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This Changes Everything: Capitalism vs. The Climate [Englisch] [Taschenbuch]

Naomi Klein
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Kurzbeschreibung

16. September 2014
The most important book yet from the author of the international bestseller The Shock Doctrine, a brilliant explanation of why the climate crisis challenges us to abandon the core “free market” ideology of our time, restructure the global economy, and remake our political systems.

In short, either we embrace radical change ourselves or radical changes will be visited upon our physical world. The status quo is no longer an option.

In This Changes Everything Naomi Klein argues that climate change isn’t just another issue to be neatly filed between taxes and health care. It’s an alarm that calls us to fix an economic system that is already failing us in many ways. Klein meticulously builds the case for how massively reducing our greenhouse emissions is our best chance to simultaneously reduce gaping inequalities, re-imagine our broken democracies, and rebuild our gutted local economies. She exposes the ideological desperation of the climate-change deniers, the messianic delusions of the would-be geoengineers, and the tragic defeatism of too many mainstream green initiatives. And she demonstrates precisely why the market has not—and cannot—fix the climate crisis but will instead make things worse, with ever more extreme and ecologically damaging extraction methods, accompanied by rampant disaster capitalism.

Klein argues that the changes to our relationship with nature and one another that are required to respond to the climate crisis humanely should not be viewed as grim penance, but rather as a kind of gift—a catalyst to transform broken economic and cultural priorities and to heal long-festering historical wounds. And she documents the inspiring movements that have already begun this process: communities that are not just refusing to be sites of further fossil fuel extraction but are building the next, regeneration-based economies right now.

Can we pull off these changes in time? Nothing is certain. Nothing except that climate change changes everything. And for a very brief time, the nature of that change is still up to us.

Wird oft zusammen gekauft

This Changes Everything: Capitalism vs. The Climate + The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism + No LOGO. 10th Anniversary Edition: No Space, No Choice, No Jobs
Preis für alle drei: EUR 36,55

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Produktinformation

  • Taschenbuch: 576 Seiten
  • Verlag: Simon & Schuster; Auflage: Export (16. September 2014)
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ISBN-10: 1476791147
  • ISBN-13: 978-1476791142
  • Größe und/oder Gewicht: 22,8 x 15 x 2,8 cm
  • Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung: 5.0 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (3 Kundenrezensionen)
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: Nr. 543 in Fremdsprachige Bücher (Siehe Top 100 in Fremdsprachige Bücher)

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Produktbeschreibungen

Pressestimmen

“This may be the first truly honest book ever written about climate change.” (Bryan Walsh Time)

"This is the best book about climate change in a very long time—in large part because it's about much more. It sets the most important crisis in human history in the context of our other ongoing traumas, reminding us just how much the powers-that-be depend on the power of coal, gas and oil. And that in turn should give us hope, because it means the fight for a just world is the same as the fight for a livable one." (Bill McKibben, author of The End of Nature and co-founder of 350.org)

This Changes Everything is the work book for . . . [a] new, more assertive, more powerful environmental movement.” (Mark Bittman)

"Naomi Klein applies her fine, fierce, and meticulous mind to the greatest, most urgent questions of our times. . . . I count her among the most inspirational political thinkers in the world today." (Arundhati Roy, author of The God of Small Things and Capitalism: A Ghost Story)

“Naomi Klein is a genius. She has done for politics what Jared Diamond did for the study of human history. She skillfully blends politics, economics and history and distills out simple and powerful truths with universal applicability.” (Robert F. Kennedy, Jr.)

“[A]robust new polemic. . . . Drawing on an impressive volume of research, Ms. Klein savages the idea that we will be saved by new technologies or by an incremental shift away from fossil fuels: Both approaches, she argues, are forms of denial. . . . Ms. Klein is aware of the intractability of the problems she describes, but she manages optimism nonetheless.” (Nathaniel Rich The New York Times)

"Klein is a brave and passionate writer who always deserves to be heard, and this is a powerful and urgent book." (John Gray The Observer (UK))

“If global warming is a worldwide wake-up call, we’re all pretty heavy sleepers. . . . We haven't made significant progress, Klein argues, because we've been expecting solutions from the very same institutions that created the problem in the first place. . . . Klein's sharp analysis makes a compelling case that a mass awakening is part of the answer.” (Chris Bentley The Chicago Tribune)

“Gripping and dramatic. . . . [Klein] writes of a decisive battle for the fate of the earth in which we either take back control of the planet from the capitalists who are destroying it or watch it all burn.” (Roy Scranton Rolling Stone)

“Naomi Klein’s latest book may be the manifesto that the climate movement — and the planet — needs right now. . . . For those with whom her message does resonate — and they are likely to be legion — her book could help catalyze the kind of mass movement she argues the world needs now.” (Mason Inman San Francisco Chronicle)

“Powerfully and uncompromisingly written, the impassioned polemic we have come to expect from Klein, mixing first-hand accounts of events around the world and withering political analysis. . . . Her stirring vision is nothing less than a political, economic, social, cultural and moral make-over of the human world.” (Mike Hulme New Scientist)

“A powerful, profound, and compelling book.” (Matthew Rothschild The Progressive)

“Klein is one of the left’s most influential figures and a prominent climate champion. . . . [She] is a gifted writer and there is little doubt about the problem she identifies.” (Pilita Clark The Financial Times)

“Whatever side you take, Klein deserves credit for not sugarcoating the problem. She writes that limiting global warming won't be quick, easy or without disruptions, yet holds out hope that the end result will be better for people, the environment and even the economy. . . . This Changes Everything may motivate more people to think and act on climate change, and that’s good.” (Associated Press)

“Journalist Klein is a resolute investigator into the dark side of unchecked capitalism. . . . This comprehensive, sure-to-be controversial inquiry, one of the most thorough, eloquent, and enlightening books yet on this urgent and overwhelming subject—alongside works by Bill McKibben, Elizabeth Kolbert, and Diane Ackerman—provides the evidence and the reasoning we need to help us shift to a ‘worldview based on regeneration and renewal rather than domination and depletion.’” (Booklist (starred review))

"[Klein's] journalism won't slow down the fossil fuel companies, but it surely holds out hope for activists looking to avert a disaster. . . . A sharp analysis that is bound to be widely discussed." (Kirkus Reviews)

"The book has an uplifting message: that humans have changed before, and can change again. It poses a gutsy challenge to those who are vaguely hoping that the whole issue will go away, or that some new technology will save us." (Camilla Cavendish The Sunday Times (UK)) -- Dieser Text bezieht sich auf eine andere Ausgabe: Gebundene Ausgabe .

Über den Autor und weitere Mitwirkende

Naomi Klein is an award-winning journalist, syndicated columnist, and author of the New York Times and #1 international bestseller The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism. Her first book, No Logo: Taking Aim at the Brand Bullies, was also an international bestseller. Klein is a contributing editor for Harper’s and reporter for Rolling Stone and writes a syndicated column for The Nation and the Guardian. She lives in Toronto.

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Die Spezialisierung von Technik, Wissenschaft und vielleicht auch die Politik ist ein grosses Problem der heutigen Welt. Dies führt dazu, dass wenig Menschen in der Lage sind, Fachübergreifend zu denken um Lösungen der grossen Probleme unserer Zeit zu finden. Der General sieht immer die Lösung in mehr Bomben, der Atomlobbyist in mehr Atomkraftwerken, der Windturbinenhersteller in mehr Windturbinen und der Bankier in Wachstum und BIP. „If all you got is a hammer, every problem looks like a nail“.

Naomi Klein ist ein sehr intelligenter Mensch und hat eine unglaubliche Fähigkeit, die grossen Zusammenhänge zu sehen und Probleme bei Namen zu nennen. Sie analysiert Politik, Wirtschaft und Wissenschaft um die Grundproblematik der Klimakrise zu finden: So lange wir Wohlstand mit wachsendem materiellem Konsum gleichsetzen, werden wir keine Chance haben, die Klimaerwärmung zu stoppen. In diesem Sinne gibt es einen Konflikt zwischen den Naturgesetzen und den Gesetzen der Wirtschaft. Leider können wir die Gesetze der Natur nicht verändern.

Das Buch ist unglaublich wichtig und sollte von jedem Erdbewohner gelesen werden.

Mehr dazu hier: [...]
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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Format:Taschenbuch
‘This Changes Everything’ written by always interesting, and usually equally controversial author Naomi Klein is story which speaks of times ahead of us, seen through the consequences of unrestrained and only profit driven capitalism.

Though reader may agree more or less with her views, undoubtedly with her book she managed to tackle all the challenges facing humanity if we want to progress. Or simply survive.

Klein shows how profitable is denying of climate changes, but the question remains for how long we will be able to wait, until we get to the point of no return. She proves how uncompromising race for money threatens the very foundation of nature, our environment whose integral and indispensable part is human race.

She invites her readers not to wait anymore because very soon it would be too late and the collapse of our civilization will become inevitable, or as she said – “…society has no choice but to take dramatic action to avert a collapse of civilization. Either we will change our ways and build an entirely new kind of global society, or they will be changed for us.” And whatever you think about capitalism or the author I believe you will agree that the topic she is talking about is too important to be left to someone else - it is something that concerns all of us.

In her book, Klein is not just criticizing - she provides many solutions (solar, wind and renewal energy in general), shows examples of things managed to be done differently, but also debunks some myths that are often accidentally or intentionally used in the media as a means of environmental protection such as natural gas which is even more dangerous to environment than coal.
Lesen Sie weiter... ›
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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Great book 6. Oktober 2014
Format:Kindle Edition|Verifizierter Kauf
Passionate, deeply researched and very informative, not on the science of climate change itself, there are enough good books on that, but on what is or is not going on to combat it. You meet the heroes and the villains and the villains dressed as heroes. If you haven't joined the battle yet , this book will will make you rush to enlist.
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4.0 von 5 Sternen A Resounding Call-to-Arms 21. September 2014
Von Chris Ziesler - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition|Verifizierter Kauf
This Changes Everything belongs to the noble tradition of investigative, crusading journalism championed by the likes of Ida Tarbell, Upton Sinclair, Rachel Carson and John Pilger. It is a meticulously researched and passionately argued exposé and a call to arms.

Klein spells out in detail the work of the cabal of corporately-funded propaganda houses such as the Heartland and Cato Institutes, and the Heritage Foundation in undermining climate science and subverting what was once a bi-partisan approach to dealing Climate Change. She gives an extended account of the methods and agendas of these groups and provides good insight into their motivations and the reasons for their success in altering public opinion on Climate Change in the last ten years.

The strength of this crusading journalism approach is its passion and sense of outrage, the weakness is that it portrays the world as a simplified battle between good guys and bad guys. The bad guys in the this story are the greedy fossil fuel corporations, the extractive coal and oil companies, the white, middle class, right-wing men who are thoroughly invested in the system as it stands. The good guys are the poor and dispossessed of the Earth, the Indigenous Peoples fighting for their rights, the local communities who want to do the right thing if only the political and business elites would allow them to live in harmony with the Earth.

The problem with this world view is that while it may be emotionally plausible is it too simplistic. As I can personally attest from my six years working for Shell Wind there are plenty of caring, environmentally committed people working for oil companies, and there are plenty of selfish and greedy people among the supposed "good guys". The world is a more interesting, diverse and challenging place that Klein would have us believe.

The other major weakness of the book is the vision of how this Climate Crisis might be dealt with? Klein's view is that only a major bottom-up revolution of attitudes and behavior will stand any chance of making a significant difference. She draws parallels with the abolition of slavery, the end of colonialism, and the Civil Rights Movement in the US. All of these bottom-up movements for societal change had inspirational and charismatic leaders, clear goals and a well-defined program of what needed to be done to achieve them. At the moment this is just not true of the Climate Action movement.

Klein may very well be correct in her analysis that the Climate Crisis needs a movement as profound as these, but the examples of Climate Activism she cites seem to be pale imitators of these profound movements towards social justice. She also misses the point that one of the biggest challenges with trying to convince ordinary people of the urgency of the problem is that it seems too vague, diffuse and insubstantial and with only a peripheral impact on their everyday lives.

I applaud this book for arguing powerfully the case for immediate and urgent Climate Action now. I worry that the suggested path towards a solution is too Utopian and lacking in real political bite and feasibility.
120 von 148 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Climate Change 16. September 2014
Von Geoff Martin - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe
This is a comprehensive and compelling work dealing with the ramifications of unchecked global warming due to ever increasing carbon emissions and greenhouse gases.

Ms. Klein provides a passionately cogent analysis of our present ineffectiveness of dealing with the situation. Although a liberal, she highlights the failures of environmental organizations as well as excorciating the vested interests involved with fracking, tar sands extraction, and deep water drilling.

The paramount point she makes is that capitalism is unable to effect climate change due to its dependence on fossil fuels and need for continuous growth. And the time for marginal fixes has expired, thus forcing us to now make radical changes in how we live. Ms. Klein suggests that only national and international consensus, regulation, and planning (on a par with the U.S. and Britain's concerted WWII planning efforts) have any chance at making unified reductions in emissions to bring climate change under control.

Economists (both liberal and conservative) know there are certain places where free markets don't work well... those concerning certain `public goods' (highways, traffic lights, etc.) The future of our planet's ecosphere is probably the most paramount `public good' of all. Combatting carbon emissions to reduce global warming transcends ideology. It doesn't matter whether you are a socialist, capitalist, conservative, or liberal... if we do not have a liveable, breathable planet in the future, no one will be left to practice his or her beliefs.

I believe there is no liberal-only choir Ms. Klein is preaching to in this volume. Instead, it is a choir called humanity. The author has made a valiant and commendable attempt at understanding this complex subject. This is an important issue and an important book. If this volume merely starts some debates, and moves others further along, it will have been worth the effort.
32 von 38 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Timely discussion of our biggest challenge and how the economic system is to blame 24. September 2014
Von Erik Olsen - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe|Verifizierter Kauf
A timely discussion about the reasons for why humanity is failing to address climate-change: our current capitalist economic system. I particularly find her analysis of how the "Right is right" enlightening, because rather that dismissing conservative, capitalist climate-change deniers as stupid Klein analyzes the reason for their denial, and finds it rest in how climate change and how to deal effectively with it are not in any way in agreement with the free-market Friedman/Rand politics the right has fought hard for over the years.

She is a bit overly bleak in her outlook on the future though - especially in regards to technological solutions, but her overall message, that the economic system needs reform (revolution?) in order for us to tackle climate change is presented in a comprehensive manner. The length is right - our biggest challenge as a planet and as a species deserves the detail and extended discussion that Klein presents.

Klein writes well -the pages fly, but the subject is so depressing that it keeps you awake, so I wouldn't recommend it for bedside reading.

This is however not a book for anybody skeptical of climate-change. Klein assumes that the reader is able to approach the subject intellectually and understand the basic science and does not try to deny basic facts of climate research (e.g. melting of ice-sheets, long-term climate record).
13 von 14 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen Overlooks the Obvious 18. Oktober 2014
Von Ntropee - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe|Verifizierter Kauf
First off, this is an inspiring book. Klein has helped her readers better understand the germination of a broad based, multi-dimensional climate movement from the ground up and its potential to galvanize and revitalize the Left. Also, she's shown the courage to name the source of the problem--capitalism--when so many liberals shrink from mentioning the "c" word. In addition, her focus on the fossil fuel industry as the strategic target of the movement clearly highlights the importance of isolating one of the most malignant sectors of industrial capitalism.

But despite her insightful and inspirational treatment of the climate movement's potential to change everything, I believe Klein over-states her case and overlooks crucial features of the dangerously dysfunctional system we're up against. By putting climate change on a pedestal, she limits our understanding of how to break capitalism's death grip over our lives and our future.

For instance, Klein ignores the deep connection between climate chaos, militarism, and war. While she spends an entire chapter explaining why Virgin Airlines owner, Richard Branson, and other Green billionaires won't save us, she devotes three meager sentences to the most violent, wasteful, petroleum-burning institution on Earth--the US military. Klein shares this blind spot with the United Nations' official climate forum. The UNFCCC excludes most of the military sector's fuel consumption and emissions from national greenhouse gas inventories. This exemption was the product of intense lobbying by the United States during the Kyoto negotiations in the mid-1990s. Ever since, the military establishment's carbon "bootprint" has been officially ignored. Klein's book lost an important opportunity to expose this insidious cover-up.

The Pentagon is not only the largest institutional burner of fossil fuels on the planet; it is also the top arms exporter and military spender. America's global military empire guards Big Oil's refineries, pipelines, and supertankers. It props up the most reactionary petro-tyrannies; devours enormous quantities of oil to fuel its war machine; and spews more dangerous toxins into the environment than any corporate polluter. The military, weapons producers, and the petroleum industry have a long history of corrupt collaboration. This odious relationship stands out in bold relief in the Middle East where Washington arms the region's repressive regimes with the latest weaponry and imposes a phalanx of bases where American soldiers, mercenaries, and drones are deployed to guard the pumps, refineries, and supply lines of Exxon-Mobil, BP, and Chevron.

The petro-military complex is the most costly, destructive, anti-democratic sector of the corporate state. It wields tremendous power over Washington and both political parties. Any movement to counteract climate chaos, transform our energy future, and strengthen grassroots democracy cannot ignore America's petro-empire. Yet oddly enough when Klein looks for ways to finance the transition to a renewable energy infrastructure in the US, the bloated military budget is not considered.

The Pentagon itself openly recognizes the connection between climate change and war. In June, a US Military Advisory Board's report on National Security and the Accelerating Risks of Climate Change warned that "...the projected impacts of climate change will be more than threat multipliers; they will serve as catalysts for instability and conflict." In response, the Pentagon is gearing up to fight "climate wars" over resources threatened by atmospheric disruption, like fresh water, arable land, and food.

Klein says she thinks climate change has a unique galvanizing potential because it presents humanity with an "existential crisis." She sets out to show how it can change everything by weaving "all of these seemingly disparate issues into a coherent narrative about how to protect humanity from the ravages of a savagely unjust economic system and a destabilized climate system." But then her narrative ignores militarism almost entirely. Can any progressive movement protect the planet without connecting the dots between climate chaos and war or confronting this petro-military empire head on? If the US and other governments go to war over the planet's shrinking reserves of energy and other resources, should we keep our focus locked on climate change, or should resisting resource wars become our most immediate concern?

Another important blind spot in Klein's book is the issue of "peak oil." This is the point when the rate of petroleum extraction has maxed out and begins to terminally decline. By now it's become widely accepted that global CONVENTIONAL oil production peaked around 2005. Many believe this produced the high oil prices that triggered the 2008 recession and instigated the latest drive to extract expensive, dirty unconventional shale oil and tar sands once the price point finally made them profitable.

Although some of this extraction is a heavily subsidized, financially speculative bubble that may soon prove over-inflated, the temporary influx of unconventional hydrocarbons has given the economy a brief respite from recession. However, conventional oil production is predicted to drop by over 50 percent in the next two decades while unconventional sources are unlikely to replace any more than 6 percent. So the global economic breakdown may soon return with a vengeance.

The peak oil predicament raises important movement-building issues for climate activists and all progressives. Klein may have avoided this issue because some folks in the peak oil crowd downplay the need for a powerful climate movement. Not that they think climate disruption isn't a serious problem, but because they believe we are nearing a global industrial collapse brought on by a sharp reduction in the net hydrocarbons available for economic growth. In their estimation, global fossil fuel supplies will drop dramatically relative to rising demand because society will require ever-increasing amounts of energy just to find and extract the remaining dirty, unconventional hydrocarbons.

Thus, even though there may still be enormous amounts of fossil energy underground, society will have to devote ever-greater portions of energy and capital just to get at it, leaving less and less for everything else. Peak oil theorists think this energy and capital drain will devastate the rest of the economy. They believe this looming breakdown may do far more to cut carbon emissions than any political movement. Are they right? Who knows? But even if they're wrong about total collapse, peak hydrocarbons are bound to trigger escalating recessions and accompanying drops in carbon emissions. What will this mean for the climate movement and its galvanizing impact on the Left?

Klein herself acknowledges that, so far, the biggest reductions in GHG emissions have come from economic recessions, not political action. But she avoids the deeper question this raises: if capitalism lacks the abundant, cheap energy needed to sustain growth, how will the climate movement respond when stagnation, recession, and depression become the new normal and carbon emissions begin falling as a result?

Klein sees capitalism as a relentless growth machine wreaking havoc with the planet. But capitalism's prime directive is profit, not growth. If growth turns to contraction and collapse, capitalism won't evaporate. Capitalist elites will extract profits from hoarding, corruption, crisis, and conflict. In a growth-less economy, the profit motive can have a devastating catabolic impact on society. The word "catabolism" comes from the Greek and is used in biology to refer to the condition whereby a living thing feeds on itself. Catabolic capitalism is a self-cannibalizing economic system. Unless we free ourselves from its grip, catabolic capitalism becomes our future.

Capitalism's catabolic implosion raises important predicaments that climate activists and the Left must consider. Instead of relentless growth, what if the future becomes a series of energy-induced economic breakdowns--a bumpy, uneven, stair-step tumble off the peak oil plateau? How will a climate movement respond if credit freezes, financial assets vaporize, currency values fluctuate wildly, trade shuts down, and governments impose draconian measures to maintain their authority? If Americans can't find food in the supermarkets, money in the ATMs, gas in the pumps, and electricity in the power lines, will climate be their central concern?

Global economic seizures and contractions would radically reduce hydrocarbon use, causing energy prices to tumble temporarily. In the midst of deep recession and dramatic reductions in carbon emissions would climate chaos remain a central public concern and a galvanizing issue for the Left? If not, how would a progressive movement centered on climate change maintain its momentum? Will the public be receptive to calls for curbing carbon emissions to save the climate if burning cheaper hydrocarbons seems like the fastest way to kick start growth, no matter how temporary?

Under this likely scenario, the climate movement could collapse faster than the economy. A depression-induced reduction in GHGs would be a great thing for the climate, but it would suck for the climate movement because people will see little reason to concern themselves with cutting carbon emissions. In the midst of depression and falling carbon emissions, people and governments will be far more worried about economic recovery. Under these conditions, the movement will only survive if it transfers its focus from climate change to building a stable, sustainable recovery free from addiction to vanishing reserves of fossil fuels.

If green community organizers and social movements initiate nonprofit forms of socially responsible banking, production, and exchange that help people survive systemic breakdowns, they will earn valuable public approval and respect. If they help organize community farms, kitchens, health clinics and neighborhood security, they will gain further cooperation and support. And if they can rally people to protect their savings and pensions and prevent foreclosures, evictions, layoffs, and workplace shutdowns, then popular resistance to catabolic capitalism will grow dramatically. To nurture the transition toward a thriving, just, ecologically stable society, all of these struggles must be interwoven and infused with an inspirational vision of how much better life could be if we freed ourselves from this dysfunctional, profit-obsessed, petroleum-addicted system once and for all.

The lesson that Naomi Klein overlooks seems clear. Climate chaos is just one DEVASTATING symptom of our dysfunctional society. To survive catabolic capitalism and germinate an alternative, movement activists will have to anticipate and help people respond to multiple crises while organizing them to recognize and root out their source. If the movement lacks the foresight to anticipate these cascading calamities and change its focus when needed, we will have squandered a vital lesson from Klein's previous book, The Shock Doctrine. Unless the Left is capable of envisioning and advancing a better alternative, the power elite will use each new crisis to ram through their agenda of "drilling and killing" while society is reeling and traumatized. If the Left cannot build a movement strong enough and flexible enough to resist the ecological, economic, and military emergencies of declining industrial civilization and begin generating hopeful alternatives it will quickly lose momentum to those who profit from disaster.
15 von 17 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Topic that concerns all of us to become aware of where our world is heading 18. September 2014
Von Denis Vukosav - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe
‘This Changes Everything’ written by always interesting, and usually equally controversial author Naomi Klein is story which speaks of times ahead of us, seen through the consequences of unrestrained and only profit driven capitalism.

Though reader may agree more or less with her views, undoubtedly with her book she managed to tackle all the challenges facing humanity if we want to progress. Or simply survive.

Klein shows how profitable is denying of climate changes, but the question remains for how long we will be able to wait, until we get to the point of no return. She proves how uncompromising race for money threatens the very foundation of nature, our environment whose integral and indispensable part is human race.

She invites her readers not to wait anymore because very soon it would be too late and the collapse of our civilization will become inevitable, or as she said – “…society has no choice but to take dramatic action to avert a collapse of civilization. Either we will change our ways and build an entirely new kind of global society, or they will be changed for us.” And whatever you think about capitalism or the author I believe you will agree that the topic she is talking about is too important to be left to someone else - it is something that concerns all of us.

In her book, Klein is not just criticizing - she provides many solutions (solar, wind and renewal energy in general), shows examples of things managed to be done differently, but also debunks some myths that are often accidentally or intentionally used in the media as a means of environmental protection such as natural gas which is even more dangerous to environment than coal.

Overall, ‘This Changes Everything’ is book which will not by itself change anything overnight, but it will certainly make think more people to become aware of where our world is going, and that this is the one-way street with catastrophic consequences if we do not act quickly. Therefore Naomi Klein is work that can be highly recommended as something that will help us start paying attention to what is truly important and begin to act, as much as anyone is able to.
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