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Waiting for the Sun: A Rock & Roll History of Los Angeles
Format: TaschenbuchÄndern
Preis:19,57 €+Kostenfreie Lieferung mit Amazon Prime

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am 7. Januar 1999
I loved this book, and you might love it also if you can manage to step over its many steaming diatribes against what Barney Hoskyns considers to be racism based on corrupt capitalism.
For example, the Beach Boys' early emphasis on surfing, sun, and fun on the beach is, to Hoskyns, somehow an Aryan fantasy nearly worthy of Adolf Hitler. For Hoskyns there's apparently a racist in almost every woodpile, and most of the woodpiles are owned by evil capitalists.
But the book happens to be a really good, richly detailed history of popular music in LA, well worth reading. The many photographs are terrific. It was amazing to read the descriptions of the very hot jazz scene in south central LA in the 30s and 40s, and I was fascinated by how surf music gave way to the mid-60s hippie scene, and how that scene became poisoned with drugs and many other things, including none other than Charles Manson. There's a wealth of juicy quotes from all kinds of people.
Hoskyns is a very good writer, is very witty and acerbic in his observations, and his apparent familiarity with the music and the people are exceptional.
Plus, the book is very well-edited. I don't recall a single typo, although it's full of goofy British spellings and expressions, things like calling a beeper a "bleeper." But it adds to the book's charm.
Hoskyns obviously worked hard and long on this, and it's really enjoyable.
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am 11. Oktober 2009
Both this book and its successor "Hotel California" provide a very thorough, well-researched but readable explanation of the role that Los Angeles and California played in the development of rock music. Barney Hoskins' story is musically fascinating but it also lifts the lid on a social scene which encompassed a range of characters. Here we learn about the musical heroes, the charlatans and the hangers-on whose activities not only contributed so much to the growth of music in the city but almost killed it in an orgy of excess. The death of Sharon Tate at the hands of followers of Charles Manson proved to be the lowest point among a series of bad moments.

However, Barney Hoskins knows his subject and is very good at explaining the myriad strands which made up the ever-changing developments from 50s pop through 70s rock to 80s rap and beyond. He doesn't ignore the scene outside of LA either. San Francisco artists are featured quite often, especially in relation to the Hippy scene but I was surprised to find no mention of the band "Tower of Power" whose brass-based soul sound was featured on so many major albums by other Californian artists. TOP are still going strong 40 years later - definitely worth a mention even as a footnote.
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0 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich.
am 28. Dezember 1998
I loved this book, and you might love it also if you can manage to step over its many steaming diatribes against what Barney Hoskyns considers to be racism based on corrupt capitalism.
For example, the Beach Boys' early emphasis on surfing, sun, and fun on the beach is, to Hoskyns, somehow an Aryan fantasy nearly worthy of Adolf Hitler. For Hoskyns there's apparently a racist in almost every woodpile, and most of the woodpiles are owned by evil capitalists.
But the book happens to be a really good, richly detailed history of popular music in LA, well worth reading. The many photographs are terrific. It was amazing to read the descriptions of the very hot jazz scene in south central LA in the 30s and 40s, and I was fascinated at how surf music gave way to the mid-60s hippie scene, and how that scene became poisoned with drugs and many other things, including none other than Charles Manson. There's a wealth of juicy quotes from all kinds of people.
Hoskyns is a very good writer, is very witty and acerbic in his observations, and his apparent familiarity with the music and the people are exceptional.
Plus, the book is very well-edited. I don't recall a single typo, although it's full of goofy British spellings and expressions, things like calling a beeper a "bleeper." But it adds to the book's charm.
Hoskyns obviously worked hard and long on this, and it's really enjoyable.
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