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Waiting for the Sun: A Rock & Roll History of Los Angeles (Englisch) Taschenbuch – 15. März 2009


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Produktinformation

  • Taschenbuch: 420 Seiten
  • Verlag: Backbeat Books; Auflage: Revised. (15. März 2009)
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ISBN-10: 0879309431
  • ISBN-13: 978-0879309435
  • Größe und/oder Gewicht: 12,7 x 2,7 x 19,7 cm
  • Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung: 4.3 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (3 Kundenrezensionen)
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: Nr. 298.215 in Fremdsprachige Bücher (Siehe Top 100 in Fremdsprachige Bücher)
  • Komplettes Inhaltsverzeichnis ansehen

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Produktbeschreibungen

Amazon.de

British rock historian Barney Hoskyns, author of Across the Great Divide: The Band and America, examines the long and twisted rock and roll history of Los Angeles. The Beach Boys, Buffalo Springfield, The Doors, Little Feat, The Eagles, Steely Dan, Linda Ronstadt, Joni Mitchell and others (right up to Black Flag, The Minutemen and Guns N'Roses) populate the pages of this comprehensive and extensively illustrated book. -- Dieser Text bezieht sich auf eine vergriffene oder nicht verfügbare Ausgabe dieses Titels.

Pressestimmen

'A hilarious, chilling, thoroughly scabrous history of post-war pop music in Los Angeles... fascinating' Los Angeles Times Book Review 'Beautifully written' Melody Maker 'Fabulously authoritative and grimly compelling' Sunday Times 'Magnificent... His enthusiasm for the subject is not only tangible but infectious, and will have you rifling through forgotten areas of your record collection with renewed passion' VOX 'A terrific, sprawling, hugely ambitious study of the city's rock 'n' roll history... Hoskyns skilfully straddles his role as detached historian and gushing enthusiast in this tremendous book' NME -- Dieser Text bezieht sich auf eine vergriffene oder nicht verfügbare Ausgabe dieses Titels.

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Von Ein Kunde am 7. Januar 1999
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
I loved this book, and you might love it also if you can manage to step over its many steaming diatribes against what Barney Hoskyns considers to be racism based on corrupt capitalism.
For example, the Beach Boys' early emphasis on surfing, sun, and fun on the beach is, to Hoskyns, somehow an Aryan fantasy nearly worthy of Adolf Hitler. For Hoskyns there's apparently a racist in almost every woodpile, and most of the woodpiles are owned by evil capitalists.
But the book happens to be a really good, richly detailed history of popular music in LA, well worth reading. The many photographs are terrific. It was amazing to read the descriptions of the very hot jazz scene in south central LA in the 30s and 40s, and I was fascinated by how surf music gave way to the mid-60s hippie scene, and how that scene became poisoned with drugs and many other things, including none other than Charles Manson. There's a wealth of juicy quotes from all kinds of people.
Hoskyns is a very good writer, is very witty and acerbic in his observations, and his apparent familiarity with the music and the people are exceptional.
Plus, the book is very well-edited. I don't recall a single typo, although it's full of goofy British spellings and expressions, things like calling a beeper a "bleeper." But it adds to the book's charm.
Hoskyns obviously worked hard and long on this, and it's really enjoyable.
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Von Ein Kunde am 28. Dezember 1998
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
I loved this book, and you might love it also if you can manage to step over its many steaming diatribes against what Barney Hoskyns considers to be racism based on corrupt capitalism.
For example, the Beach Boys' early emphasis on surfing, sun, and fun on the beach is, to Hoskyns, somehow an Aryan fantasy nearly worthy of Adolf Hitler. For Hoskyns there's apparently a racist in almost every woodpile, and most of the woodpiles are owned by evil capitalists.
But the book happens to be a really good, richly detailed history of popular music in LA, well worth reading. The many photographs are terrific. It was amazing to read the descriptions of the very hot jazz scene in south central LA in the 30s and 40s, and I was fascinated at how surf music gave way to the mid-60s hippie scene, and how that scene became poisoned with drugs and many other things, including none other than Charles Manson. There's a wealth of juicy quotes from all kinds of people.
Hoskyns is a very good writer, is very witty and acerbic in his observations, and his apparent familiarity with the music and the people are exceptional.
Plus, the book is very well-edited. I don't recall a single typo, although it's full of goofy British spellings and expressions, things like calling a beeper a "bleeper." But it adds to the book's charm.
Hoskyns obviously worked hard and long on this, and it's really enjoyable.
Kommentar War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein Feedback senden...
Vielen Dank für Ihr Feedback. Wenn diese Rezension unangemessen ist, informieren Sie uns bitte darüber.
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Format: Taschenbuch Verifizierter Kauf
Both this book and its successor "Hotel California" provide a very thorough, well-researched but readable explanation of the role that Los Angeles and California played in the development of rock music. Barney Hoskins' story is musically fascinating but it also lifts the lid on a social scene which encompassed a range of characters. Here we learn about the musical heroes, the charlatans and the hangers-on whose activities not only contributed so much to the growth of music in the city but almost killed it in an orgy of excess. The death of Sharon Tate at the hands of followers of Charles Manson proved to be the lowest point among a series of bad moments.

However, Barney Hoskins knows his subject and is very good at explaining the myriad strands which made up the ever-changing developments from 50s pop through 70s rock to 80s rap and beyond. He doesn't ignore the scene outside of LA either. San Francisco artists are featured quite often, especially in relation to the Hippy scene but I was surprised to find no mention of the band "Tower of Power" whose brass-based soul sound was featured on so many major albums by other Californian artists. TOP are still going strong 40 years later - definitely worth a mention even as a footnote.
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Amazon.com: 17 Rezensionen
29 von 29 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
An excellent overview of 50 years of LA music 26. Dezember 2000
Von Ein Kunde - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch
Barney Hoskyns' "Waiting for the Sun" is a superbly written and illustrated history of the Los Angeles music scene from the Second World War through the early nineties. There aren't many really good books about popular music around, but this is one of them; in fact, I'd say it's the best book yet written about a music "scene" (as opposed to a particular artist), even better than Jon Savage's "England's Dreaming," which recounts the explosion of punk in the U.K. in the 1970's.
The story moves effortlessly through the progression of musical styles that have flourished and often cross-pollinated each other in Southern California -- small-combo jazz, R&B, early rock & roll, surf music, folk-rock, psychedelia, country rock, heavy metal, punk and rap. The book includes lively portraits of the many famous (and infamous) people who have been a part of it, like Phil Spector, Ricky Nelson, Sam Cooke, David Crosby, Neil Young, Sonny Bono, the Beach Boys, Jim Morrison, Gram Parsons, Charles Manson, Randy Newman, Steely Dan, X and NWA, but also discusses many talented people who never quite made it to the big time, or who lost their way before realizing their full potential. Hoskyns is quite good in describing the business side of the music scene, and in relating events outside the music scene (for example, the booming aerospace industry, the surfing craze, the development of a "San Francisco sound," and the riots of 1965 and 1992) that had a significant impact on it.
In tracing the development of popular music in LA, Hoskyns makes the key point -- though this is hardly news -- that no musical style remains popular very long, and even the most creative and versatile artists simply can't stay on top for more than a couple of years. A handful of artists (Neil Young and Joni Mitchell come to mind) do manage to hold onto a significant audience throughout their careers, but few artists have their level of talent and dedication, and seem to do better by going into production, or management, or the movies, or politics (like Sonny Bono), than trying to rely on an outmoded musical formula.
Another key point is that during the sixties, Los Angeles became the popular music capital of the U.S., if not the world. Los Angeles' preeminence in the industry may be a given now, but even as late as the mid-sixties, many of the top groups lived and worked in New York, Detroit, New Orleans, and elsewhere; as Hoskyns documents, a lively club scene, big-name entertainment companies, sun and palm trees, and growing ranks of like-minded artists, all combined to make the region the entertainment mecca it is today.
This book contains a few small errors, such as repeatedly referring to "Huntingdon" rather than "Huntington" Beach, and ascribing several different publication years to Mike Davis' "City of Quartz," another fine book about Southern California. I also don't understand the significance of the book's lame title, except that it was also the title of the Doors' generally lame third album. Finally, I take issue with Hoskyns' gratuitous bashing of Joan Didion, whose writings on California in the sixties are still -- at least to this Midwesterner -- better than anyone else's.
These minor complaints aside, "Waiting for the Sun" is a superb book, a great addition to the literature on both popular music and Southern California.
11 von 11 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
I wanted to like it but... 11. Februar 2012
Von tank03 - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch Verifizierter Kauf
I really wanted to like this book but it never really met my expectations. The book is more a history of the music business rather than a history of the music. Lots of material on corporate executives and A&R men; not that such material isn't necessary or important, but I was expecting more information regarding the artists and their work. More about the musical culture involving the artists would have been appreciated, instead of the inner working of the various record companies and their employees.

Hoskyns also imbues the narrative with his own personal biases in regards to the quality of the music and/or artists. He does this to the point of annoyance and actually comes off sounding fairly pretentious and even a bit childish. I would have preferred a more objective and even-handed journlaistic approach, allowing me to make my own judgements.

I also have to agree with another reviewer that Hoskyns seems intent on finding racism around every corner and under every rock in LA. Much like his comments regarding the quality of the music, these rants soon start to annoy and detract from the overall narrative.

As I said, I really wanted to like this book but ended up disappointed.
14 von 15 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Great book despite fetish politics 7. Januar 1999
Von Ein Kunde - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
I loved this book, and you might love it also if you can manage to step over its many steaming diatribes against what Barney Hoskyns considers to be racism based on corrupt capitalism.
For example, the Beach Boys' early emphasis on surfing, sun, and fun on the beach is, to Hoskyns, somehow an Aryan fantasy nearly worthy of Adolf Hitler. For Hoskyns there's apparently a racist in almost every woodpile, and most of the woodpiles are owned by evil capitalists.
But the book happens to be a really good, richly detailed history of popular music in LA, well worth reading. The many photographs are terrific. It was amazing to read the descriptions of the very hot jazz scene in south central LA in the 30s and 40s, and I was fascinated by how surf music gave way to the mid-60s hippie scene, and how that scene became poisoned with drugs and many other things, including none other than Charles Manson. There's a wealth of juicy quotes from all kinds of people.
Hoskyns is a very good writer, is very witty and acerbic in his observations, and his apparent familiarity with the music and the people are exceptional.
Plus, the book is very well-edited. I don't recall a single typo, although it's full of goofy British spellings and expressions, things like calling a beeper a "bleeper." But it adds to the book's charm.
Hoskyns obviously worked hard and long on this, and it's really enjoyable.
11 von 12 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Fascinating, exhaustive critical history of L.A. music scene 3. September 1998
Von Ein Kunde - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
"Waiting for the Sun" is an intelligent, informative, and very entertaining critical history of the Los Angeles pop music scene from the late 1940s through the 1990s. Real-life characters as diverse as Jim Morrison, Brian Wilson, Neil Young, Henry Rollins, Sly Stone, Kim Fowley, John Phillips, Ice Cube, Phil Spector, Axl Rose, Lou Adler, Charles Manson, Rick Nelson, and James Ellroy (and others too numerous to mention) are discussed and examined, painting a nightmarish portrait of Los Angeles as a city of dreams and decadence. Highly recommended for pop music fans, cultural historians, and those fascinated with the noir-ish allure of the City of Angels.
3 von 3 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
A great book despite fetish politics 28. Dezember 1998
Von Ein Kunde - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
I loved this book, and you might love it also if you can manage to step over its many steaming diatribes against what Barney Hoskyns considers to be racism based on corrupt capitalism.
For example, the Beach Boys' early emphasis on surfing, sun, and fun on the beach is, to Hoskyns, somehow an Aryan fantasy nearly worthy of Adolf Hitler. For Hoskyns there's apparently a racist in almost every woodpile, and most of the woodpiles are owned by evil capitalists.
But the book happens to be a really good, richly detailed history of popular music in LA, well worth reading. The many photographs are terrific. It was amazing to read the descriptions of the very hot jazz scene in south central LA in the 30s and 40s, and I was fascinated at how surf music gave way to the mid-60s hippie scene, and how that scene became poisoned with drugs and many other things, including none other than Charles Manson. There's a wealth of juicy quotes from all kinds of people.
Hoskyns is a very good writer, is very witty and acerbic in his observations, and his apparent familiarity with the music and the people are exceptional.
Plus, the book is very well-edited. I don't recall a single typo, although it's full of goofy British spellings and expressions, things like calling a beeper a "bleeper." But it adds to the book's charm.
Hoskyns obviously worked hard and long on this, and it's really enjoyable.
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