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The Unschooled Mind: How Children Think and How Schools Should Teach [Kindle Edition]

Howard Gardner
3.8 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (4 Kundenrezensionen)

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Kindle Edition, 29. März 2011 EUR 9,37  
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Taschenbuch EUR 12,36  


Produktbeschreibungen

From Publishers Weekly

The failings of schools have been discussed and analyzed from a dazzling array of perspectives. In this study, the author, a professor at the Harvard School of Education and a practitioner of cognitive science based on a theory of multiple intelligences, adopts a credibly innovative approach, contending that even when a school appears to succeed, "it typically fails to achieve its most important missions." The root flaw, as he views it, is a lack of "genuine understanding"--as opposed to "acceptable mastery"--on the student's part. Gardner sees access to better education in the alliance of three potential teammates: the intuitive preschooler, the traditional older child working through a curriculum, and an expert/teacher capable of extending skills and understandings in new ways. One answer to why so many students lose their enthusiasm for school is found here, as well as promising proposals for school reform, like museum collaborations and apprenticeship projects. Gardner's study offers a wealth of material for significant school restructuring.
Copyright 1991 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Kirkus Reviews

A convincing call to reexamine the way children learn in their earliest years, and to make use of those new findings in classrooms. MacArthur fellow Gardner (Education/Harvard; To Open Minds, 1989, etc.) developed a theory that human beings learn and perform through multiple intelligences (seven, to be precise, from verbal to kinesthetic and interpersonal). His own and other studies in these areas revealed that students who may be letter-perfect in a school subject such as physics fail spectacularly in transferring that knowledge from classroom exercises to problems in the real world. Even adults abandon book learning and invoke pictures of the world--including stereotypes about the forces of gravity or about skin color--that they constructed as early as five years old. The emperor is exposed as being not only naked but ignorant. If such early childhood ``schema,'' as Piaget called them, are so tenacious, then harness them for learning in the advanced classroom, Gardner advises. He recommends reevaluating the concept of apprenticeships and using the hands-on, multimedia techniques seen in children's museum programs. The developmental theories of Piaget and Chomsky are respectfully challenged, the push to ``cultural literacy'' and ``back to basics'' less respectfully. At issue is the unexamined idea. Gardner calls for schools and teachers to encourage personal ``Christopherian confrontations,'' the encounter between belief and reality that Christopher Columbus presented when he did not sail off the edge of the world. An exciting proposal for restructuring schools in order to guide students to a genuine understanding of the world. A bonus is the extraordinary insight into why children and adults seem to resist learning and why they often behave in such mystifying ways. -- Copyright ©1991, Kirkus Associates, LP. All rights reserved.

Produktinformation

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • Dateigröße: 654 KB
  • Seitenzahl der Print-Ausgabe: 354 Seiten
  • ISBN-Quelle für Seitenzahl: 0465024386
  • Verlag: Basic Books; Auflage: 2 (29. März 2011)
  • Verkauf durch: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ASIN: B004MYFUYG
  • Text-to-Speech (Vorlesemodus): Aktiviert
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Nicht aktiviert
  • Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung: 3.8 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (4 Kundenrezensionen)
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: #314.306 Bezahlt in Kindle-Shop (Siehe Top 100 Bezahlt in Kindle-Shop)

  •  Ist der Verkauf dieses Produkts für Sie nicht akzeptabel?

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2 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen How to School the Unschooled Mind 25. April 2000
Format:Taschenbuch
Howard Gardner's book The Unschooled Mind is an excellent source for teachers and administrators alike. It examines the different kinds of learners and how current educational practices are not addressing those learners. By reading this book, teachers and administrators will gain a better sense of cognitive development and can therefore design curriculum to best suit their students' needs. The Unschooled Mind is organized in a very pleasing format. There are three main sections. The first section tells about cognitive, psychological, and educational research, including the theory of multiple intelligences. In the second section, educational norms and institutions are discussed. The third section of the book gives suggestions for solutions and calls for educational reform. I especially enjoyed the format of the book because it sequences theory, practice, and reform. The main question addressed is why students do not master what they should be learning. Gardner states that educators have traditionally accepted rote and ritualistic learning. However, does this show genuine understanding? Even "successful" students often do not possess a deep sense of class material. Teachers need to take into account multiple intelligences and realize that not all students learn, solve problems, or undertake tasks in the same manner. People acquire knowledge in different ways. Studies have shown that children can master complex domains, but not those designed in school curriculums. It was so fascinating for me to read about developmental theorists and, especially, to compare the studies of Darwin and Piaget to modern research about brain development. Lesen Sie weiter... ›
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?
3.0 von 5 Sternen Ein informartives Buch-leider etwas zu theoretisch 24. September 2013
Format:Taschenbuch|Verifizierter Kauf
Das Buch war zwar informativ, aber die wirkliche Methodik, nach der in der Schule gelehrt werden sollte, wurde erst in den letzten Kapiteln des Buches behandelt. Vorher war es recht theoretisch.
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?
4.0 von 5 Sternen A Must for Today's Educators 10. März 1999
Von Ein Kunde
Format:Taschenbuch
This is important reading for all teachers and administrators. Gardner provides powerful insights into why schools aren't producing students with the skills to solve problems in real-life settings. His ideas help us examine how schools today could effectively teach for understanding.
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?
4.0 von 5 Sternen A Must for Today's Educators 10. März 1999
Von Ein Kunde
Format:Taschenbuch
This is important reading for all teachers and administrators. Gardner provides powerful insights into why schools aren't producing students with the skills to solve problems in real-life settings. His ideas help us examine how schools today could effectively teach for understanding.
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?
Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen auf Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.1 von 5 Sternen  14 Rezensionen
97 von 101 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen How to School the Unschooled Mind 25. April 2000
Von Jennifer Castillo - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch
Howard Gardner's book The Unschooled Mind is an excellent source for teachers and administrators alike. It examines the different kinds of learners and how current educational practices are not addressing those learners. By reading this book, teachers and administrators will gain a better sense of cognitive development and can therefore design curriculum to best suit their students' needs. The Unschooled Mind is organized in a very pleasing format. There are three main sections. The first section tells about cognitive, psychological, and educational research, including the theory of multiple intelligences. In the second section, educational norms and institutions are discussed. The third section of the book gives suggestions for solutions and calls for educational reform. I especially enjoyed the format of the book because it sequences theory, practice, and reform. The main question addressed is why students do not master what they should be learning. Gardner states that educators have traditionally accepted rote and ritualistic learning. However, does this show genuine understanding? Even "successful" students often do not possess a deep sense of class material. Teachers need to take into account multiple intelligences and realize that not all students learn, solve problems, or undertake tasks in the same manner. People acquire knowledge in different ways. Studies have shown that children can master complex domains, but not those designed in school curriculums. It was so fascinating for me to read about developmental theorists and, especially, to compare the studies of Darwin and Piaget to modern research about brain development. Since society, education, and culture influence children as they grow, it is important for teachers to create meaningful learning experiences. A quote in the second section of the book completely intrigued me: "By the time the child has reached the age of seven or so, his development has become completely intertwined with the values and goals of the culture. (Gardner, chapter 5) It made me think of how my job as a teacher-in addition to the jobs of administrators, who design school curriculum-is so important. If educators, as experts, design school curriculum, they contribute to the understanding of learners. So how should knowledge be taught so that it provides that deep sense of understanding we seek? Reading the examples of content areas and students' understandings and interpretations of them was very interesting to me because it helped me to see the importance of constructing instructions well. It also helped me to see the great variety of understandings that students have and how to take those different understandings into account for assessment purposes. Education today calls for constructive, activity-centered learning (a la John Dewey). I know that my entire school day does not consist of strictly collaborative learning. Learning basic skills requires some drilling. I just need to find the best balance in my teaching. The Unschooled Mind helped me realize how important parents and teachers are to children's lives and how they need to take great care in creating meaningful learning experiences for their children.
84 von 89 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Howard Gardner is a brilliant man!! 26. Juni 2001
Von JMack - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch
I read this book a few years ago as part of a course in my Master's degree program. I had some familiarity with Gardner's work, mainly the seven intelligences. However, until an educator has read this book, the educator can not apply the seven intelligences in the class room or teach effectively.
My dad once told me that I never learn anything until I break something. I was 16 and had just wrecked my first car. I never crashed again. This is the concept behind Gardner's book. We learn from our experiences. We learn by applying knowledge in real life situation. Knowledge is not necessarily power, but it is part of the equation. After teaching concepts in my class with follow-up assignments which were real life activities/experiences, I saw test results improve and student interest increase dramatically. Students only want to learn what is useful to them so teachers must show subject matter to be relavent to the student's lives. Gardner explains how a students mind can grow through these means.
This is a great read even if you are a parent who want to explore how your child learns. Highly recommended!
40 von 45 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Using Unschooled Minds in the Special-Needs classroom 28. März 2001
Von Ein Kunde - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch
I have read and re-read Unschooled Minds by Howard Gardner to better understand how my colleagues and me, as teachers, can better instruct our students with regard to each student's cognitive and skills abilities in mind.
Gardner's theory that each child contains several intelligences (i.e., mathematical/logistical, intrapersonal, interpersonal, kinesthetic, with one or more predominating) appears to be a viable thoery in my experiences as an instructor. This book has allowed me to understand why some children simply don't respond to the traditional ways of teaching. Reading this has reduced the frustration level for both me and my students, and has let me expand my methods and level of instruction. Since I also am in favor of apprenticeships for students (matching their skills w/ jobs) and taking risks, this book appealed to my own philosophies.
Possibly the best legacy of Gardner's teaching is that many children who would otherwise be left-for-dead instructionally are now being taught to good results using Gardner's methods, including my own.
4 von 4 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Long live research! 16. September 2012
Von Branko - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch|Verifizierter Kauf
This book has a quality of a hearty home cooked meal; it's slowly braised in the passion-powered oven; it's made with a delicate combination of fresh ingredients (quantitative research and its long-term applications); its aroma has a lure of the fusion cuisine. Add to that a dash of historical flavor in developmental child psychology and you have a very palatable, highly nutritious food for thought. But wait, there is more! I will share this meal with my students.
17 von 24 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen A Must for Today's Educators 10. März 1999
Von Ein Kunde - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch
This is important reading for all teachers and administrators. Gardner provides powerful insights into why schools aren't producing students with the skills to solve problems in real-life settings. His ideas help us examine how schools today could effectively teach for understanding.
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