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True History of the Kelly Gang: A Novel (Vintage International) (Englisch) Taschenbuch – 4. Dezember 2001


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Produktinformation

  • Taschenbuch: 384 Seiten
  • Verlag: Vintage; Auflage: Reprint (4. Dezember 2001)
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ISBN-10: 0375724672
  • ISBN-13: 978-0375724671
  • Größe und/oder Gewicht: 13,1 x 2,1 x 20,4 cm
  • Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung: 4.2 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (4 Kundenrezensionen)
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: Nr. 622.459 in Fremdsprachige Bücher (Siehe Top 100 in Fremdsprachige Bücher)

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"What is it about we Australians, eh?" demands a schoolteacher near the end of Peter Carey's True History of the Kelly Gang. "Do we not have a Jefferson? A Disraeli? Might not we find someone better to admire than a horse-thief and a murderer?" It's the author's sole nod to the contradictory feelings Ned Kelly continues to evoke today, more than a century after his death. A psychopathic killer to some, a crusading folk hero to others, Kelly was a sharpshooting outlaw who eluded a brutal police manhunt for nearly two years. For better or worse, he's now a part of the Australian national myth. Indeed, the opening ceremonies for the Sydney Olympics featured an army of Ned Kellys dancing about to Irish music, which puts him in the symbolic company of both kangaroos and Olivia Newton-John.

What's to be gained from telling this illiterate bushranger's story yet again? Quite a lot, as it turns out. For starters, there is the remarkable vernacular poetry of Carey's narrative voice. Fierce, funny, ungrammatical, steeped in Irish legends and the frontier's moral code, this voice is the novel's great achievement--and perhaps the greatest in Carey's distinguished career. It paints a vivid picture of an Australia where English landowners skim off the country's best territory while government land grants allow the settlers just enough acreage to starve. Cheated, lied to, and persecuted by the authorities at every opportunity, young Kelly retains no faith in his colonial masters. What he does trust, oddly, is the power of words:

And here is the thing about them men they was Australians they knew full well the terror of the unyielding law the historic memory of UNFAIRNESS were in their blood and a man might be a bank clerk or an overseer he might never have been lagged for nothing but still he knew in his heart what it were to be forced to wear the white hood in prison he knew what it were to be lashed for looking a warder in the eye ... so the knowledge of unfairness were deep in his bone and in his marrow.
Ned Kelly as literary hero? Strangely enough, that's what he becomes, at least in Carey's rendering. Pouring his heart out in a series of letters to the country at large, Kelly wants nothing more than to be heard--and for the dirt-poor son of an Irish convict, that's an audacious ambition indeed. It's not so surprising, then, that his story continues to speak to Australians. Like all colonial countries, Australia was built at a steep human price, and the memory of all those silenced voices lives on. True History of the Kelly Gang takes its epigraph from Faulkner: "The past is not dead. It is not even past." And like Faulkner's own vast chronicle of dispossession, it's haunted by tragedies as large as history itself. --Mary Park -- Dieser Text bezieht sich auf eine andere Ausgabe: Gebundene Ausgabe .

Pressestimmen

“A spectacular feat of imagination.”–The Boston Globe

“Vastly entertaining…. Triumphantly eclectic, as if Huck Finn and Shakespeare had joined forces to prettify the legend of Jesse James.”–The New York Times

“The ingenuity, empathy, and poetic ear that the novelist brings to his feat of imposture cannot be rated too high.”–John Updike, The New Yorker

“Carey succeeds in creating an account that not only feels authentic but also passes as a serious novel and solid, old-fashioned ‘entertainment.’ A big, meaty novel, blending Dickens and Cormac McCarthy with a distinctly
Australian strain of melancholy.”–San Francisco Chronicle

“Abravura performance…. Rewards the persistent reader with a powerful emotional experience.”–The Wall Street Journal

“Carey’s pen writes with an ink that is two parts archaic and one part modern and colors a prose that rocks and cajoles the reader into a certainty that Ned Kelly is fit company not only for Jack Palance and Clint Eastwood but for Thomas Jefferson and perhaps even a bodhisattva.”–Los Angeles Times

“The power and charm of [this book] arise not from fidelity to facts but rather from the voice Carey invents for Ned Kelly….”–Time

“So adroit that you never doubt it’s Kelly’s own words you’re reading in the headlong, action-packed story.”–Newsweek

“This novel is worth our best attention.”–The Washington Post Book World

“An avalanche of a novel…. Cary has raised a national legend to the level of an international myth.”–Christian Science Monitor

“Packed with incident, alive with comedy and pathos . . . contains pretty much everything you could ask of a novel.” –The New York Times Book Review

“The ingenuity, empathy, and poetic ear that the novelist brings to his feat of imposture cannot be rated too high.” –John Updike, The New Yorker

“Carey’s pen writes with an ink that is two parts archaic and one part modern and colors a prose that rocks and cajoles the reader into a certainty that Ned Kelly is fit company not only for Jack Palance and Clint Eastwood but for Thomas Jefferson and perhaps even a bodhisattva.” –Los Angeles Times

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7 von 8 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von Simon Kazianka (kazianka@gmx.at) am 30. Oktober 2001
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
Have you ever come across a myth named Ned Kelly? If yes, forget everything about all those folk tales and join the ignorant mob who are rushing to the bookstore to get a copy of Peter Carey's Commonwealth-and Booker prize winning novel "True History of the Kelly Gang".
In his seventh novel Peter Carey tells the historically-based story of Ned Kelly and his Irish-rooted fellow-outlaws, from their early days to their early deaths. In the case of this brilliant story, narrated in the first person, "tell", might be an inappropriate term because the voice Carey invent leads us to believe that Ned Kelly himself is the author of these highly vernacular lines. Poor grammar and minimal punctuation make the book hard to read to begin with, but once you have entered it you will never want to leave the colonial South of Australia. Using these unpromising language resources, Carey makes Ned write down his life-story for his daughter (whom he never meets) to justify and rectify all the crimes he is accused of.
But can this Ned Kelly really be accused of anything?
In 19th century Australia, where British landowners settle the best parts of the country and poor settlers nearly starve to death, Ned Kelly grows up in a poor Irish family. Carey gives us great insight into these harsh times when Ned is, from his childhood on, confronted with death, prison, betrayal and permanent unjust treatment at the hands of the police. The young horse thief Kelly grows into a bank robber, bandit, kidnapper and therefore the most wanted man in the whole colony. Yet, his sense of responsibility towards his family, his loyalty to his fellows and his never-ending struggle for justice make him a warm-hearted, loveable hero and ensure him a place in the hearts of Australians to this day.
Lesen Sie weiter... ›
Kommentar War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein Feedback senden...
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Wir konnten Ihre Stimmabgabe leider nicht speichern. Bitte erneut versuchen
Von HORAK am 20. August 2004
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
Mr Carey's novel relates the epic life of Ned Kelly in Australia in the second half of the 19th century. The text comes in the form of 13 parcels of varying length (from 7 to 50 pages). Sometimes they are sheets of National Bank or Bank of New South Wales letterhead, a cloth booklet, octavo pages, open envelopes providing space for text, a pocket diary or the reverse side of advertising fliers. They cover Ned's adventurous life until the manuscript abruptly terminates when he was 26 years old and it is told in a tone so wild and passionate that the reader often believes that the bushranger is speaking to him from the grave! It is a breathtaking account of an existence marked by a cascade of events where Ned is in turn a reformer, a criminal, a horse thief, a farmer, a bushranger and an orphan. Ned's voice is very convincing, continually creating new surprises on every page despite the plainness of his language, or rather perhaps because of it. Actually his uneducated voice is very much part of the originality of Mr Carey's novel.
The critics have ranked Mr Carey next to Charles Dickens and Lawrence Sterne - very rightly so, in my opinion.
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Wir konnten Ihre Stimmabgabe leider nicht speichern. Bitte erneut versuchen
Von mick trick am 10. Oktober 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verifizierter Kauf
The book gives a lot of new info, but stops short after the death of Kelly. It would have been a 5 star if it had completed the families history also.
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1 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von Ein Kunde am 6. Februar 2002
Format: Taschenbuch
Der australische - umstrittene Nationalheld Ned Kelly und Gründer der legendären Kellygang ist der Protagonist dieses Buches, welches sein Leben auch aus seiner Perpektive schildert.
Peter Carey hat Ned Kelly gut eingefangen und beschreibt die Gegend zwischen Melbourne und dem Murray River treffend gut.
Einen Kauf wert für alle Australien-Interessierten die nicht nur mit Touristenartikeln von Ned Kelly in Beechworth oder Echuca zugeklatscht werden wollen.
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Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen auf Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 155 Rezensionen
29 von 30 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Ned Kelly; an Australian myth 30. Oktober 2001
Von Simon Kazianka (kazianka@gmx.at) - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
Have you ever come across a myth named Ned Kelly? If yes, forget everything about all those folk tales and join the ignorant mob who are rushing to the bookstore to get a copy of Peter Carey's Commonwealth-and Booker prize winning novel "True History of the Kelly Gang".
In his seventh novel Peter Carey tells the historically-based story of Ned Kelly and his Irish-rooted fellow-outlaws, from their early days to their early deaths. In the case of this brilliant story, narrated in the first person, "tell", might be an inappropriate term because the voice Carey invent leads us to believe that Ned Kelly himself is the author of these highly vernacular lines. Poor grammar and minimal punctuation make the book hard to read to begin with, but once you have entered it you will never want to leave the colonial South of Australia. Using these unpromising language resources, Carey makes Ned write down his life-story for his daughter (whom he never meets) to justify and rectify all the crimes he is accused of.
But can this Ned Kelly really be accused of anything?
In 19th century Australia, where British landowners settle the best parts of the country and poor settlers nearly starve to death, Ned Kelly grows up in a poor Irish family. Carey gives us great insight into these harsh times when Ned is, from his childhood on, confronted with death, prison, betrayal and permanent unjust treatment at the hands of the police. The young horse thief Kelly grows into a bank robber, bandit, kidnapper and therefore the most wanted man in the whole colony. Yet, his sense of responsibility towards his family, his loyalty to his fellows and his never-ending struggle for justice make him a warm-hearted, loveable hero and ensure him a place in the hearts of Australians to this day.
From his youth on Ned follows the voice of his heart, which tells him not to obey the unjust oppressors, and the police therefore pursue him. In his account of this ongoing pursuit with numerous action-packed showdowns, Carey spins an entertaining, deep and profound characterization of his protagonist. The reader is drawn into the story and is able to feel what Ned Kelly feels: anger, sadness, happiness and also love. In this powerfully narrated and heart-rendering story the reader is always on Ned Kelly's side and close to his thoughts. As we track Kelly's inner feelings and motivation we are also faced with a dilemma: should we sympathize with the outlaw or condemn him. The reader is enthralled throughout the novel and identifies with the hero, although much blood is shed. The novelist wins the battle for the reader's hearts and minds. But will Ned Kelly survive the last showdown?
33 von 35 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Something Worth Reading about Ned Kelly 11. Januar 2001
Von "jaui" - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
After studying in Melbourne, Australia for about 4 years, I had fallen across texts and historical accounts on the famous Australian bushranger Ned Kelly. Most of the time, they were quite bland and very vague - what they stressed most was that Ned Kelly was someone who was a mystery, a folk tale.
Another book that has dealt with trying to get into the real character of Ned Kelly was Our Sunshine. I feel that "True History of the Kelly Gang" gives us a more in depth feel into one view of what the true Ned Kelly was like. The characters in the book comes alive and at times, you forget that this was not written by Carey but by Ned himself (which is what Carey wants the reader to do). The grammatical errors and the lack of punctuation did become confusing at times but, trust me, you get used to it and it also makes the story come alive and makes it very, very believable. It is almost like the new phase of Reality TV but better.
The book deals with all the events that Ned Kelly went through and Carey weaves all these events with Kelly's personal life and an example of what he might have felt during different stages of his life. The layout of the "project" is given to the reader in a package form from his younger days to his early death. It is extremely detailed and it is obvious that a lot of painstaking research was poured into the book and it is evident that Carey actually became the Ned that he was painting in his mind.
This is a book that has everything - murder, love, family, loyalty, betrayal, action and most of all, it is able to draw the reader into the situation to feel what all the characters are feeling. It forces the reader to think about whether Kelly was in the right or in the wrong and it creates debate between knowledge that we all might have past before about this character.
It is hard for someone who had never heard of the Kelly story before to really get into this book and to truly appreciate it, some history has to be studied. This is what makes the book fascinating as it is remarkable to see how Carey has weaved the events to make it feel like a flowing river of events. Basically, these parcels/manuscripts that have been written are from Ned Kelly himself to his daughter so as to give evidence that he is not the man the newspapers portray him as. It is a touching and very emotional account of a man that has been wronged for most of his life. But we also have to pause and think whether what all he is saying is true or what he wants to be true.
As a teenager, I recommend it to all age groups (I mean, if it passes for teenagers, it should be able to pass for everyone) as it can be read on many levels - as a story or as a trip into real history.
This book serves its purpose of bringing Ned Kelly to life and I salute and thank Peter Carey for doing that for me.
32 von 35 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
An Adjectival Wonder 20. Januar 2001
Von Keith D. Gumery - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
History has always been written by the victors of wars, those adhering to the prevailing ideology of the day, or the survivors. In Peter Carey's new novel, the best this wonderful writer has yet produced, history gets told by Ned Kelly, the mythic Australian bush-ranger, who is none of those things. The result, Carey tells us, is a "true" history, told in the first-person voice of Kelly, a voice of Faulknerian sweep and rhythm written in a style based on real surviving letters in Kelly's own hand. And what a voice it is. Sentences run on, they lack punctuation or accurate grammar, they fold into themselves, or whip from emotion to emotion, subject to subject. Yet Carey is always in control of the sentence, using it to charm, inform,and manipulate.
The precise nature of Ned Kelly's lawlessness is central to Carey's book, for most of Kelly's crimes are seen as reactions against a cruel and unjust system being enacted against immigrants by the predominantly British system in Australia. For example, when Kelly is accused of stealing another horse, but when the case comes to trial the dates do not match up, the accused being out of the area when the theft was alleged to have taken place. The result of the trial is still a conviction. Kelly is found "guilty of receiving a horse not yet legally stolen." Finally, when Ned Kelly and his three companions are being hunted for the attempted murder of a policeman-something Kelly denies in his history-there is a shootout at Stringybark Creek resulting in the deaths of three constables. Kelly realizes that the only way to discourage the locals from turning them in is to pay them more than the reward money being offered by the authorities. After some audacious bank robberies to raise such funds the Kelly gang are cornered in Mrs. Jones' hotel in Glenrowan. Three are killed and Kelly is captured in his newly created(and now iconic) suit of armor. In 1880 he was tried and hanged. Kelly is a victim, like Jack Maggs in Carey's last novel, of a system that pulls him into a life of crime and judicial punishment. As Maggs is apprenticed to a house-breaker in Victorian London, so Kelly is apprenticed to a bush-ranger in this novel. They struggle, feeling that they can escape their lot in life, but the system pulls them down. Both men explain themselves--Maggs in the invisible writing he leaves for his errant adopted son, and Kelly in his "true history."
Carey's epigram in this book is taken from William Faulkner: "The past is not dead. It is not even past." This is his theme, for Carey is examining what it meant to be Australian in the last century and, by association, what it means today. Is it any different? Australia is still under the sovereign rule of Britain, the Republic still not realized. Carey's focus on post-colonialism and the struggle for Australian identity has clarified with every novel he has written, and it has never been clearer than here. The past is not dead, but it continues. Australia is still not free today, just as it was not free in Kelly's time. The sense of injustice in this book, and in this situation is prevalent.
But do not think this an overly serious or difficult book, because Carey has always been a wonderful story-teller and entertainer. There is abundant action and humor in this novel, and it comes at a great pace. The description of the Australian outback is vivid and sensual, bringing to life the harsh beauty of the country, the loud blackness of the bush night, and the roaring life of rivers in flood. Even the explanations of Kelly's difficult situation are couched in native terms that ring with truth and beauty. For example, when Kelly confesses that he can't imagine the forces stirred against him, he describes himself as "a plump witchetty grub beneath the bark not knowing that the kookaburra exists unable to imagine that fierce beak or the punishment in that wild and angry eye." Throughout the telling the voice of Kelly is dominant, Carey disappearing masterfully behind his narrator. Detail is immaculately and consistently observed. Kelly is obsessed it seems with numbers, for example. He gives ages and dimensions meticulously. Also, and effectively given the violence of the story and the reputation of Kelly himself, there is a winning sense of decorum in Kelly's refusal to report strong language. Instead we get b----r, and b----y, and most notably the replacement of all other swear words with the cover-all term "adjectival." Each chapter is a "found" document, Kelly's writings being made on any available paper stock tell his story, and pulled together after his capture and execution. Kelly's civil disobedience, while often violent in nature, is grounded in an sense of moral injustice that breeds a sturdy stoicism. Kelly is the hero we identify with and the forces of imperialism and societal intolerance that we read of in this book are the historical factors that forced him into being, in all his conflicted fatalism. In the "true" history of the Kelly gang it is made clear that this past is not dead but still with us. If Carey's novel is particularly Australian, his theme is universal.
19 von 20 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
The Great Australian Novel. 26. Februar 2001
Von J. GRAHAM - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
This is one of the few great "factional" works of literature. Most attempts in making novels of real life people tend to fail. Exceptions are Mailer's The Executioner's Song and Capote's In Cold Blood. Along with Kelly the central characters of these stories met their fate in the same way - executed by the state. And now in Carey's True History of the Kelly Gang we learn of Ned's inevitable march to the gallows. Through these tales we may understand what motivates society's criminals. In bringing Ned back to life Peter Carey has done this brilliantly.
In the True History Carey has looked anew at a timeless story. One which is just as relevant today. How much is one's environment responsible for the illegal actions of an otherwise decent man. Yet, despite all his disadvantages, Ned Kelly emerges as a man of much depth, compassion and intelligence. Ned cared much for his fellow Irish-Australians and the other dispossessed choking under the English yoke in the colony of Victoria in the nineteenth century.
What'smore I loved how Carey has truly captured Ned's voice. A voice that shows a lack of education but a great depth of insight and understanding of his times. And what exciting times they were.
A great book by a writer who has now reached the height of his powers. If one wants to understand what, hopefully, lies at the heart of the Australian character then this is, as Ned's mother would say, the effing book.
43 von 52 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Over the fence 3. September 2001
Von peter wild - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
There is the short version and the long version.
The short version goes like this: if you are interested in Ned Kelly OR enjoyed either Roddy Doyle's "A Star Called Henry" or Russell Bank's "Cloudsplitter" (without knowing all that much about Irish or American history, respectively), you will like Peter Carey's "True History of the Kelly Gang".
The long version begins by taking both Roddy Doyle and Russell Banks to task, somewhat, suggesting that each of those novels uses history as a crutch: "A Star Called Henry" relies on a working knowledge of Irish history (particularly, "the troubles"); "Cloudsplitter" demands a similar expertise in regard to the American Civil War (and, furthermore, it helps - when reading "Cloudsplitter" - to have a definite opinion on John Brown).
All of which goes double for Peter Carey's book. This is a memoir (of sort) narrated by Ned Kelly, Australian outlaw cum folk hero. In lots of ways, an Australian John Brown. He tells you about his family (his wayward father, his struggling mother, his brothers and sisters). He tells you about his upbringing against a context of colonial misrule. He explains how the events that came about, came about, and tries to justify the actions against the historical perception. All very interesting up to a point.
BUT (and this is a collossal, fifty-foot high but): I couldn't help but be reminded of something a friend said to me recently. "Some books," my friend said, "you are INSIDE - it isn't like you're reading, it is like you're there. Some books, you enjoy less. You can APPRECIATE them, without quite being inside them. In other words, you can see why people like them, without quite getting worked up yourself. After that, what you're left with is books you just downright don't enjoy, for whatever reason - those are books that sit in your neighbour's garden, on the other side of the fence from you."
"True History of the Kelly Gang" starts out as a book you appreciate. Peter Carey is a writer's writer. You have a sly old chuckle at the great skill involved in constructing sentences that trail on and on, suggesting that (a) Ned Kelly is not a schooled man (b) Ned Kelly is not an ignorant man. This is what the construction of sentences alone suggests. There is an immediate duality at play. All credit to the author for that. It is all very clever.
However, over the course of the novel, it is that self-same erudition and skill that stops you, the reader, getting inside. This is not a book to enjoy. This is a book to occasionally marvel at. As with any marvel you are expected to stop and stare and coo and say aah at for any length of time, however, you eventually get tired. Your jaw aches from all that smiling. You start to get a bit tired of marvels. The books stops being a book you appreciate (roundabout the time Ned starts outlawing for real, when the book seems to become an endless round of police chasing outlaws, outlaws chasing police) and starts to be a book that annoys.
You sit there (scowling, in my case) as the book climbs up the fence and into your neighbour's garden. You keep checking how many pages you still have to read as the book lounges there on a towel, looking for all the world like the Cheshire Cat after a meal of cream. This is a book that reads like it is very pleased with itself, thankyou very much.
Which kind of puts me off somewhat.
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