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Tubes: A Journey to the Center of the Internet
 
 

Tubes: A Journey to the Center of the Internet [Kindle Edition]

Andrew Blum
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Produktbeschreibungen

Pressestimmen

“Fascinating and unique. . . . [A] captivating behind-the-scenes tour of how (and where) the Internet works. . . . [Blum] has a gift for breathing life into his subjects.” (Kirkus Reviews (starred review))

“Every web site, every email, every instant message travels through real junctions in a real network of real cables. It’s all too awesome to behold. Andrew Blum’s fascinating book demystifies the earthly geography of this most ethereal terra incognita.” (Joshua Foer, bestselling author of Moonwalking with Einstein)

Tubes is an absorbing tale of this new technology, as well as a wonderful account of the Internet’s growth and the people who made it possible.” (Science News)

“Clever, enterprising . . . Tubes uncovers an Internet that resembles nothing so much as a fantastic steam-punk version of itself.” (Boston Globe)

“Engaging. . . . Full of memorable images that make the internet’s complex architecture easier to comprehend. . . . Blum leaves readers pondering questions that would not have occurred to them before and better informed about an innovation most of us take for granted.” (The Guardian)

“A charming look at the physical infrastructure that underlies the Web.” (Scientific American)

“A satisfying postmodern quest. . . . The history, in particular, is one of the best and most memorable I have ever read.” (New Scientist)

“Blum paints a vivid picture of the Internet, and gives a sense that it is more than just the mysterious interstitial digital space between your computer and mine. It is, increasingly, the backbone that supports our daily life, and Mr. Blum is an able anatomist.” (New York Journal of Books)

“Quixotic and winning. . . . Valuable, comic. . . . [Blum has] a knack for bundling packets of data into memorable observations. What makes Tubes more than an unusual sort of travel book, is [Blum’s] sense of moral curiosity.” (New York Times)

“Ingeniously beguiling. . . . Blum is a smart, imaginative, evocative writer who embraces the task of making his readers feel the wonder represented by these unprepossessing objects.” (Laura Miller, Salon)

“An engaging reminder that, cyber-Utopianism aside, the internet is as much a thing of flesh and steel as any industrial-age lumber mill or factory. It is also an excellent introduction to the nuts and bolts of how exactly it all works.” (The Economist)

“A fascinating exploration of the physical nature of the Internet, and how the ‘network of networks’ came to be the way it is.” (Shelf Awareness)

“Engaging. . . . Blum is a natural storyteller.” (PopMatters)

“Enlightening. . . . A zippy history of a phenomenon that, as a society, captivates us, connects us, and vexes us.” (Guernica)

“With infectious wonder, Blum introduces us to the Internet’s geeky wizards and takes us on an amiably guided tour of the world they’ve created, a world of wires and routers through which most of us daily wander . . . but which few of us have ever really seen.” (Donovan Hohn, author of Moby-Duck)

“Compelling and profound. . . . For the first time, Tubes brings the ‘network of networks’ into stirring, and surprising, relief. You will never open an email in quite the same way again.” (Tom Vanderbilt, bestselling author of Traffic)

“A compelling story of an altogether new realm where the virtual world meets the physical.” (Paul Goldberger, author of Why Architecture Matters)

“At once funny, prosaic, sinister and wise . . . A beautifully written account of the true human cost of all our remote connectivity.” (Bella Bathurst, author of The Lighthouse Stevensons)

Kurzbeschreibung

“Andrew Blum plunges into the unseen but real ether of the Internet in a journey both compelling and profound….You will never open an email in quite the same way again.”
—Tom Vanderbilt, New York Times bestselling author of Traffic

In Tubes, Andrew Blum, a correspondent at Wired magazine, takes us on an engaging, utterly fascinating tour behind the scenes of our everyday lives and reveals the dark beating heart of the Internet itself. A remarkable journey through the brave new technological world we live in, Tubes is to the early twenty-first century what Soul of a New Machine—Tracy Kidder’s classic story of the creation of a new computer—was to the late twentieth.


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3.0 von 5 Sternen
3.0 von 5 Sternen
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2 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen What makes the virtual of the internet tangible 12. August 2012
Von BLehner
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe
Who has never wondered what the internet is actually made of? We know it's there, somewhere, but is there an actual place the internet can be found? This question answers Andrew Blum in his book Tubes and the title (almost) reveals it all.
If you're anything like me, namely pretty clueless as to why technical things in general work, yet willing get a better understanding about why it's even possible to surf the net by the click of a mouse, you will certainly find this book as appealing as I did. It was easy for me to empathize with Blum, following his journey to map the place called the internet. Conversationally written, the author knows how to set the mood for the rather technical topic, embedding his personal perceptions into the information he gathers along the way. Despite the fetching narrative the exploration of miles of fibre-optic cables and vast data-warehouses was admittedly a bit on the dry side. Then again, I should have realized this would be the case earlier on, so I can hardly blame the author for that. Overall I found this trip into the world of the tactile side of the internet, well written and interesting enough to keep my attention almost all the way through, and I bet that those more amenable to this topic will definitely find it to be an enjoyable and informative read.
In short: A tech-heavy look behind the scenes of what makes the virtual of the internet tangible!

Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from Penguin. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own.
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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen Von Maschinen mit blinkenden Lichtern 17. Januar 2014
Von Peer Sylvester TOP 1000 REZENSENT
Format:Kindle Edition|Verifizierter Kauf
Als ein Eichhörnchen sein Internetkabel anknabbert, reift in Andrew Blum die Idee, das "physische Internet" zu besuchen, also die Knotenpunkte, Router und Kabellagen, die das virtuelle Netz erst möglich machen. Eine tolle, vermutlich einzigartige Idee! Und Blum besucht wirklich potentiell interessante Orte: Er beginnt mit den historischen Orten wo das Internet begann, besucht die Orte, in denen erstmals mehrere Netze zusammengeschlossen wurden und aucn DE-CIX in Frankfurt (der Internetknoten mit dem höchsten Durchsatz). Er begutachtet die Anschlüsse der Unterseekabel und ist dabei, als eines verlegt wird. Und er besucht große Datencenter.
Leider stellt sich bald heraus: Letztlich besucht er Kabel und (wie er selbst schreibt) große Maschinen mit blinkenden Lichtern, die eben so aussehen, wie große Router eben aussehen. Das wird bald redundant und auch etwas ermüdend. Selbst der Autor kann nicht verhehlen, dass er sich etwas spektakuläreres vorgestellt hatte. Doch dafür er kann er letztlich nichts.

Und doch... Ganz kann ich mich des Eindruckes nicht erwehren, dass ein Autor wie Roach oder Bryson noch mehr aus der Idee hätte herausholen können. Die ganze Geschichte ist zu lang, mit zu vielen Wiederholungen. Die Erläuterungen sind lang, aber gehen z.T. am Thema etwas vorbei, da sich Blum nicht ganz einigen kann, auf welche Vorbildung er sich stützen kann (manchmal setzt er viel vorraus, anderes bleibt unerklärt. Einige wichtige Infos kommen erst im Vorletzten Kapitel!). Er beschriebt mehr, als dass er wirklich etwas erzählt (Die witzigen passagen sind fast ausnahmslos Anekdoten, die andere in seiner Gegenwart erzählen und die er in direkter Rede wiedergibt). Es gibt einige Highlights, z.B.
Lesen Sie weiter... ›
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2.0 von 5 Sternen A grown up newspaper article missing any conclusion 10. März 2014
Format:Kindle Edition|Verifizierter Kauf
This book is exactly what you can see on the title: The author tries to find "the internet" in the physical world and pays visit to the big data and network centers in the world. That's all, nothing more, nothing less. You can learn a little bit about history and design of the internet but don't expect too much. For me personally it read a bit like a pimped newspaper article sold as a book; Like reading on and on but nothing changes. At some point in time you'll have it finished the book and that's it.
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0 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Technik-Fetisch pur 14. Juni 2012
Von Thomas
Format:Kindle Edition
Absolut klasse. Für Netzwerk-Fetischisten und Internet-Junkies das allerhöchste.
Hätte mir gewünscht etwas mehr Info zu Routertechnik zu lesen, das geht aber wahrscheinlich zu sehr ins Detail, da steigen dann normalsterbliche aus :-)
Sehr Netzwerk- und Switchpoint-lastig, wenig DataCenter, aber trotzdem interessant. Wer wollte nicht schon immer mal wissen was ein Fiber-Vault ist, und wie das Transatlantische Seekabel verlegt wurde.
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Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen auf Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 3.8 von 5 Sternen  139 Rezensionen
108 von 119 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen The Real Deal, from the Real Guys 29. Mai 2012
Von Daniel Golding - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe
I sit, writing this review, in my darkened office in an Internet data center, in Ashburn, VA, the hub described in Tubes. I build these things for a living, and, when my time on this planet is up, I'll be able to say, with some great satisfaction, that I was part of the small army that built the "plumbing" of the Internet - data centers, fiber, DWDM terminals, regen sites, routers, switches. The guts, not the pretty developer work.

From that point of view, I must strongly endorse Tubes by Andrew Blum. I first met Andrew at a meeting of core Internet architects - his intellectual curiosity was striking. He sat in our meetings, went to our bars, listened to our bad stories. Andrew is an excellent writer who talked to the real guys (and girls) who built the Internet. Not an early research network, or an NSF/DOD project, or some web page or search engine - the REAL Internet.

If you want to know how it really fits together, how the Internet really works, read this book. If you are an aspiring network engineer - you must read this book, to really learn something about what you claim to know. If you are a layman - this book will give you an appreciation of the real Internet - behind the glitzy Flash, the addictive MMOs, the electronic storefronts, the content delivery networks - the Tubes. Now, I have to go back and feed the beast. Read the book - this is what Where Wizards Stay Up Late should have been and was not.
28 von 29 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Mostly will appeal to the alpha geeks... 6. Juni 2012
Von 35-year Technology Consumer - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition|Verifizierter Kauf
..."The Internet" (as most of us have come to understand its popular rise in our consciousness over a generation) has been described with many metaphors: clouds, tubes, webs (as well as Arthur C. Clark's broad category of magic for any sufficiently advanced technology).

"Tubes" doesn't really create new ground in sustaining or refuting any of these concepts. Instead, it captures the physicality behind the magic that delivers all those digital pieces to us through and examination of how the physical layer of the Internet grew.

After a squirrel-induced outage at at his Brooklyn home, Andrew Blum set out to expand the trace of wires behind his furniture, and see where all that data came from. The result of his findings are here, and he presents us with insider looks at the following:
-The physical parts of the network that grew by chance in its early days
-The physical parts of the network that grew by design as it matured
-The physical parts of the network where data moves and where data rests.

The results: detailed descriptions of the large centers where the connections of large backbone providers intersect and move data, tours of some of the places where undersea cables emerge from the depths to tie continents together digitally, and visits to the one of the factory analogs of the Information Age: the data centers that some increasingly trust more than they trust their own local storage options.

I've had my own experiences visiting facilities like these, and it's quite an accomplishment to get a book-length treatment of them. How much can you write about servers, switches, hubs, routers and cable runs? As it turns out, a lot, and Blum does so in an engaging and accessible way.

This book may not appeal to the general reader, but it will appeal to those who appreciate the kind of infrastructure we often take for granted. If you appreciate modern roads, modern sewage systems, clean drinking water delivered to your tap and a reliable supply of electricity --and have more than a passing interest in how any of these things became available to us-- then you will probably enjoy this book. When it comes to computers, computing and understanding the connectivity made possible by the Internet, most homes have their alpha geek...and that's who will most enjoy this book.
54 von 61 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen Interesting, But Definitely For Techies 5. Mai 2012
Von Reader from Washington, DC - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe|Vine Kundenrezension eines kostenfreien Produkts (Was ist das?)
After a squirrel living in his backyard chewed through wiring connecting his computer to the internet, journalist Andrew Blum became curious -- where, he asked himself, do all the computers, cables and routers 'live' that physically power the internet? And who runs the companies that maintain them?

This question was covered years ago in a series of fascinating Wired magazine articles written by novelist Bruce Sterling, so I was eager to read Blum's account. Blum traveled from one city to another, looking at inconspicuous office buildings filled with equipment, talking to executives about underwater ocean cables that are thousands of miles long, and tries to give the reader a series of mental pictures of how the internet actually 'works.'

The book is interesting, but his efforts to draw word pictures of complex equipment, how the internet functions, and the engineers who maintain it are somewhat rambling and disorderly, and he assumes a level of knowledge on the reader's part of things like internet IP addresses.

If I weren't a bit of a techie, I would have given up after the first 10 pages. This type of subject cries out for tight vignettes and colorful prose.

I think techies like myself will like it, but the average reader will be bewildered or bored.You do need to be a bit of a geek to understand the book.
20 von 24 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Interesting, even if it's pretty complex 14. Mai 2012
Von DDC - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe|Vine Kundenrezension eines kostenfreien Produkts (Was ist das?)
Tubes is a interesting book about a subject most people (me included) never consider: what exactly is beyond the screen in front of us? In answering this question, the author takes you all over the virtual and physical world. It is written as a journey of discovery: both on the subject and, to a lesser extent, of the author's personal feelings.

As other reviewers have noted, this book presents some complex IT concepts. They are well explained, but it's easy to get lost here and there. Even when you get lost, it doesn't detract of the overall story and learning experience. For the most part, everything is well explained and you don't need any specific background before reading this book.

The author has a nice writing style and the prose flows well. I don't think the author achieved the kind of casual brilliance of Malcolm Gladwell (Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking) or Michael Lewis (The Big Short: Inside the Doomsday Machine), but this isn't a criticism. To the contrary, the fact I compared them speaks volumes about the author's writing and I thought he was pretty close to them at times.

This book is perfect for people interested in: engineering/IT, modern history, and urban archeology. I have included urban archeology because the book really delves into all the places you've never heard about or walked by and never thought about; for me, this was the best part of the Tubes. I recommend this book.
10 von 11 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
1.0 von 5 Sternen Incredibly Boring 7. Dezember 2012
Von Andrew Moriarty - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition|Verifizierter Kauf
I made a valiant attempt to finish this book, but couldn't do it. After wading through pages and pages of unfocused discussion of the so called 'journey' I finally gave up. The book is neither technically detailed, intellectually stimulating, or an entertaining story. Rather it is a collection of disconnected musing.
If you want a technical discussion, this is not it. If you want a story of the people involved, this is not it. If you want a history of how things evolved, this is not it. I'm sorry I bought it.
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