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Unruly Places: Lost Spaces, Secret Cities, and Other Inscrutable Geographies [Englisch] [Gebundene Ausgabe]

Alastair Bonnett

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Kurzbeschreibung

8. Juli 2014
A tour of the world’s hidden geographies—from disappearing islands to forbidden deserts—and a stunning testament to how mysterious the world remains today

At a time when Google Maps Street View can take you on a virtual tour of Yosemite’s remotest trails and cell phones double as navigational systems, it’s hard to imagine there’s any uncharted ground left on the planet. In Unruly Places, Alastair Bonnett goes to some of the most unexpected, offbeat places in the world to reinspire our geographical imagination.

Bonnett’s remarkable tour includes moving villages, secret cities, no man’s lands, and floating islands. He explores places as disorienting as Sandy Island, an island included on maps until just two years ago despite the fact that it never existed. Or Sealand, an abandoned gun platform off the English coast that a British citizen claimed as his own sovereign nation, issuing passports and crowning his wife as a princess. Or Baarle, a patchwork of Dutch and Flemish enclaves where walking from the grocery store’s produce section to the meat counter can involve crossing national borders.

An intrepid guide down the road much-less traveled, Bonnett reveals that the most extraordinary places on earth might be hidden in plain sight, just around the corner from your apartment or underfoot on a wooded path. Perfect for urban explorers, wilderness ramblers, and armchair travelers struck by wanderlust, Unruly Places will change the way you see the places you inhabit.


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Pressestimmen

"Delightfully quirky." —Ron Charles, Washington Post

"Fascinating...A conversational, thoroughly researched, and very engaging armchair tour of what might be seen as a parallel planet to the one we live in every day—one in which nothing is ordinary...Alastair Bonnett is a most excellent traveling companion." —The Atlantic

"Unruly [Places] overflows with amazing examples of the world's hidden places." —Entertainment Weekly

"A chronicle of the world’s missing and hidden treasures...Bonnett manages to imbue the mundane—a traffic island in Newcastle, England—with the same gravitas given to the politically and historically weighty—an empty decoy city in North Korea meant to lure defectors from its southern neighbor." —The Daily Beast

"[Bonnett] takes us to one-of-a-kind, off-the-grid areas—from Cappadocia to Camp Zeist to Chitmahais—in this inspired, instructive travelogue on earth's lost spaces, breakaway nations, no-man's-lands, floating islands, and secret enclaves." —Elle

"An ideal travel tome."  —Pauline Frommer, Frommers.com

"Fizzingly entertaining and enlightening." —The Telegraph

“A fascinating delve into uncharted, forgotten, and lost places. . . . not just a trivia-tastic anthology of remote destinations but a nifty piece of psychogeography, explaining our human need for these cartographical conundrums." —Wanderlust 

“Unruly Places works to re-enchant the world by introducing us to unlikely places: places that exist but cannot be found on any map, places on maps that do not exist, islands that disappear or suddenly appear, deserts that form out of lakes, and labyrinths beneath cities. Carefully avoiding nostalgia and rose-tinted topophilia, Bonnett manages to reveal a myriad of ways in which place and geography still matter.” —Tim Cresswell, author of Place, An Introduction and professor of history and international affairs, Northeastern University

“Through dozens of punchy tales, Bonnett takes us on an imaginative grand tour of the most exceptional places in the world, reminding us that even in an age of seemingly total surveillance, the world is teeming with geographic mysteries.” —Bradley Garrett, author of Explore Everything

"Bonnett’s charming, pensive prose and light-handed erudition illuminates the stubborn human impulse to find a home in the unlikeliest places." —Publishers Weekly

"A wonderful collection of a few dozen geographical enchantments, places that defy expectations and may disturb and disorient yet rekindle the romanticism of exploration and the meaning of place...A scintillating poke to our geographical imaginations." —Kirkus Reviews (STARRED review)

"This book will satisfy armchair travelers as well as those who appreciate thought-provoking journeys." —Library Journal

"Delightfully quirky." —Ron Charles, Washington Post

"Fascinating...A conversational, thoroughly researched, and very engaging armchair tour of what might be seen as a parallel planet to the one we live in every day—one in which nothing is ordinary...Alastair Bonnett is a most excellent traveling companion." —The Atlantic

"Unruly [Places] overflows with amazing examples of the world's hidden places." —Entertainment Weekly

"A chronicle of the world’s missing and hidden treasures...Bonnett manages to imbue the mundane—a traffic island in Newcastle, England—with the same gravitas given to the politically and historically weighty—an empty decoy city in North Korea meant to lure defectors from its southern neighbor." —The Daily Beast

"[Bonnett] takes us to one-of-a-kind, off-the-grid areas—from Cappadocia to Camp Zeist to Chitmahais—in this inspired, instructive travelogue on earth's lost spaces, breakaway nations, no-man's-lands, floating islands, and secret enclaves." —Elle

"Alastair Bonnett shows us that our maps still hold plenty of secrets...The geography of the unknown has never been so comprehensible." —Mother Jones

"Fascinating...A comforting read, much like dipping into a highly intelligent travel magazine, a book that teases the imagination while remaining firmly rooted in the factual." —Boston Globe

"If you’re someone who can happily while away the hours leafing through old atlases or scrolling through Google Maps, this is the book for you...[A] wonderful book." —Seattle Times

"An ideal travel tome."  —Pauline Frommer, Frommers.com

"Thought-provoking...Unruly Places is a timely call to rethink our relationship to the map." —Men's Journal

"Fizzingly entertaining and enlightening." —The Telegraph

“A fascinating delve into uncharted, forgotten, and lost places. . . . not just a trivia-tastic anthology of remote destinations but a nifty piece of psychogeography, explaining our human need for these cartographical conundrums." —Wanderlust 

“Unruly Places works to re-enchant the world by introducing us to unlikely places: places that exist but cannot be found on any map, places on maps that do not exist, islands that disappear or suddenly appear, deserts that form out of lakes, and labyrinths beneath cities. Carefully avoiding nostalgia and rose-tinted topophilia, Bonnett manages to reveal a myriad of ways in which place and geography still matter.” —Tim Cresswell, author of Place, An Introduction and professor of history and international affairs, Northeastern University

“Through dozens of punchy tales, Bonnett takes us on an imaginative grand tour of the most exceptional places in the world, reminding us that even in an age of seemingly total surveillance, the world is teeming with geographic mysteries.” —Bradley Garrett, author of Explore Everything

"Bonnett’s charming, pensive prose and light-handed erudition illuminates the stubborn human impulse to find a home in the unlikeliest places." —Publishers Weekly

"A wonderful collection of a few dozen geographical enchantments, places that defy expectations and may disturb and disorient yet rekindle the romanticism of exploration and the meaning of place...A scintillating poke to our geographical imaginations." —Kirkus Reviews (STARRED review)

"This book will satisfy armchair travelers as well as those who appreciate thought-provoking journeys." —Library Journal

"An inspiring compendium of unusual destinations that will ignite your wanderlust." --Shelf Awareness


"Fascinating...A conversational, thoroughly researched, and very engaging armchair tour of what might be seen as a parallel planet to the one we live in every day—one in which nothing is ordinary...Alastair Bonnett is a most excellent traveling companion." —The Atlantic

"A chronicle of the world’s missing and hidden treasures...Bonnett manages to imbue the mundane—a traffic island in Newcastle, England—with the same gravitas given to the politically and historically weighty—an empty decoy city in North Korea meant to lure defectors from its southern neighbor." —The Daily Beast

"[Bonnett] takes us to one-of-a-kind, off-the-grid areas—from Cappadocia to Camp Zeist to Chitmahais—in this inspired, instructive travelogue on earth's lost spaces, breakaway nations, no-man's-lands, floating islands, and secret enclaves." —Elle

"An ideal travel tome."  —Pauline Frommer, Frommers.com

"Fizzingly entertaining and enlightening." —The Telegraph

“A fascinating delve into uncharted, forgotten, and lost places. . . . not just a trivia-tastic anthology of remote destinations but a nifty piece of psychogeography, explaining our human need for these cartographical conundrums." —Wanderlust 

“Unruly Places works to re-enchant the world by introducing us to unlikely places: places that exist but cannot be found on any map, places on maps that do not exist, islands that disappear or suddenly appear, deserts that form out of lakes, and labyrinths beneath cities. Carefully avoiding nostalgia and rose-tinted topophilia, Bonnett manages to reveal a myriad of ways in which place and geography still matter.” —Tim Cresswell, author of Place, An Introduction and professor of history and international affairs, Northeastern University

“Through dozens of punchy tales, Bonnett takes us on an imaginative grand tour of the most exceptional places in the world, reminding us that even in an age of seemingly total surveillance, the world is teeming with geographic mysteries.” —Bradley Garrett, author of Explore Everything

"A wonderful collection of a few dozen geographical enchantments, places that defy expectations and may disturb and disorient yet rekindle the romanticism of exploration and the meaning of place...A scintillating poke to our geographical imaginations." —Kirkus Reviews (STARRED review)

"Bonnett’s charming, pensive prose and light-handed erudition illuminates the stubborn human impulse to find a home in the unlikeliest places." —Publishers Weekly

"This book will satisfy armchair travelers as well as those who appreciate thought-provoking journeys." —Library Journal

"This book will satisfy armchair travelers as well as those who appreciate thought-provoking journeys." —­Victor Or, Booklist

"Bonnett’s charming, pensive prose and light-handed erudition illuminates the stubborn human impulse to find a home in the unlikeliest places."Publisher’s Weekly "A fascinating delve into uncharted, forgotten, and lost places. . . . not just a trivia-tastic anthology of remote destinations but a nifty piece of psychogeography, explaining our human need for these cartographical conundrums."—Wanderlust   "Unruly Places works to re-enchant the world by introducing us to unlikely places: places that exist but cannot be found on any map, places on maps that do not exist, islands that disappear or suddenly appear, deserts that form out of lakes, and labyrinths beneath cities. Carefully avoiding nostalgia and rose-tinted topophilia, Bonnett manages to reveal a myriad of ways in which place and geography still matter." —Tim Cresswell, author of Place, An Introduction and professor of history and international affairs, Northeastern University "Through dozens of punchy tales, Bonnett takes us on an imaginative grand tour of the most exceptional places in the world, reminding us that even in an age of seemingly total surveillance, the world is teeming with geographic mysteries." —Bradley Garrett, author of Explore Everything

"A wonderful collection of a few dozen geographical enchantments, places that defy expectations and may disturb and disorient yet rekindle the romanticism of exploration and the meaning of place...A scintillating poke to our geographical imaginations." —Kirkus Reviews (STARRED review)

"Bonnett’s charming, pensive prose and light-handed erudition illuminates the stubborn human impulse to find a home in the unlikeliest places." —Publishers Weekly

"This book will satisfy armchair travelers as well as those who appreciate thought-provoking journeys." —Library Journal

"This book will satisfy armchair travelers as well as those who appreciate thought-provoking journeys." —­Victor Or, Booklist

“A fascinating delve into uncharted, forgotten, and lost places. . . . not just a trivia-tastic anthology of remote destinations but a nifty piece of psychogeography, explaining our human need for these cartographical conundrums." —Wanderlust 

"Fizzingly entertaining and enlightening." —The Telegraph

“Unruly Places works to re-enchant the world by introducing us to unlikely places: places that exist but cannot be found on any map, places on maps that do not exist, islands that disappear or suddenly appear, deserts that form out of lakes, and labyrinths beneath cities. Carefully avoiding nostalgia and rose-tinted topophilia, Bonnett manages to reveal a myriad of ways in which place and geography still matter.” —Tim Cresswell, author of Place, An Introduction and professor of history and international affairs, Northeastern University

“Through dozens of punchy tales, Bonnett takes us on an imaginative grand tour of the most exceptional places in the world, reminding us that even in an age of seemingly total surveillance, the world is teeming with geographic mysteries.” —Bradley Garrett, author of Explore Everything

"A wonderful collection of a few dozen geographical enchantments, places that defy expectations and may disturb and disorient yet rekindle the romanticism of exploration and the meaning of place...A scintillating poke to our geographical imaginations." --Kirkus Reviews (STARRED review)

"Bonnett’s charming, pensive prose and light-handed erudition illuminates the stubborn human impulse to find a home in the unlikeliest places." --Publishers Weekly

“A fascinating delve into uncharted, forgotten, and lost places. . . . not just a trivia-tastic anthology of remote destinations but a nifty piece of psychogeography, explaining our human need for these cartographical conundrums."—Wanderlust 

"Fizzingly entertaining and enlightening." -- The Telegraph

“Unruly Places works to re-enchant the world by introducing us to unlikely places: places that exist but cannot be found on any map, places on maps that do not exist, islands that disappear or suddenly appear, deserts that form out of lakes, and labyrinths beneath cities. Carefully avoiding nostalgia and rose-tinted topophilia, Bonnett manages to reveal a myriad of ways in which place and geography still matter.” —Tim Cresswell, author of Place, An Introduction and professor of history and international affairs, Northeastern University

“Through dozens of punchy tales, Bonnett takes us on an imaginative grand tour of the most exceptional places in the world, reminding us that even in an age of seemingly total surveillance, the world is teeming with geographic mysteries.” —Bradley Garrett, author of Explore Everything

"Bonnett’s charming, pensive prose and light-handed erudition illuminates the stubborn human impulse to find a home in the unlikeliest places." --Publisher's Weekly

“A fascinating delve into uncharted, forgotten, and lost places. . . . not just a trivia-tastic anthology of remote destinations but a nifty piece of psychogeography, explaining our human need for these cartographical conundrums."—Wanderlust 

"Fizzingly entertaining and enlightening." -- The Telegraph

“Unruly Places works to re-enchant the world by introducing us to unlikely places: places that exist but cannot be found on any map, places on maps that do not exist, islands that disappear or suddenly appear, deserts that form out of lakes, and labyrinths beneath cities. Carefully avoiding nostalgia and rose-tinted topophilia, Bonnett manages to reveal a myriad of ways in which place and geography still matter.” —Tim Cresswell, author of Place, An Introduction and professor of history and international affairs, Northeastern University

“Through dozens of punchy tales, Bonnett takes us on an imaginative grand tour of the most exceptional places in the world, reminding us that even in an age of seemingly total surveillance, the world is teeming with geographic mysteries.” —Bradley Garrett, author of Explore Everything

Über den Autor und weitere Mitwirkende

ALASTAIR BONNETT is Professor of Social Geography at Newcastle University. Previous books include What is Geography? (Sage, 2008) and How to Argue (Pearson, 2001). He has also contributed to history and current affairs magazines on a wide variety of topics, such as world population and radical nostalgia. Alastair was editor of the avant-garde, psychogeographical, magazine Transgressions: A Journal of Urban Exploration between 1994-2000. He was also involved for many years in situationist and anarchist politics. His latest research projects are about memories of the city and themes of loss and yearning in modern politics. -- Dieser Text bezieht sich auf eine andere Ausgabe: Gebundene Ausgabe .

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Amazon.com: 3.7 von 5 Sternen  23 Rezensionen
12 von 12 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen "A book of floating islands, dead cities and hidden kingdoms..." 16. Juli 2014
Von S. McGee - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe|Vine Kundenrezension eines kostenfreien Produkts (Was ist das?)
When Jeremiah Heaton hit the headlines last week for traveling across an arid stretch of southern Egypt to Bir Tawil and planting a flag on an unclaimed, uninhabited 800-square arid block of land that neither Sudan nor Egypt want, claiming it in the Heaton name as the Kingdom of North Sudan in order to fulfill a promise to his seven-year-old daughter Emily that he would make her a princess, I'm willing to bet that I'm one of a handful of people in the world that knew where the hell this place was or why on earth it was up for grabs in this way. Why? Because I'd read my way through Alastair Bonnett's fascinating assortment of profiles of this and dozens of other geographic oddities, from a 27 kilometer-long road that separates border posts (leaving the land in between technically neither Guinea nor Senegal, or both...) to the dead city of Agdan in Nagorno Karabakh, to tiny "gutterspaces" (available for sale, but just trying occupying one...) in New York City and the vast floating garbage islands in the Pacific. A few of these places I had heard of, like Sealand -- the attempt to build an independent nation on an abandoned oil rig -- but others, like layers of enclaves, were new to me. (Imagine: an Indian community, inside a Bangladeshi enclave, in an Indian village, inside Bangladesh...)

This book was a source of endless fascination, and left me pondering an equally endless numbers of questions revolving around our relationship to the space we occupy, and to the ways that our sense of identity is bound up with that space. We may believe that we live in an era where geographical exploration is a thing of the past, but that is less true that we might believe, as Bonnett points out. Part of it may simply be a matter of describing what we mean when we use the phrase. Then, too, it turns out that there ARE places on which most of us have never yet set foot, like North Sentinel Island. We don't know what the locals call it, because we've never had any contact with them. Ever. They've killed people who have landed there, and have made it VERY clear they don't want us there. (Their islands are near the Andaman and Nicobar islands.) And we've decided to let 'em be.

There are 47 short segments here, ranging from traffic islands to cities of the living inhabiting vast cemetaries, from pirate communities to invented nations in central Europe. I did sometimes think that it might have been more interesting to have read a work of narrative nonfiction, in which Bonnett presented his thesis and used these as anecdotes, rather than a book that is composed simply of vignettes (it ended up feeling a lot like a coffee table book, only without the pictures), ultimately that didn't spoil my pleasure. And Bonnett does a great job in presenting his thesis about our relationship to place -- and to geography itself -- in both his introduction and conclusion, so I didn't feel short-changed.

On the contrary, this was a delightful book. Some critics have noted you can find this content online. Sure -- if you know what to look for. This is a topic I've been interested in for at least a decade, ever since I attended a seminar on "Imaginary Nations" at the New School in New York, and I've got a graduate degree in international relations, with a strong interest in geopolitics (and hence, border issues). Nonetheless, half of these topics I had never even heard of. And to have them all presented in one place, engagingly written, is a great starting point for anyone whose curiosity is likely to be piqued by the topic. Does it answer all questions? Nope. And my advance review copy, alas, didn't include a bibliography or notes.

This is often quirky and always fascinating, and if it doesn't inspire in a curious-minded reader an interest in even the space around them -- and what may lie beneath the surface or hidden around a corner -- I'd be astonished. It's a reminder that what we see when we travel and what goes unnoticed and unremarked until some apparently eccentric guy like Mr. Heaton intent on making his daughter a princess brings it to our attention, can be fascinating. We may never ever want to visit Bir Tawil -- Bonnett notes that satellite photos show there are no buildings and that even its desert tracks have disappeared. But it's rare that I finish reading a book and feel that I've made as many discoveries along the way, about places like Bir Tawil, as I did in the course of reading this.
8 von 9 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen A strong recommendation 12. Juli 2014
Von David Wilson - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe|Verifizierter Kauf
Before I bought the book I read both the favorable and the critical reviews and I was prepared to be a bit disappointed. On the contrary, I found the book completely fascinating. There is rich detail, interesting facts and high-quality writing throughout. As a senior citizen who's done a lot of traveling over the years, I was surprised that I hadn't even heard of most of the places in the book and I commend the author for his most impressive research skills. I buy a lot of books on Amazon -- usually several a week -- and I'd place this book in the top three I've purchased in the last several years (I've never written a review before but this book deserves an excellent one). Great reading.
5 von 5 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Great read for geography and travel fans 9. Juni 2014
Von D. Greenbaum - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe|Vine Kundenrezension eines kostenfreien Produkts (Was ist das?)
"Unruly Places" is a series of short essays, grouped thematically, about various unique spaces, both natural and unnatural. These spaces are not organized by geography but rather by what kind of spaces they are, i.e. lost cities, no-mans' lands, breakaway nations, and even floating islands. Each essay is a short, digestible chunk, making this book really easy to read in bits and pieces. The writing style is playful and authentic, and you are almost certain to both learn a few new things and pause every now and then to think. The book doesn't include any maps, but each place has a latitude and longitude associated with it, making it quite enjoyable to pop open Google Maps and explore any interesting place you might find.

"Unruly Places" is a unique and fun travelogue that will appeal to anyone interested in a few of the less tame places on our very well-mapped and explored globe.
5 von 6 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Fascinating Look at Geography and the Idea of "Place" 27. Mai 2014
Von J. Wiles Parker - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe|Vine Kundenrezension eines kostenfreien Produkts (Was ist das?)
Warning: This is not a travel guide. It is a book about the history and significance of boundaries, or a lack therof. It is not meant to be comprehensive. With Unruly Places, author Alastair Bonnett challenges readers to rethink the idea of "place" and how people interact with the world. The book consists of eight main sections that contain short essays on 4 to 10 different places that somehow connect to the section title. The essays are only about 4-5 pages each and are easily digestible. One of the challenges of reading the book is orienting to what the author is aiming to do. This is not exactly easy, at the start, but becomes more so the more you get into it. Since Bonnett is a professor of social geography, his expertise is in how we look at the world and the places we inhabit or don't inhabit. There is a philosophical bent throughout the book along with it being filled with locations mundane and extraordinary. While it would be easy to believe that this book is telling you about why this part of the world or that part is unique or inscrutable, what you really get a tour of ideas and concepts regarding people's perception of place. Each essay does not strictly adhere to the heading. Rather, the attempt is to provide background, history, a sense of time, and, in the end, place. Because the idea of place is such an innate part of human existence and how we relate to our surroundings, a lack of place or feeling that one has no place is just as valid a feeling as seen throughout the book.

Some people will love the almost random nature of the writing of Unruly Places. Others will likely complain that it feels too disconnected at times. Personally, I quite enjoyed the trip through different theories on the idea of place. Each of the eight sections is basically a theory, after all. This could have been just a quick read, but the author turns the book into something to be delved into and studied. The anecdotes are not merely stories to amuse or entertain. They are teaching moments and thinking moments. While, in the end, there does seem rather a large emphasis on the part of the world Bonnett is most familiar with, he still manages to raise valid discussion points and look at his part of the world with a different lens than what he used to. By looking at the world in a different way, he brings to light the fact that boundaries are difficult, necessary, and fascinating while also being limiting. Unruly Places: Lost Spaces, Secret Cities, and Other Inscrutable Geographies is an intriguing read that forces you to look at your surroundings and reconsider your own place in the world.
10 von 13 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen Fascinating topics, half baked coverage of those topic 30. Juni 2014
Von Gagewyn - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe|Vine Kundenrezension eines kostenfreien Produkts (Was ist das?)
Unruly Places is a collection of short write ups on unusual geographical oddities. It covers Sealandia, the country on an abandoned oil rig off the English coast, Anagram, the world'slargest dead city, Sandy Island, an island which was mistakenly recorded on nautical charts hundreds of years ago and only proven not to exist and removed in the last20 years. Each chapter is about 5 pages long.

The topics were great. Each place chosen has an interesting story.

But, the writing was not so great. There aren't any citations. I have an advance reading copy, so maybe mine is missing cites, but when I use "Look Inside" I don't see any cites in the final released book either. Also, the writing is choppy. Too often, the book tries to wax philosophical about how places make us feel and the mystery of the unknown, etc. This feels like fluff that gets in the way of the story. And there's a lot of fluff.

To me, this is a book that would have been amazing 30 years ago. But now with the internet, I can run a quick search and find better information and a more readable story for each place.
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