The White Tiger: A Novel und über 1,5 Millionen weitere Bücher verfügbar für Amazon Kindle. Erfahren Sie mehr
EUR 6,10
  • Alle Preisangaben inkl. MwSt.
Auf Lager.
Verkauf und Versand durch Amazon.
Geschenkverpackung verfügbar.
Menge:1
Ihren Artikel jetzt
eintauschen und
EUR 0,55 Gutschein erhalten.
Möchten Sie verkaufen?
Zur Rückseite klappen Zur Vorderseite klappen
Anhören Wird wiedergegeben... Angehalten   Sie hören eine Probe der Audible-Audioausgabe.
Weitere Informationen
Dieses Bild anzeigen

The White Tiger: A Novel (Englisch) Taschenbuch – 11. November 2008


Alle 24 Formate und Ausgaben anzeigen Andere Formate und Ausgaben ausblenden
Amazon-Preis Neu ab Gebraucht ab
Kindle Edition
"Bitte wiederholen"
Taschenbuch
"Bitte wiederholen"
EUR 6,10
EUR 3,42 EUR 2,45
67 neu ab EUR 3,42 12 gebraucht ab EUR 2,45

Wird oft zusammen gekauft

The White Tiger: A Novel + The God of Small Things
Preis für beide: EUR 13,50

Die ausgewählten Artikel zusammen kaufen
Jeder kann Kindle Bücher lesen — selbst ohne ein Kindle-Gerät — mit der KOSTENFREIEN Kindle App für Smartphones, Tablets und Computer.


Produktinformation

  • Taschenbuch: 304 Seiten
  • Verlag: Free Press; Auflage: Export (11. November 2008)
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ISBN-10: 1439137692
  • ISBN-13: 978-1439137697
  • Größe und/oder Gewicht: 10,6 x 2,2 x 17,4 cm
  • Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung: 4.6 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (58 Kundenrezensionen)
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: Nr. 9.280 in Fremdsprachige Bücher (Siehe Top 100 in Fremdsprachige Bücher)

Mehr über den Autor

Entdecken Sie Bücher, lesen Sie über Autoren und mehr

Produktbeschreibungen

Amazon.de

Winning the Man Booker prize is something that most authors dream of, although -- ironically -- the reputation of the prize itself was under siege a few years ago. Books that won the award were acquiring a reputation of being difficult and inaccessible, but those days appear to be over -- and unarguable proof may be found in the 2008 winner, The White Tiger by Aravind Adiga. Apart from its considerable literary merit, the novel is the most compelling of pageturners (in the old-fashioned sense of that phrase) and offers a picture of modern India that is as evocative as it is unflattering. The protagonist, too, is drawn in the most masterly of fashion.

Balram Halwai, the eponymous ‘white tiger’, is a diminutive, overweight ex-teashop worker who now earns his living as a chauffeur. But this is only one side of his protean personality; he deals in confidence scams, over-ambitious business promotions (built on the shakiest of foundations) and enjoys approaching life with a philosophical turn of mind. But is Balram also a murderer? We learn the answer as we devour these 500 odd pages. Born into an impoverished family, Balram is removed from school by his parents in order to earn money in a thankless job: shop employee. He is forced into banal, mind-numbing work. But Balram dreams of escaping -- and a chance arises when a well-heeled village landlord takes him on as a chauffeur for his son (although the duties involve transporting the latter's wife and two Pomeranian dogs). From the rich new perspective offered to him in this more interesting job, Balram discovers New Delhi, and a vision of the city changes his life forever. His learning curve is very steep, and he quickly comes to believe that the way to the top is by the most expedient means. And if that involves committing the odd crime of violence, he persuades himself that this is what successful people must do.

The story of the amoral protagonist at the centre of this fascinating narrative is, of course, what keeps the reader comprehensively gripped, but perhaps the real achievement of the book is in its picture of two Indias: the bleak, soul-destroying poverty of village life and the glittering prizes to be found in the big city. The book cleverly avoids fulfilling any of the expectations a potential reader might have -- except that of instructing and entertaining. The White Tiger will have many readers anxious to see what Adiga will do next. --Barry Forshaw -- Dieser Text bezieht sich auf eine vergriffene oder nicht verfügbare Ausgabe dieses Titels.

Pressestimmen

"Compelling, angry, and darkly humorous, The White Tiger is an unexpected journey into a new India. Aravind Adiga is a talent to watch." -- Mohsin Hamid, author of The Reluctant Fundamentalist

"An exhilarating, side-splitting account of India today, as well as an eloquent howl at her many injustices. Adiga enters the literary scene resplendent in battle dress and ready to conquer. Let us bow to him." -- Gary Shteyngart, author of Absurdistan and The Russian Debutante's Handbook

"The perfect antidote to lyrical India." - Publishers Weekly

"This fast-moving novel, set in India, is being sold as a corrective to the glib, dreamy exoticism Western readers often get...If these are the hands that built India, their grandkids really are going to kick America's ass...BUY IT." - New York Magazine

"Darkly comic...Balram's appealingly sardonic voice and acute observations of the social order are both winning and unsettling." - The New Yorker

"Aravind Adiga's The White Tiger is one of the most powerful books I've read in decades. No hyperbole. This debut novel from an Indian journalist living in Mumbai hit me like a kick to the head -- the same effect Richard Wright's Native Son and Ralph Ellison's Invisible Man had. - USA Today

"This is the authentic voice of the Third World, like you've never heard it before. Adiga is a global Gorky, a modern Kipling who grew up, and grew up mad. The future of the novel lies here." - John Burdett, author of Bangkok 8

"Fierce and funny...A satire as sharp as it gets." - Michael Upchurch, The Seattle Times

"There is a new Muse stalking global narrative: brown, angry, hilarious, half-educated, rustic-urban, iconoclastic, paan-spitting, word-smithing--and in the case of Aravind Adiga she hails from a town called Laxmangarh. This is the authentic voice of the Third World, like you've never heard it before. Adiga is a global Gorky, a modern Kipling who grew up, and grew up mad. The future of the novel lies here." - John Burdett, author of Bangkok 8

"The White Tiger echoes masterpieces of resistance and oppression (both The Jungle and Native Son come to mind) [and] contains passages of startling beauty." - Lee Thomas, San Francisco Chronicle

Welche anderen Artikel kaufen Kunden, nachdem sie diesen Artikel angesehen haben?


In diesem Buch (Mehr dazu)
Nach einer anderen Ausgabe dieses Buches suchen.
Ausgewählte Seiten ansehen
Buchdeckel | Copyright | Auszug | Rückseite
Hier reinlesen und suchen:

Kundenrezensionen

4.6 von 5 Sternen
Sagen Sie Ihre Meinung zu diesem Artikel

Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen

32 von 33 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von Donald Mitchell TOP 500 REZENSENT am 8. Dezember 2008
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
Is this novel bitter, acid, sardonic, mocking, disillusioned, scornful, disrespectful, satirical, witty, or ironic? It displays, by turns, all of those qualities. The narrator's style perfectly captures the way that my Indian friends describe how government and personal privilege work in that country. While reading, I felt like I was sitting across from one of them having a cup of tea in a friendly Indian restaurant, and that reaction made me smile.

From this element, a false note creeps into this book. The people I know who express such views are highly educated Indians who have spent a lot of time outside of India. To make the book work, however, we have to believe that the writer is intelligent but has little education and experience outside of being a servant and driver.

Why did this debut novel win the prestigious Man Booker prize? I can only attribute the basis for that award to the obvious allusions to Crime and Punishment as Aravind Adiga explores how an impoverished Indian develops the consciousness to perform a great crime in a memoir-style novel filled with unrestrained humor. I've certainly read more humorous books by Indian authors in recent years.

As the book opens, we read a letter addressed "For the Desk of: His Excellency Wen Jiabao, The Premier's Office, Beijing, Capital of the Freedom-loving Nation of China From the Desk of: 'The White Tiger,' A Thinking Man, And an Entrepreneur, Living in the world's center of Technology and Outsourcing, Electronics City Phase I (just off Hosur Main Road, Bangalore, India." It begins, "Neither you nor I speak English, but there are some things that can be said only in English." The epistle is sent off in responses to the news that the premier is scheduled to arrive in Bangalore the following week.
Lesen Sie weiter... ›
Kommentar War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein Feedback senden...
Vielen Dank für Ihr Feedback. Wenn diese Rezension unangemessen ist, informieren Sie uns bitte darüber.
Wir konnten Ihre Stimmabgabe leider nicht speichern. Bitte erneut versuchen
14 von 14 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von Ingbert Edenhofer am 23. Februar 2009
Format: Taschenbuch
Okay, so this is maybe not necessarily where the future of the novel lies, as one of the reviews on the novel claims but it certainly is a very good book. Granted, I felt that the book did not get better while reading it - but this must be because it gets off to such an amazing start. This is one of the few books where I constantly had the urge to underline sentences. It's not so much the beauty of the language at it is its tone that really drew me in - to quote just one example: "Have you noticed that all four of the greatest poets in the world are Muslim? And yet all the Muslims you meet are illiterate or covered head to toe in black burkas or looking for buildings to blow up? It's a puzzle, isn't it? If you ever figure these people out, send me an e-mail."

There is so much more that this book has going for it. There is Balram Halwai, the protagonist who loves chandeliers and is afraid of nothing but lizards (what lovely details!). He is unscrupulous and absolutely pensive at the same time. This character is a true work of art. Also, the novel is very convincingly structured. There is a lot of foreshadowing employed, and expectations that are created are fulfilled eventually.

I am very much looking forward to reading his next novel. There is a tendency for debut novels not to be the best thing a writer produces so it is absolutely possible that Aravind Adiga will give the world outstanding novels. Let's hope so.
Kommentar War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein Feedback senden...
Vielen Dank für Ihr Feedback. Wenn diese Rezension unangemessen ist, informieren Sie uns bitte darüber.
Wir konnten Ihre Stimmabgabe leider nicht speichern. Bitte erneut versuchen
45 von 47 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von Michael Dienstbier TOP 500 REZENSENT am 7. November 2008
Format: Taschenbuch
Oh nein, nicht schon wieder so ein postkolonialer Roman, der der political correctness huldigt und seine Leser davon zu überzeugen versucht, dass Indien ja eigentlich doch viel besser ist als die korrupte westliche Welt. So dachte ich, als am 14. Oktober diesen Jahres Aravind Adigas Roman "The White Tiger" mit dem renommierten Booker Prize ausgezeichnet wurde. Dennoch habe ich mir den Roman zugelegt und erlebte eine große Überraschung. "The White Tiger" ist ein tiefschwarzer und brutal-zynischer Roman, der am Beispiel einer Person in einer so noch nie dagewesenen Offenheit einen Blick auf die korrumpierte Seele eines korrumpierten Landes wirft.

Ich-Erzähler des Romans ist Balram Halwai, der in einem Brief an den chinesischen Premierminister Wen Jiabao die Geschichte seines Aufstieges erzählt, die in einem Slum in der Nähe von Neu-Dheli begann und ihn bis an die Spitze der gesellschaftlichen Hierarchie führte. Und dabei wirft Balram einen schonungslosen Blick auf das Leben der zahlenmäßig gigantischen Unterschicht Indiens: "Things are different in the Darkness. There, every morning, tens of thousands of young men sit in the tea shop, reading the newspaper [...] or sit in their room talking to a photo of a film actress. They have no job to do today. They know they won't get any job today. They've given up the fight" (54).

Balram entkommt dem Elend seiner Familie, als der der Fahrer des erfolgreichen Geschäftsmannes Mr. Ashok wird. Nun erlebter hautnah die Spielregeln der Reichen und Mächtigen Indiens. Und da geht es ruppig zur Sache. Bestechung steht auf der Tagesordnung: "We're driving past Ghandi, after just having given a bribe to a minister. It's a fu----- joke, isn't it?
Lesen Sie weiter... ›
1 Kommentar War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein Feedback senden...
Vielen Dank für Ihr Feedback. Wenn diese Rezension unangemessen ist, informieren Sie uns bitte darüber.
Wir konnten Ihre Stimmabgabe leider nicht speichern. Bitte erneut versuchen
25 von 27 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von Wellness_HH am 23. Juli 2009
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
Ich habe dieses Buch im englischen Original gelesen - in Indien. Ich habe dort mehrere Jahre meines Lebens verbracht, kenne Indien also nicht nur als Tourist sondern auch in seiner Tiefe.

Es ist wunderbar das nun (2008) endlich mehrere Werke (dazu zähle ich auch "Slumdog Millionär") Aufmerksamkeit auf ein Indien abseits von Bollywood und Yoga-Ashrams lenkten. Den tatsächlich machen die wenigsten Inder Yoga und Bollywood versucht auch nur den schöne Schein zu bewahren.

Diese rasant geschriebene Geschichte beschreibt praktisch das moderne Märchen vom Tellerwäscher (Chai-Verkäufer) zum Millionär - allerdings unter indischen Gesetzmässigkeiten.

Mit all der in diesem Land herrschenden Korruption, keinen tut etwas ohne Bakschish, ungesühnte Kriminalität und dem Streben nach Macht, Macht und nochmals Macht. Denn Macht bedeutet in Indien Ansehen.
Und Ansehen ist hier alles, egal was die Leute hinter deinem Rücken reden.

Insofern verwundert es mich ein wenig, wenn die Leute das Buch als "herrlich ironisch" bewerten....äh, also...das ist alles Realität in diesem Land und keinesfalls überzogen. Aber ich würdes es vermutlich auch nicht glauben, wenn ich es nicht schon mit eigenen Augen gesehen hätte.

Ich hoffe auf eine baldige Übersetzung für den deutschen Markt!
Kommentar War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein Feedback senden...
Vielen Dank für Ihr Feedback. Wenn diese Rezension unangemessen ist, informieren Sie uns bitte darüber.
Wir konnten Ihre Stimmabgabe leider nicht speichern. Bitte erneut versuchen

Die neuesten Kundenrezensionen