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Weaving the Web: The Original Design and Ultimate Destiny of the World Wide Web by Its Inventor [Englisch] [Gebundene Ausgabe]

Tim Berners-Lee
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Produktbeschreibungen

Amazon.de

If you can read this review (and voice your opinion about his book on Amazon.com), you have Tim Berners-Lee to thank. When you've read his no-nonsense account of how he invented the World Wide Web, you'll want to thank him again, for the sheer coolness of his ideas. One day in 1980, Berners-Lee, an Oxford-trained computer consultant, got a random thought: "Suppose all the information stored on computers everywhere were linked?" So he created a system to give every "page" on a computer a standard address (now called a URL, or Universal Resource Locator), accessible via the HyperText Transfer Protocol (HTTP), formatted with the HyperText Markup Language (HTML), and visible with the first browser, which did the trick of linking us all up.

He may be the most self-effacing genius of the computer age, and his egalitarian mind is evident in the names he rejected for his invention: "I thought of Mine of Information, or MOI, but moi in French means 'me,' and that was too egocentric.... The Information Mine (TIM) was even more egocentric!" Also, a mine is a passive repository; the Web is something that grows inexorably from everyone's contributions. Berners-Lee fully credits the colorful characters who helped him get the bobsled of progress going--one colleague times his haircuts to match the solstices--but he's stubbornly independent-minded. His quest is to make the Web "a place where the whim of a human being and the reasoning of a machine coexist in an ideal, powerful mixture."

Hard-core tech types may wish Berners-Lee had gone into deeper detail about the road ahead: the "boon and threat" of XML, free vs. commercial software, VRML 3-D imaging, and such. But he wants everyone in on the debate, so he wrote a brisk book that virtually anyone can understand. --Tim Appelo

Synopsis

The World Wide Web's explosion onto the global scene is one of the most dramatic arrivals of technology in history. Consequently, myths and misconceptions about the origins, impact and future of this technology have run wild. Now, for the first time, the world hears from the man who invented the WWW. English computer scientist Tim Berners-Lee quietly laid the groundwork for the WWW (and consequently Hypertext) in 1980, created a prototype in 1990, and unleashed it to the public in 1991. Now the Head of the Worldwide Web Consortium that oversees the WWW's growth, Berners-Lee provides in this book the inside truth about where the WWW came from and the remarkable discoveries that made it the platform to today's communications revolution. He also offers an important analysis of the future development of the WWW, and the likely impact on business and society. Berners-Lee was recently described in The Observer as the man 'who invented the future, who created something which one day will be bigger than all the other industries on earth'. -- Dieser Text bezieht sich auf eine vergriffene oder nicht verfügbare Ausgabe dieses Titels.

Über den Autor und weitere Mitwirkende

Tim Berners-Lee, inventor of the Web, is currently the director of theWorld Wide Web Consortium, the coordinating body for Web development, and heoccupies the 3Com Founders chair at the MIT Laboratory for Computer Science.Recipient of numerous awards, he received the distinguished MacArthurFellowship in 1998. He lives in Cambridge, MA.
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