a digital review copy of this book and was engrossed from the first paragraph. Mr. Schaeffer has an engaging writing style. It seemed the book was like one of his paintings, with the subject his life journey so far and his words the paint. He writes as if having a real conversation with a good friend.

Mr. Schaeffer is Eastern Orthodox and writes from a “progressive” Christian outlook. It seems this faith perspective allows him to openly explore doubts about God, hence the atheist slant. I find this point of view interesting, and his honesty refreshing. Even as he draws from the insight of others, his own thoughts and voice are clearly communicated. I felt as if he was saying, “This is how I am and operate in the world, a product of my particular time and circumstances. You probably will not change my mind, but neither will I try to change yours. Let's talk (and argue!)!”

This was, from start to finish, a very enjoyable read.
58 von 68 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
2.0 von 5 Sternen Don't Expect Too Much 7. Juli 2014
Von Thomas A. Jones - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch
Frank Schaeffer is receiving much praise for his book. He touches a nerve felt my many of us. We believe, but we also find streaks of unbelief in our efforts to process reality. We may feel that our faith community is not a safe place to voice those kind of thoughts. Except from some downsides I will mention shortly, this could be the kind of book that would encourage more openness

His paradoxical, if not misleading title, probably will draw many to this work. However, as another reviewer has noted, Schaeffer is no atheist. He seems to have many agnostic moments. He is quite accepting of atheists, saying “more power to them,” but he offers far too many reasons for some kind of faith in some kind of god to be called an unbeliever. There is no danger of Richard Dawkins asking him to take Christopher Hitchens’ place among “The Four Horsemen of the Non-Apocalypse.”

Frank frequently voices his appreciation for Jesus, but his Jesus is one that is disconnected from Jewish history and the first century Jewish context. That leads to a serious problem. For one who expresses support for so many of Jesus' words found in the gospels, he seems to miss the fact that Jesus’ main message was the coming of the Kingdom of God. Consequently Frank’s Jesus puts much emphasis on love and forgiveness, but does not call Frank or us to submit to him as Lord or to put ourselves under the reign or “kingness” of God.

For all his acknowledgments as to how much he does not know, Frank still does not seem to exalt or call for the quality of humility that Jesus said was so essential for the Kingdom life. Jesus spoke with reference of the written words saying, “the Scriptures cannot be broken” (John 10:35). And another place "Do not think that I have come to abolish the Law or the Prophets; I have not come to abolish them but to fulfill them” (Matthew 5:17). Frank looks at the same canon and says “ [It is] one of the most inconsistent and corrosive books ever compiled.” If Jesus is at least a sage worth listening to and one you build your spiritual life around, is it not arrogant to take words Jesus treated with such respect and treat them as worse than trash?

Frank’s Jesus would have us pursue love and beauty as we define it. The concept of obedience, which is so central to Jesus’ message, seems to Frank to belong to the fundamentalism that he so openly ridicules and despises.

With no confidence in the gospels’ authenticity, Frank selects those statements of Jesus he approves of, much in the style of Thomas Jefferson, yet he seems to go further than the founding father with his stunning revulsion for most of Scripture.

Frank’s honesty will endear him to many readers, particularly those who have suffered under hypocritical and self-righteous leaders. He seems to have an authenticity and realness so often missing among the practitioners of religion. He helps us feel more normal as we struggle with faith and doubt, and offers one way we might learn to live with the latter without giving up the former.

However, as real as doubt is and as stubborn as it can be, genuine faith, especially as taught by Jesus, is more possible, robust and transformational than Frank would lead us to believe. With an attractive candor, he has shared with us his mind and heart. What he did not do was give us a reason to want to leave our nets and go with him or follow Jesus. Perhaps he would say that neither of those was his goal.

So, read Frank’s book and learn from him a good deal of intellectual history. Enjoy his insights that come from his grandchildren--those Narnia-like characters, Jack and Lucy. Gain pleasure from a writer who knows well his craft. Relate to someone who struggles just like you do, but articulates it better. Just don’t expect to catch a clearer view of the Jesus who calls you to find your life by losing it for him and his kingdom.
58 von 71 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
1.0 von 5 Sternen What a mess 19. Juni 2014
Von Kerry Walters - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch|Verifizierter Kauf
Some books are self-published because they're such groundbreaking works of genius - Thoreau's Walden, for example - that conventional publishers don't know what to make of them. But other self-published books are such crap that no respectable publisher or editor wants to touch them with a barge pole. Frank Schaeffer's recent Why I am an Atheist Who Believes in God falls into this category.

The book is an extraordinarily bad melange of half-baked thoughts on religion, art, and culture, all of which are sandwiched between autobiographical details that range from the bathetic to the tedious. The central thesis reads like a college sophomore's stab at post-modern-speak: we humans are narrative-making creatures who long for a "one-size-fits-all" framework. But there is no objective truth - "there are no other kinds of arguments than circular ones" (p. 78) - and any "paradigm," be it religious, philosophical, scientific, or whatever, is fictional. "There are no objective facts, just personal histories and the coincidences of time and place seen through the lenses of short lives. Deal with it." (p. 26)

Shaeffer's conclusion is that because all truth is a fiction, because what one believes is ultimately nothing more than arbitrary choice or environmentally programmed script, there's no shame in embracing contradictions. Hence the book's headline-grabbing title.

Look. Of course part of the human condition is learning to live with ambiguity. Even the most deeply-held beliefs are tinged with a certain degree of ambivalence and uncertainty, and we're wise to be wary of one-size-fits-all explanatory reductionism. But Shaeffer's awful little book goes way beyond that common sense observation to reject the very possibility of knowledge and truth for the sake of a bizarre subjectivism. It's not clear to me that he actually wants to do that - after all, accepting his thesis means rejecting his book - but regardless of his intentions, that's the corner he's painted himself into.

In short, Why I am an Atheist Who Believes in God is a lazy book for a lazy culture that wants to believe what it wants to believe, without having to deal with troublesome things like fact, truth, or reason. Sigh.
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