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Where the Wild Things Are (Englisch) Gebundene Ausgabe – Special Edition, 26. Dezember 2012

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Where the Wild Things Are is one of those truly rare books that can be enjoyed equally by a child and a grown-up. If you disagree, then it's been too long since you've attended a wild rumpus. Max dons his wolf suit in pursuit of some mischief and gets sent to bed without supper. Fortuitously, a forest grows in his room, allowing his wild rampage to continue unimpaired. Sendak's colour illustrations (perhaps his finest) are beautiful, and each turn of the page brings the discovery of a new wonder.

The wild things--with their mismatched parts and giant eyes--manage somehow to be scary-looking without ever really being scary; at times they're downright hilarious. Sendak's defiantly run-on sentences--one of his trademarks--lend the perfect touch of stream of consciousness to the tale, which floats between the land of dreams and a child's imagination.

This Sendak classic is more fun than you've ever had in a wolf's suit, giggle-stiflingly funny at times, and even manages to reaffirm the notion that there's no place like home. -- Dieser Text bezieht sich auf eine vergriffene oder nicht verfügbare Ausgabe dieses Titels.

Pressestimmen

"Sendak is the daddy of them all when it comes to picture books - the words, the rhythm and the design are all wonderful." (S Magazine, Sunday Express)

"The key to Sendak's success and to the continuing hipness of his book, is that it's hero is not a good child . . . the book is, in fact, extraordinarily childcentric, a book written for and about terrible infants, the kind of terrible infants that most children really are and that all adults remain for much of the time" (David Baddiel The Times)

"This is my never-fail picture book. The text is very short, but utterly perfect, the illustrations are tremendous" (Jacqueline Wilson)

"Gripping, ingenious and uplifting . . . a shrewd, fierce, healing book" (Boyd Tonkin Independent)

"A timeless masterpiece. The illustrations, the fabulous monsters, the beautiful cross-hatching, and the surreal, dreamlike narrative beckons the reader to join the adventure. The themes are perfect for inspiring discussion on confronting life's scary things, mastering your fears and being brave, letting off steam, saying goodbye, and the comfort of returning home safe and sound" (Child Education) -- Dieser Text bezieht sich auf eine andere Ausgabe: Taschenbuch .

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Einleitungssatz
The night Max wore his wolf suit and made mischief of one kind and another his mother called him "WILD THING!" and Max said "I'LL EAT YOU UP!" so he was sent to bed without eating anything. Lesen Sie die erste Seite
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11 von 11 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von Robert James am 17. Juli 2000
Format: Taschenbuch
Reviewing Maurice Sendak's "Where the Wild Things Are" is a bit like pointing at a full moon on a clear night: it's rather hard to miss. My favorite book as a child first learning to read, "Where the Wild Things Are" has recently moved into the handful of books my 3-year old daughter wants read to her again and again (and again and again). Max's rebelliousness and imagination are like looking into a mirror for her: as Max realizes what awaits him at home, I like to think she too remembers all those times she misbehaved and got angry and then decided her parents were okay after all. The pictures still hold their charm after nearly four decades; their quirkiness hasn't faded. This book belongs in the library of every human on the planet, regardless of age.
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7 von 7 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von Quaker Annie am 14. Juli 2000
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
This book, written in 1963, has been in our family for near to 30 years in its original hardcover edition!
It's been passed down, from my oldest at 32 to my youngest, now 8. Each child had their own reasons for loving it, and my tattered (but still good enough for grandkids) copy carries scribbles and memories from each of my sons.
Max is so mad at his mother one evening, when she puts him in his room, he sails off for a year, venturing out where the wild things are - huge, strange looking creatures with terrible eyes and terrible claws, who dance by the light of the moon.
Max handles them all, shouting "BE STILL" until they are so frightened, they agree he's the most wild thing of all.
He goes home in time to eat the supper (the cause of his anger), which is still warm.
The illustrations, colored sketches by Maurice Sendak, invite the imagination of children who might just like a good tale.
For kids who are beginning to express their anger (from 2 to 5), this book is a safe expression of just how *mad* a child can get, and how they can control those wild feelings!
The words are few, and some pages are filled with nothing but Max and the Wild Things, after "the wild rumpus begins."
If you like this book, get it in hardcover. It will be read so many times, you'll be glad you did!
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3 von 3 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von Brandie Nicole Freed am 17. Juli 2000
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
Young Max is sent to bed without supper. Max drifts off to sleep and finds a way to take care of his hunger.Max visists many wild things through out the story that prove to make children laugh! Activities: Using "Wild Thing" music which you have chosen, have the students recreate the wild rumpus. Follow up, Children can write in their journals about the rumpus.
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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von Ein Kunde am 6. Februar 1997
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
A story on kids in the 90s that appeared recently in the Wall Street Journal compared the top three children's books from two eras: the 1960s and the 1990s. Despite being parent of a three-year-old who loves books, I had never heard of any of those listed as today's favorites, at least not in book form (two were adapted from Disney movies). However, I owned all of the books on the 1960s list, which included, in order of preference, Dr. Suess' classic Green Eggs and Ham, Richard Scarry's Best Word Book Ever and Sendak's Where the Wild Things Are. While not passing judgement on the 1995 rankings, I had to wonder why or when the 1960s choices fell from favor. Where the Wild Things are is a timeless tribute to childhood imagination, a story as meaningful to kids today as it was 30 years ago.

Children simply can't help identifying with Sendak's hero Max, the type of kid who amuses himself by dressing in a wolf suit and chasing his hapless dog with a giant fork. Max's frazzled mother calls him a wild thing and sends him to bed without supper. "Wild thing?" As Max broods over the appelation, his imagination takes over. He soon finds himself on a boat to a strange land where he's named king of a herd of wild things all much larger, hairier, and meaner-looking than he ever pretended to be. The whole experience is fun, sure, who wouldn't like all the attention, all the swinging from trees and royal treatment? Still, the boat awaits, and eventually Max takes it back home, to where his mother (now calm) has thoughtfully kept his supper hot.

I've read some recent children's books that stand up to the classics, but Pocahontas and Lion King don't quite make the grade. If you haven't already, introduce your child to Max. It will seem like they've known each other forever.
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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von Kardewski am 6. Mai 2010
Format: Taschenbuch
Warum ist dieses Buch so gut? Vermutlich müsste man Kind sein, um diese Frage, wenn auch nicht in Worten, beantworten zu können. Herrliche Formen und Farben, ein brillanter Zeichenstil, eine Geschichte so reduziert und simpel, wie sie nur geht... Aber so oft ich es mir auch ansehe, ich komme einfach nicht hinter sein wahres Geheimnis. Macht also am Ende dies genau den Reiz aus? Maurice Sendak hat ein kleines unheimliches zeitloses Werk geschaffen, von einem Rang, dass man es mit Beethoven und anderen auserwählten menschlichen Kulturgütern zusammen ins All schicken sollte, um mögliche Außerirdische zu beeindrucken. Die sich ihr Inneres Kind, hoffentlich, bewahrt haben. Nur, bitte, nicht in Übersetzung, denn man lese nur - mit Staunen - folgenden Satz: "And now let the wild rumpus start!"
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