The Unhealthy Truth und über 1,5 Millionen weitere Bücher verfügbar für Amazon Kindle. Erfahren Sie mehr


oder
Loggen Sie sich ein, um 1-Click® einzuschalten.
oder
Mit kostenloser Probeteilnahme bei Amazon Prime. Melden Sie sich während des Bestellvorgangs an.
Jetzt eintauschen
und EUR 1,02 Gutschein erhalten
Eintausch
Alle Angebote
Möchten Sie verkaufen? Hier verkaufen
Der Artikel ist in folgender Variante leider nicht verfügbar
Keine Abbildung vorhanden für
Farbe:
Keine Abbildung vorhanden

 
Beginnen Sie mit dem Lesen von The Unhealthy Truth auf Ihrem Kindle in weniger als einer Minute.

Sie haben keinen Kindle? Hier kaufen oder eine gratis Kindle Lese-App herunterladen.

The Unhealthy Truth: One Mother's Shocking Investigation into the Dangers of America's Food Supply-- and What Every Family Can Do to Protect Itself [Englisch] [Taschenbuch]

Robyn O'Brien , Rachel Kranz

Statt: EUR 11,15
Jetzt: EUR 10,90 kostenlose Lieferung. Siehe Details.
Sie sparen: EUR 0,25 (2%)
  Alle Preisangaben inkl. MwSt.
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
Nur noch 1 auf Lager (mehr ist unterwegs).
Verkauf und Versand durch Amazon. Geschenkverpackung verfügbar.
Lieferung bis Montag, 14. Juli: Wählen Sie an der Kasse Morning-Express. Siehe Details.

Weitere Ausgaben

Amazon-Preis Neu ab Gebraucht ab
Kindle Edition EUR 7,78  
Gebundene Ausgabe EUR 18,41  
Taschenbuch EUR 10,90  

Kurzbeschreibung

11. Mai 2010
Robyn O’Brien is not the most likely candidate for an antiestablishment crusade. A Houston native from a conservative family, this MBA and married mother of four was not someone who gave much thought to misguided government agencies and chemicals in our food—until the day her youngest daughter had a violent allergic reaction to eggs, and everything changed. The Unhealthy Truth is both the story of how one brave woman chose to take on the system and a call to action that shows how each of us can do our part and keep our own families safe.

O’Brien turns to accredited research conducted in Europe that confirms the toxicity of America’s food supply, and traces the relationship between Big Food and Big Money that has ensured that the United States is one of the only developed countries in the world to allow hidden toxins in our food—toxins that can be blamed for the alarming recent increases in allergies, ADHD, cancer, and asthma among our children. Featuring recipes and an action plan for weaning your family off dangerous chemicals one step at a time The Unhealthy Truth is a must-read for every parent—and for every concerned citizen—in America today.

Produktinformation


Mehr über den Autor

Entdecken Sie Bücher, lesen Sie über Autoren und mehr

Produktbeschreibungen

Über den Autor und weitere Mitwirkende

Robyn O’Brien is the founder of AllergyKids. She has been featured in the New York Times and has appeared on CNN, Good Morning America, and the CBS Early Show and Evening News. She lives with her family in Boulder, Colorado.

Rachel Kranz is a novelist, nonfiction writer, and playwright who lives in New York City. Her most recent novel is Leaps of Faith (2000). 

In diesem Buch (Mehr dazu)
Ausgewählte Seiten ansehen
Buchdeckel | Copyright | Inhaltsverzeichnis | Auszug | Stichwortverzeichnis
Hier reinlesen und suchen:

Kundenrezensionen

Es gibt noch keine Kundenrezensionen auf Amazon.de
5 Sterne
4 Sterne
3 Sterne
2 Sterne
1 Sterne
Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen auf Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.6 von 5 Sternen  127 Rezensionen
194 von 202 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Parents; READ THIS BOOK! 20. Mai 2009
Von Rui Jie - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe
The food industry pissed off the wrong Mommy of Four. Sarah Palin might call Robyn O'Brien (author of The Unhealthy Truth) a pitbull with lipstick. She might be blond and pretty, but when her youngest child, Tory, had an allergic reaction to eggs, she didn't take "Don't worry your pretty little head about it" for an answer. Why are allergies and asthma on such a rise in America?

The answers were largely: We don't know and we're not really studying it. Better yet, there were two competing camps that each thought the other one's strategy would harm the kids. One thought you should expose your kids to the foods they are allergic to in small doses to see if the allergy would go away, and the other thought you should totally avoid any contact to the allergic food at all to see if it would go away. Riiight. It's nice to have theories, it's nice to do research, but what happens if you have kids, they have allergies, and you have to feed them NOW?

Much of this book is a personal story of the O'Brien family and their four children, Lexy, Colin, John, and Tory. Once upon a time they were a happy family of four, complete with Kraft Mac n Cheese, blue yogurt, dinosaur shaped chicken nuggets, and colorful goldfish crackers. And then, when Tory was nine months old and the oldest, Lexy, was five, things changed in an instant.

Tory ate some eggs and her face puffed up and turned red. A few doctors' appointments later, she was diagnosed with an allergy to eggs. Life in the O'Brien house changed. Now - it didn't change overnight. Robyn was raised in so-called Red America (Houston, actually), with a military father and a conservative, Republican background. Not that that shapes one's eating habits per se, but it can tend toward an attitude of not questioning authority. Robyn had been doing everything you're supposed to do to be a good mother - including those dino-shaped nuggets - and when Tory got sick, she wanted to make her child well.

So she started researching. And researching. And the answers didn't add up. And then she found out that Kraft funded the nation's major allergy non-profit. Whoops. Maybe that was why that allergy group wasn't so thrilled to acknowledge some of the research that was out there about potential links between allergies and GMOs? (GMOs that you eat in Kraft foods, that is.)

After all that research, Robyn condenses the possible causes of increasing allergies to the following list:

1. The shift from a natural to an industrial environment
2. Excessive exposure to antibiotics, both as prescribed to our children and as consumed through antibiotic-laden meat, milk, and poultry.
3. The rise in pollutants and environmental toxins (perhaps including the fumes and residues from some of the chemical products we use to clean our homes).
4. Our tendency to eat more processed foods loaded with chemical additives and preservatives and to eat far fewer natural whole foods.

As it turned out, it wasn't just Tory who had allergies. In fact, I found her son Colin's story even MORE interesting. Tory's allergy is the sort of thing you hear about all the time, and while it's a scary thing that a child could potentially die from eating a normal and ubiquitous food like eggs, at least it's easy to diagnose as an allergy. But then there is Colin, who drank milk like it was his job for YEARS.

Colin suffered from eczema, frequent ear infections, and more. Nobody knew why. Nobody assumed food played a role. Robyn took him to the doctor and they prescribed drugs and put tubes in his ears. Then the family tried an unintentional experiment. A week without milk during a family vacation. Suddenly the eczema started to clear up. Hmmm. Turns out Colin had a milk allergy. Not only did his health change for the better, but the dairy-free Colin had a happier personality!

It was events like that that ultimately led Robyn to remove far more than the diagnosed allergens from her children's diets. What about artificial coloring? And why were other countries removing it from their food but we weren't? As it turned out, the additives in our food (like the coloring) can have an effect on children's behavior. So as a parent, it's not just about being a tree-hugging hippie if you want to feed your kids an all-natural diet. It's about fewer tantrums and getting more sleep at night.

The Unhealthy Truth goes off into subjects that I largely shy away from, like the effects of GMOs on our health. I keep waiting for more definitive science and broad consensus about them before I speak up, but as I said before, if you're a mom and you're feeding four kids, you need the answer yesterday. What was that Rumsfeld quote - we go to war with the army we have, not the army we wish we had? Right. O'Brien had to make her decisions based on the science we have. Pathetically little science, very often.

I can see readers criticizing some of the research studies she cites, in fact, because they certainly aren't of the caliber you might want in order to judge whether one particular food additive or technology is safe, but that's exactly the point. Nobody DID the comprehensive study to prove the foods safe or unsafe, and O'Brien notes that. So she advocates doing as the Europeans do and using the Precautionary Principle: A food must be proven safe before we eat it. Americans, on the other hand, typically like to profit first, and ask questions later. Our population and our children can be the guinea pigs and when somebody gets sick, or many people get sick, we'll consider taking a food off the market.

All in all, I like this book. I think it's a terrific contribution to Americans waking up to the realities of their food and its problems. Robyn provides MANY tips on how to wean kids off of their blue yogurt and dino-nugget diets to healthier foods, and she does so in a non-intimidating way for people who may have never strayed far off the industrial food path ever before. However, she does not advocate for purity, nor does she intend to. And I don't see that as a pont to criticize her for - she's focused on reality and for some people, going from totally processed factory farmed chemical laden junk to less processed factory farmed meat is a great step up. I believe that people make changes when they are ready, and I hope that this book will engage new people into this dialogue who may have never questioned their food before. When people are ready, they might seek out a farmers market or get a pet chicken. Or they might not. But at least they aren't serving up blue yogurt anymore.
144 von 163 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen a skeptical scientist 12. Mai 2009
Von A. Student - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe
As a research scientist with a doctorate in the health care field, I will admit that I read this book with skepticism. Robyn O'Brien has no scientific training, and I didn't understand what made her qualified to write such a book as this one - a book that, in order to be plausible for its claims, essentially required an in-depth critical review of the current research on food allergies. After reading the book, I was glad to see that she recognized her limitations as a scientist and that she collaborated with some experts in the field - although not to the level that I would have liked to see. She writes in a very non-scientific way, which probably appeals to more audiences, but there is a lot of repetition of her thought processes, events, and even some facts. Having said that, I believe that her background in business was extremely beneficial to the plausibility of this book, particularly as she uncovered the links between big business and the food industry. While I am still skeptical that she was really able to critically examine the medical articles that she uses to back up her arguments, I do believe that she makes some very interesting - if not extremely obvious - linkages between the manufacturing and processing of food in the US and the current chronic medical epidemics (such as autism, food allergies, obesity, ADHD, asthma etc..) that can not be ignored.

At the very least, this book is a call for action from researchers to recognize that there is a tremendous need for more rigorous studies examining the effects of the chemicals used in the manufacturing, processing and, well, growing of the foods that we eat and the foods that we feed our children. This book shows that there is indeed enough evidence to support further examination of the relationships between the more recent changes in our food and the many medical epidemics we are now facing as a country - particularly food allergies.

And even if all of her arguments and claims of these relationships turn out to be false, her message is still useful. Continuing to eat foods filled with additives, preservatives and pre-modifications that have controversial evidence (if any evidence) for their health effects - AND that are generally banned or excessively labeled in other countries - just seems ignorant. It wouldn't hurt for any of us to educate ourselves on what we are eating and to improve our diets with more natural, less manufactured products. I would definitely recommend this book.
53 von 57 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen The full disclosure you ought to get... 10. Mai 2009
Von Wayward - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe
As someone with a corn allergy/intolerance I'm already disillusioned with the "system". FAAN isn't what they seem to be and the people who feed us are in it for the money.

But, somehow, I've always believed that it couldn't be "that" bad. I mean, the government DOES have regulations. Right?

This book, written as a description of the author's research discoveries and journey out of food ignorance bliss, is even more alarming from it's first person tone. It isn't written by an expert. It's written by a Mom who just started out looking for answers for her child and found herself in the middle of something bigger.

This is a wake up call for all of us. We know about GMO, and petrochemicals and hormones in our food supply. Many of us worry about them, but let them take a back burner to little league and homework and deadlines. Reading some of Robyn's discoveries makes one realize that we need to re-evaluate our priorities, and vote with our personal choices. She also offers good advice on starting the journey away from "norm" with simple steps on getting started on life without GMO or additives, and a low pressure reassurance that no one is perfect...all you can do is aim for improvement.
79 von 88 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen Just Ok 19. Januar 2011
Von Amazon Customer - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch|Verifizierter Kauf
I wanted to like this book and in many ways I did like it. The author has a very engaging writing style. But what is "shocking" to me is that the author sort of stops short. Preservatives are bad for you! So is artificial food coloring!! GM Corn and Soy too! Actually, soy is really bad for you!

Is this news to anyone? Perhaps you didn't know that agribusiness was peddling different food (sans offending ingredients) to our European frieds. Maybe you didn't know that doctors whose entire existence depend on people being sick may have conflicts of interest. Maybe you didn't get the message that soy is fairly close to poison. But then the author stops. She offers ridiculous "recipe" suggestions then pads the book out with references. End of story.

No discussion about the actual food supply. How does food get to your table? She doesn't really get the connection between feeding GM Corn and Soy to Cattle/Chickens/Pigs and how this is actually making our meat unhealthy by changing the fat profiles of the meat and eggs.

No discussion about the pitfalls of refined carbohydrates and their prevalence in our diets. If you read her recipes in the book, her family eats a pretty solid low fat/high carb diet. No discussion about whether this is, in fact, "healthy". No discussion about how the food pyramid and school lunches are based on zero scientific evidence.

I was looking for more. I don't seriously think advocating mac and cheese (but the white cheddar kind) is really protecting your family from unhealthy foods. This book is for someone who has never, ever researched food issues and wants to get started. Otherwise, it's a pedestrian effort. The title is quite misleading, if the author really wants to be shocked, she should read Gary Taubes' "Good Calories, Bad Calories".
15 von 17 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
2.0 von 5 Sternen Some good info but very repetitive 11. April 2013
Von BookWormHeather - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition|Verifizierter Kauf
I'm very interested in this topic and have read several books about the US food industry, big pharma, big food, etc so I bought this book for Kindle with high hopes for a new perspective. The author presents little new information, though I can appreciate the marketing to parents - mothers of small children may pick this book up as opposed to others based on the cover and tagline. That said, the author is pretty annoying. She mentions her MBA at every opportunity and repeats a few key ideas throughout the book. It seemed she was more interested in using the book to toot her own horn than presenting as many facts as possible. If you are a mother that is feeding your young child one of the five foods she mentions 100 times (milk, blue yogurt, goldfish crackers, Kraft mac 'n cheese, diet pop) you may benefit from reading this from cover to cover. If not, pick up a book by an actual scientist or researcher with clear action items aimed at an average citizen.
Waren diese Rezensionen hilfreich?   Wir wollen von Ihnen hören.

Kunden diskutieren

Das Forum zu diesem Produkt
Diskussion Antworten Jüngster Beitrag
Noch keine Diskussionen

Fragen stellen, Meinungen austauschen, Einblicke gewinnen
Neue Diskussion starten
Thema:
Erster Beitrag:
Eingabe des Log-ins
 

Kundendiskussionen durchsuchen
Alle Amazon-Diskussionen durchsuchen
   


Ähnliche Artikel finden


Ihr Kommentar