EUR 14,90
  • Unverb. Preisempf.: EUR 15,99
  • Sie sparen: EUR 1,09 (7%)
  • Alle Preisangaben inkl. MwSt.
kostenlose Lieferung. Siehe Details.
Auf Lager.
Verkauf und Versand durch Amazon.
Geschenkverpackung verfügbar.
Menge:1
In den Einkaufswagen
Ihren Artikel jetzt
eintauschen und
EUR 1,10 Gutschein erhalten.
Möchten Sie verkaufen?
Zur Rückseite klappen Zur Vorderseite klappen
Anhören Wird wiedergegeben... Angehalten   Sie hören eine Probe der Audible-Audioausgabe.
Weitere Informationen
Alle 2 Bilder anzeigen

Things That Make Us Smart: Defending Human Attributes in the Age of the Machine (William Patrick Book) (Englisch) Taschenbuch – 31. März 1994


Alle 3 Formate und Ausgaben anzeigen Andere Formate und Ausgaben ausblenden
Amazon-Preis Neu ab Gebraucht ab
Taschenbuch
"Bitte wiederholen"
EUR 14,90
EUR 10,64 EUR 3,96

Hinweise und Aktionen

  • Studienbücher: Ob neu oder gebraucht, alle wichtigen Bücher für Ihr Studium finden Sie im großen Studium Special. Natürlich portofrei.

  • Amazon Trade-In: Tauschen Sie Ihre gebrauchten Bücher gegen einen Amazon.de Gutschein ein - wir übernehmen die Versandkosten. Jetzt eintauschen


Wird oft zusammen gekauft

Things That Make Us Smart: Defending Human Attributes in the Age of the Machine (William Patrick Book) + Design of Everyday Things + Emotional Design: Why We Love (or Hate) Everyday Things
Preis für alle drei: EUR 45,97

Die ausgewählten Artikel zusammen kaufen

Kunden, die diesen Artikel gekauft haben, kauften auch

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Produktinformation

  • Taschenbuch: 304 Seiten
  • Verlag: Basic Books; Auflage: Revised. (31. März 1994)
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ISBN-10: 0201626950
  • ISBN-13: 978-0201626957
  • Größe und/oder Gewicht: 23,2 x 15,5 x 2,1 cm
  • Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung: 4.4 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (8 Kundenrezensionen)
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: Nr. 215.204 in Fremdsprachige Bücher (Siehe Top 100 in Fremdsprachige Bücher)
  • Komplettes Inhaltsverzeichnis ansehen

Mehr über den Autor

Entdecken Sie Bücher, lesen Sie über Autoren und mehr


Welche anderen Artikel kaufen Kunden, nachdem sie diesen Artikel angesehen haben?


In diesem Buch (Mehr dazu)
Einleitungssatz
THE GOOD NEWS IS THAT TECHNOLOGY CAN MAKE US SMART. Lesen Sie die erste Seite
Mehr entdecken
Wortanzeiger
Ausgewählte Seiten ansehen
Buchdeckel | Copyright | Inhaltsverzeichnis | Auszug | Stichwortverzeichnis | Rückseite
Hier reinlesen und suchen:

Kundenrezensionen

4.4 von 5 Sternen
Sagen Sie Ihre Meinung zu diesem Artikel

Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen

3 von 3 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von Rasmus on 11. Juni 2000
Format: Taschenbuch
This book is easy to read - and should open most peoples eyes a bit more...
It describes how we (mankind) uses external representations to assist our brains - from writing, to diagrams, to maps, to the way we build our offices.
If you want a deeper psychological understanding with which you can do your own reasoning on different types of external representation - get this book. If you want clear-cut guidelines - get another book.
If you like this book - try Normans: The Design of Everydaythings as well. You might like Donald Schöns The Reflective Practitioner also.
Last word: Norman seems to prefer easy reading to structure - which means the book is best read end-to-end.
Kommentar War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein Feedback senden...
Vielen Dank für Ihr Feedback. Wenn diese Rezension unangemessen ist, informieren Sie uns bitte darüber.
Wir konnten Ihre Stimmabgabe leider nicht speichern. Bitte erneut versuchen
2 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von boyce@persimmon.com on 21. Dezember 1998
Format: Taschenbuch
I have to preface this review by saying that I'm probably a tough audience for this sort of book -- I have a PhD in cognitive psych, and I work as a research scientist with a specialist in interface designs. With that caveat, I have to say that the book was very readable and enjoyable, but I was constantly wondering "Where's the Beef?"
Much of the research he reviewed was rather old, even at the time of publication, and most of the analysis of them elaborated too much, without really being that trenchant. I found myself skipping ahead about halfway through the book when I knew the point of a chapter after a page or two, and didn't find any surprises along the way.
A good "gee-whiz" book for those new to cognitive psych or human factors, but a bit of a let-down for the specialist.
Kommentar War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein Feedback senden...
Vielen Dank für Ihr Feedback. Wenn diese Rezension unangemessen ist, informieren Sie uns bitte darüber.
Wir konnten Ihre Stimmabgabe leider nicht speichern. Bitte erneut versuchen
1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von "sperloff" on 28. März 2000
Format: Taschenbuch
In this book, Donald Norman offers a thoughtful examination of the tools, toys and games that we interact with every day. According to Norman these "things that make us smart can also make us dumb." It is the way that we use and interact with these "things" that will determine their effect on our intelligence. Not only does this text offer a comprehensive history of technology tools, but it also examines the evolution of human thought and cognition.
Like Alan Cooper, Norman examines "what is wrong in the design of the technology that requires people to behave in machine-centered ways for which people are not well suited." Norman, however, does not concentrate on the negatives of software design. He presents a look at how we have evolved into our current state in order to make predictions and recommendations about how to proceed into the future.
Norman's study of experiential and reflective cognition should be required reading for any teacher. The study could help both new and veteran users of educational technologies make appropriate choices for the use of different software for different learning opportunities. The section on "optimal flow" is useful for educators, software or game designers and cognitive scientists. Doesn't everybody strive for a "continual flow of focused concentration?"
In his study of the human mind and distributed cognition, Norman examines some of the differences between humans and other species. One of the key distinctions for me was that humans can create tools to help them "overcome the limitations of brainpower." This is where he makes the connection to how things can make us smart. The philosophical nature of this section of the book was very interesting and useful for me.
Lesen Sie weiter... ›
Kommentar War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein Feedback senden...
Vielen Dank für Ihr Feedback. Wenn diese Rezension unangemessen ist, informieren Sie uns bitte darüber.
Wir konnten Ihre Stimmabgabe leider nicht speichern. Bitte erneut versuchen
Format: Taschenbuch
Technology can make us smart. Or stupid. It can liberate. Or enslave. Norman joins a select group of thinkers advocating a human-centered approach to technology. Inspired (or, more accurately, depressed) by Jerry Mander, he wrote this book to examine the differences between humans and machines, and to establish some ground rules for policy that protected the one and leveraged the other. Norman notes that when technology is not designed from a human-centered point of view, it produces accidents and more often than not the human is blamed. He focuses especially on the distinction between experiential cognition and reflective cognition, and laments that television and entertainment are swamping us with the experiential and not teaching us the reflective. He is concerned that our ever-lengthening chain of technology dependence is forcing us to deal with ever-increasing loads of information at the same time that it weakens our inherent capabilities further. People first, science second, technology as servant.
Kommentar War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein Feedback senden...
Vielen Dank für Ihr Feedback. Wenn diese Rezension unangemessen ist, informieren Sie uns bitte darüber.
Wir konnten Ihre Stimmabgabe leider nicht speichern. Bitte erneut versuchen