Vagabonding und über 1,5 Millionen weitere Bücher verfügbar für Amazon Kindle. Erfahren Sie mehr
EUR 10,90
  • Alle Preisangaben inkl. MwSt.
Gewöhnlich versandfertig in 3 bis 5 Wochen.
Verkauf und Versand durch Amazon.
Geschenkverpackung verfügbar.
Menge:1
Ihren Artikel jetzt
eintauschen und
EUR 4,25 Gutschein erhalten.
Möchten Sie verkaufen?
Zur Rückseite klappen Zur Vorderseite klappen
Anhören Wird wiedergegeben... Angehalten   Sie hören eine Probe der Audible-Audioausgabe.
Weitere Informationen
Alle 2 Bilder anzeigen

Vagabonding: An Uncommon Guide to the Art of Long-Term World Travel (Englisch) Taschenbuch – 24. Dezember 2002


Alle 2 Formate und Ausgaben anzeigen Andere Formate und Ausgaben ausblenden
Amazon-Preis Neu ab Gebraucht ab
Kindle Edition
"Bitte wiederholen"
Taschenbuch
"Bitte wiederholen"
EUR 10,90
EUR 6,70 EUR 19,81
18 neu ab EUR 6,70 4 gebraucht ab EUR 19,81

Wird oft zusammen gekauft

Vagabonding: An Uncommon Guide to the Art of Long-Term World Travel + The Art of Learning: An Inner Journey to Optimal Performance + Daily Rituals: How Artists Work
Preis für alle drei: EUR 41,01

Einige dieser Artikel sind schneller versandfertig als andere.

Die ausgewählten Artikel zusammen kaufen
Jeder kann Kindle Bücher lesen — selbst ohne ein Kindle-Gerät — mit der KOSTENFREIEN Kindle App für Smartphones, Tablets und Computer.


Geschenk in letzter Sekunde?
Amazon.de Geschenkgutscheine zu Weihnachten: Zum Ausdrucken | Per E-Mail

Produktinformation

  • Taschenbuch: 224 Seiten
  • Verlag: Villard; Auflage: 1 (24. Dezember 2002)
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ISBN-10: 0812992180
  • ISBN-13: 978-0812992182
  • Größe und/oder Gewicht: 13,2 x 1,2 x 20,3 cm
  • Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung: 4.0 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (4 Kundenrezensionen)
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: Nr. 4.036 in Fremdsprachige Bücher (Siehe Top 100 in Fremdsprachige Bücher)

Mehr über den Autor

Entdecken Sie Bücher, lesen Sie über Autoren und mehr

Produktbeschreibungen

Über den Autor und weitere Mitwirkende

Rolf Potts funded his earliest vagabonding experiences by working as a landscaper and an ESL teacher. He now writes about independent travel for National Geographic Adventure, and his travel essays have appeared in Salon, Condé Nast Traveler, National Geographic Traveler, and Best American Travel Writing 2000, and on National Public Radio.

Leseprobe. Abdruck erfolgt mit freundlicher Genehmigung der Rechteinhaber. Alle Rechte vorbehalten.

Chapter 1

From this hour I ordain myself loos'd of limits and imaginary lines, Going where I list, my own master total and absolute, Listening to others, considering well what they say, Pausing, searching, receiving, contemplating, Gently, but with undeniable will divesting myself of the holds that would hold me.

-Walt Whitman, "Song of the Open Road"

Declare Your Independence

Of all the outrageous throwaway lines one hears in movies, there is one that stands out for me. It doesn't come from a madcap comedy, an esoteric science-fiction flick, or a special-effects-laden action thriller. It comes from Oliver Stone's Wall Street, when the Charlie Sheen character - a promising big shot in the stock market - is telling his girlfriend about his dreams.

"I think if I can make a bundle of cash before I'm thirty and get out of this racket," he says, "I'll be able to ride my motorcycle across China."

When I first saw this scene on video a few years ago, I nearly fell out of my seat in astonishment. After all, Charlie Sheen or anyone else could work for eight months as a toilet cleaner and have enough money to ride a motorcycle across China. Even if they didn't yet have their own motorcycle, another couple months of scrubbing toilets would earn them enough to buy one when they got to China.

The thing is, most Americans probably wouldn't find this movie scene odd. For some reason, we see long-term travel to faraway lands as a recurring dream or an exotic temptation, but not something that applies to the here and now. Instead?out of our insane duty to fear, fashion, and monthly payments on things we don't really need - we quarantine our travels to short, frenzied bursts. In this way, as we throw our wealth at an abstract notion called "lifestyle," travel becomes just another accessory -a smooth-edged, encapsulated experience that we purchase the same way we buy clothing and furniture.

Not long ago, I read that nearly a quarter of a million short-term monastery- and convent-based vacations had been booked and sold by tour agents in the year 2000. Spiritual enclaves from Greece to Tibet were turning into hot tourist draws, and travel pundits attributed this "solace boom" to the fact that "busy overachievers are seeking a simpler life."

What nobody bothered to point out, of course, is that purchasing a package vacation to find a simpler life is kind of like using a mirror to see what you look like when you aren't looking into the mirror. All that is really sold is the romantic notion of a simpler life, and - just as no amount of turning your head or flicking your eyes will allow you to unselfconsciously see yourself in the looking glass - no combination of one-week or ten-day vacations will truly take you away from the life you lead at home.

Ultimately, this shotgun wedding of time and money has a way of keeping us in a holding pattern. The more we associate experience with cash value, the more we think that money is what we need to live. And the more we associate money with life, the more we convince ourselves that we're too poor to buy our freedom. With this kind of mind-set, it's no wonder so many Americans think extended overseas travel is the exclusive realm of students, counterculture dropouts, and the idle rich.

In reality, long-term travel has nothing to do with demographics - age, ideology, income - and everything to do with personal outlook. Long-term travel isn't about being a college student; it's about being a student of daily life. Long-term travel isn't an act of rebellion against society; it's an act of common sense within society. Long-term travel doesn't require a massive "bundle of cash"; it requires only that we walk through the world in a more deliberate way.

This deliberate way of walking through the world has always been intrinsic to the time-honored, quietly available travel tradition known as "vagabonding."

Vagabonding involves taking an extended time-out from your normal life?six weeks, four months, two years?to travel the world on your own terms.

But beyond travel, vagabonding is an outlook on life. Vagabonding is about using the prosperity and possibility of the information age to increase your personal options instead of your personal possessions. Vagabonding is about looking for adventure in normal life, and normal life within adventure. Vagabonding is an attitude?a friendly interest in people, places, and things that makes a person an explorer in the truest, most vivid sense of the word.

Vagabonding is not a lifestyle, nor is it a trend. It's just an uncommon way of looking at life - a value adjustment from which action naturally follows. And, as much as anything, vagabonding is about time - our only real commodity - and how we choose to use it.

Sierra Club founder John Muir (an ur-vagabonder if there ever was one) used to express amazement at the well-heeled travelers who would visit Yosemite only to rush away after a few hours of sightseeing. Muir called these folks the "time-poor" - people who were so obsessed with tending their material wealth and social standing that they couldn't spare the time to truly experience the splendor of California's Sierra wilderness. One of Muir's Yosemite visitors in the summer of 1871 was Ralph Waldo Emerson, who gushed upon seeing the sequoias, "It's a wonder that we can see these trees and not wonder more." When Emerson scurried off a couple hours later, however, Muir speculated wryly about whether the famous transcendentalist had really seen the trees in the first place.

Nearly a century later, naturalist Edwin Way Teale used Muir's example to lament the frenetic pace of modern society. "Freedom as John Muir knew it," he wrote in his 1956 book Autumn Across America, "with its wealth of time, its unregimented days, its latitude of choice . . . such freedom seems more rare, more difficult to attain, more remote with each new generation."

But Teale's lament for the deterioration of personal freedom was just as hollow a generalization in 1956 as it is now. As John Muir was well aware, vagabonding has never been regulated by the fickle public definition of lifestyle. Rather, it has always been a private choice within a society that is constantly urging us to do otherwise.

This is a book about living that choice.

Welche anderen Artikel kaufen Kunden, nachdem sie diesen Artikel angesehen haben?


In diesem Buch (Mehr dazu)
Ausgewählte Seiten ansehen
Buchdeckel | Copyright | Inhaltsverzeichnis | Auszug
Hier reinlesen und suchen:

Kundenrezensionen

4.0 von 5 Sternen
5 Sterne
2
4 Sterne
0
3 Sterne
2
2 Sterne
0
1 Sterne
0
Alle 4 Kundenrezensionen anzeigen
Sagen Sie Ihre Meinung zu diesem Artikel

Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen

16 von 16 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von Carsten Jost am 1. Juni 2010
Format: Taschenbuch
Ich konnte es kaum fassen, dass es zu diesem Buch noch
keine Rezension gab!

Rolf Potts ist im englischsprachigen Raum einer der Vordenker,
wenn es um Weltenbummlerei geht. Also genau das, was heute viele
Abiturienten und Studenten in Ihrer Freizeit machen.

Round-the-world-Ticket und für 3-6 Monate um den Globus.

Für solche Touren bereitet das Buch den Leser vor. Und zwar nicht
in Punkto Organisaon und Logistik, sondern viel mehr in punto
Lebenstil und wie man das beste aus so einem Trip rausholt.

Absolut lesenswert
Kommentar War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein Feedback senden...
Vielen Dank für Ihr Feedback. Wenn diese Rezension unangemessen ist, informieren Sie uns bitte darüber.
Wir konnten Ihre Stimmabgabe leider nicht speichern. Bitte erneut versuchen
1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von Brouhaha am 28. Februar 2014
Format: Taschenbuch Verifizierter Kauf
toll geschrieben aber ich verstehe nicht warum dass das beste buch seiner art sein soll. man kann inspiration auch in anderen werken finden. gut, weil kurzweilig. aber nicht sensationell gut.
Kommentar War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein Feedback senden...
Vielen Dank für Ihr Feedback. Wenn diese Rezension unangemessen ist, informieren Sie uns bitte darüber.
Wir konnten Ihre Stimmabgabe leider nicht speichern. Bitte erneut versuchen
3 von 4 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von Birgit am 21. Oktober 2013
Format: Taschenbuch Verifizierter Kauf
Ich habe den Tipp für dieses Buch in irgendeinem Internetforum gefunden und gedacht, die 10 EUR riskier ich.

Ich bin seit langer Zeit am hin und herüberlegen, ob ich mich nicht trauen soll ein Jährchen zu "vagabonden". Noch hat mich das Buch nicht ganz soweit, dass ich das wirklich durchzieh - aber das liegt eher an mir und meiner Feigheit als an dem Inhalt. Es ist sehr flüssig geschrieben - wirklich toll zu lesen. Und es beinhaltet viele praktische Tipps zur Vorbereitung auf die Reise und für unterwegs. Vor allem aber bietet es einen Perspektivenwechsel.

Die Quintessenz lässt sich eigentlich recht knapp zusammenfassen: Nicht zuviel drüber nachdenken, einfach tun. Und das in so ziemlich jeder Hinsicht - von Job kündigen bis hin zum Rucksack packen. Dennoch ist es ermutigend, wenn man das nochmal ein bißchen umfassender formuliert und mit guten "Trau dich"-Argumenten liest.

eine gute Möglichkeit für alle, die mit sich hadern ob sie sich wirklich eine Vagabonding-Auszeit gönnen/zutrauen sollen bzw. eigentlich auch ein guter Begleiter bei der Suche nach der Antwort auf die Frage ob man das wirklich will.

Berücksichtigt bitte: die Bewertung ist wie gesagt aus der Sicht von jemanden, der noch keine Weltenbummler-Erfahrung hat.
Kommentar War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein Feedback senden...
Vielen Dank für Ihr Feedback. Wenn diese Rezension unangemessen ist, informieren Sie uns bitte darüber.
Wir konnten Ihre Stimmabgabe leider nicht speichern. Bitte erneut versuchen
1 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von Jason Haines am 29. Dezember 2013
Format: Taschenbuch Verifizierter Kauf
Vagabonding is a how-to guide on the practical and philosophical elements of long-term travel.

As a experienced independent traveller, I didn't find a lot that was new to me. I felt that much of the contents I could have written myself. What Potts does provide is a lovely writing style (also see his old salon.com column), a keen insight, some good thoughts on the philosophy of travel and a solid set of materials and references.

A good book for someone tempted by the idea of long-term independent travel, but needing a push to take the plunge.
Kommentar War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein Feedback senden...
Vielen Dank für Ihr Feedback. Wenn diese Rezension unangemessen ist, informieren Sie uns bitte darüber.
Wir konnten Ihre Stimmabgabe leider nicht speichern. Bitte erneut versuchen

Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen auf Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 230 Rezensionen
165 von 169 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
great little travel philosophy book 14. Juli 2003
Von Shannon B Davis - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch
Rolf Potts' tome of vagabonding is an inspirational work rather than a practical guide. While the same practical information is contained in other books, this book shines in the area of travel philosophy. Travel is like a religion, where some people are incredibly fervent about it, while others just don't understand. This book makes you realize that long-term travel is not only possible, but desirable and worthwhile.
I particularly liked the section on working for travel. As a 9-to-5 worker planning a long-term trip, I needed the inspiration to keep going. I liked being told that working will actually make me appreciate travel more. After all, to afford travel, I have to be here anyway.
Throughout the book, there are great little excerpts from famous travellers, philosophers, and explorers, as well as anecdotes from ordinary travellers. Rolf has a particular liking for Walt Whitman, and I may just have to go pick up some Walt poetry now. The literary references in this book let you know that world travel and a simple life aren't new concepts.
The only problem I see with this book is that it may soon become dated with its references to specific websites.
The book is of a small and convenient size to take on the road.
94 von 96 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Inspiring 23. Juni 2003
Von Heather Lowe - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch Verifizierter Kauf
The hardest part of world travel is acquiring the mindset that nothing else matters as much as the journey. Getting to a place where you reduce your consumption of unnecessary stuff, commit your time, and leave your daily routine behind takes a fair amount of work, and it also takes a major shift in priorities. Vagabonding serves as the kick-start that gets you to that mental place --the "I can do it, and I can do it soon" reply to the siren call of world travel.
This book is inspiring, clear, and helpful. I'd recommend it to anyone who wants to roam, but thinks they don't have enough money or time. I also recommend it for those, like me, who have gone vagabonding before, know what it takes, and just need a nudge of renewal in order to get back out there again. Great book!
128 von 144 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Insightful, But Occasionally Elitist, Book of Travel Philosophy 19. September 2005
Von Chris Luallen - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch
Potential buyers should first be aware this is really a book of philosophical musings by Potts and his favorite writers, though at least he has good taste in literature with his numerous quotations from Whitman and Thoreau. But those looking for "nuts and bolts" information on how to prepare for a RTW trip or other long term international travel should buy Rough Guide's "First Time Around the World" instead.

As an avid traveller, I do agree with much of what Potts has to say, especially about getting off the tourist track and experiencing other cultures more fully and realistically. But I also believe that Potts' writing, while very passionate, is often marred by a lack of humility. His intention is to "inspire" people to travel - a worthwhile aim. But his constant insistence that every person should immediately start saving money then quit their job and hit the road often comes off as overbearing and "know it all", without any sense of understanding for other people's situations or priorities - such as work and children.

Personally, I begin "vagabonding" through the United States, Asia and Latin America at 18. Now, at the ripe old age of 37, I still manage to travel every year, also my wife is from Ecuador so we go there quite often. But my career obligations make my trips shorter than they used to be. Hopefully Potts will gain some maturity over time and begin to recognize that his way isn't the only way. Otherwise the guy is a pretty good writer with an intense passion for travel and some intelligent things to say about it. Just remember this is a book of philosophy and opinions rather than useful factual info. So those looking for a guide to travel planning should look elsewhere.
30 von 31 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
this book is akin to torture 22. Oktober 2005
Von Shawn Mansell - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch
If you have even the slightest desire to drop all responsability and run around globetrotting this piece will only encourage you.

And if you don't have the means to do so this book will torture you with temptation.

Potts doesn't offer lots of cost-saving tips, he instead shares his philosophy of working your life to fit international travel.

If you are struck with wanderlust after reading this book- remember you were warned
45 von 50 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Philosophy Class Meets the Road 18. September 2003
Von Tim Leffel - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch
This book is essentially about the thought process behind taking time off from your regular life to discover and experience the world on your own terms. If you've been around the world a few times, you'll find it puts many of your fuzzy warm thoughts and ideals into words. If you haven't, it'll probably make you wonder why you haven't taken off already.
People who like to plan and be prepared should treat this as a companion to more nuts-and-bolts guides. Others may find this plenty since travel is all an adventure anyway. It depends on your personality and comfort with the unknown. The rarely expressed aspect of Potts' book, however, is the acknowledgement that both work and travel are admirable and that one complements the other. To travel, you must also be productive sometimes. But to be productive, you also have to continually learn and see other points of view. Traveling abroad on more than a one-week vacation makes this possible. An entertaining and inspiring read.
Tim Leffel, author of THE WORLD'S CHEAPEST DESTINATIONS
Waren diese Rezensionen hilfreich? Wir wollen von Ihnen hören.