EUR 40,81
  • Alle Preisangaben inkl. MwSt.
Nur noch 1 auf Lager (mehr ist unterwegs).
Verkauf und Versand durch Amazon.
Geschenkverpackung verfügbar.
Menge:1
Ihren Artikel jetzt
eintauschen und
EUR 1,00 Gutschein erhalten.
Möchten Sie verkaufen?
Zur Rückseite klappen Zur Vorderseite klappen
Anhören Wird wiedergegeben... Angehalten   Sie hören eine Probe der Audible-Audioausgabe.
Weitere Informationen
Dieses Bild anzeigen

The Telephone Book: Technology, Schizophrenia, Electric Speech (Englisch) Taschenbuch – 1. Juni 1989


Alle Formate und Ausgaben anzeigen Andere Formate und Ausgaben ausblenden
Amazon-Preis Neu ab Gebraucht ab
Taschenbuch
"Bitte wiederholen"
EUR 40,81
EUR 35,04 EUR 22,88
8 neu ab EUR 35,04 5 gebraucht ab EUR 22,88
Jeder kann Kindle Bücher lesen — selbst ohne ein Kindle-Gerät — mit der KOSTENFREIEN Kindle App für Smartphones, Tablets und Computer.


Produktinformation

  • Taschenbuch: 466 Seiten
  • Verlag: Univ of Nebraska Pr; Auflage: Revised. (1. Juni 1989)
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ISBN-10: 0803289383
  • ISBN-13: 978-0803289383
  • Größe und/oder Gewicht: 2,5 x 14 x 25,4 cm
  • Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung: 2.5 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (2 Kundenrezensionen)
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: Nr. 347.716 in Fremdsprachige Bücher (Siehe Top 100 in Fremdsprachige Bücher)

Mehr über den Autor

Entdecken Sie Bücher, lesen Sie über Autoren und mehr

Produktbeschreibungen

Pressestimmen

"A breakthrough work within the universe of academic publications./i>--Warren Lehrer "Designers & Books "

Synopsis

'Avital Ronell installs the telephone in the space of thinking Heidegger reserves for poetry and art, producing a series of reflections on philosophy, psychoanalysis and biography that may come to represent one of the most decisive readings of the technological since Heidegger' - "Substance" "With "The Telephone Book", the deconstruction of 'phonocentrism' takes an unheard-of turn: Heidegger and Derrida are joined by Alexander Graham ('Ma') Bell in a party line that leaves one's ears (and eyes) ringing. Working with an advanced form of optical fiber, Avital Ronell establishes scandalously clear connections between her long-distance callers, and through them, between the mediatic and the literary, the technological and the political, the historical and the philosophical. In the White and Yellow Pages that result, 'criticism' catches up with the telephone and becomes rigorously colloquial' - Samuel Weber, "International Operator".'To think technology is not to think technology away. Avital Ronell calls us from afar. She does not think the question concerning technology by submitting it merely to evaluation, as has been done so often and so poorly.

Rather, she seeks out what 'thinks' in technology and what is 'technological' in thinking. Her concern is located not in the instrumentality of technology with its good and bad points, but in unfolding the presence of technology in discourse, as discourse, or as the silence hidden within discourse. For example, when Heidegger refers to a telephone call whose political stakes are anything but indifferent, how is the 'call' of 'conscience' thereby implicated?The telephone serves here to open a line of inquiry, producing a series of analyses, eliciting a totally unprecendented style, whose general rule would be: how technoogy stimulates metaphorization, how it transports beyond itself, and gives way to thinking. That in the end it should bear something of the feminine, or that the mode of transport may itself be feminine (la tele-phonie), is the message waiting on our answering maching. Beep. Click. Blurb' - Jean-Luc Nancy, University of Strasbourg, France.The telephone marks the place of an absence.

Affiliated with discontinuity, alarm, and silence, it raises fundamental questions about the constitution of self and other, the stability of location, systems of transfer, and the destination of speech. Profoundly changing our concept of long-distance, it is constantly transmitting effects of real and evocative power. To the extent that it always relates us to the absent other, the telephone, and the massive switchboard attending it, plugs into a hermeneutics of mourning. "The Telephone Book", itself organized by a 'telephonic logic', fields calls from philosophy, history, literature, and psychoanalysis.It installs a switchboard that hooks up diverse types of knowledge while rerouting and jamming the codes of the disciplines in daring ways. Avital Ronell has done nothing less than ocnsider the impact of the telephone on modern thought. Her highly original, multifaceted inquiry into the nature of communication in a technological age will excite everyone who listens in.The book begins by calling close attention to the importance of the telephone in Nazi organization and propaganda, with special regard to the philosophy of Martin Heidegger.

In the "Third Reich" the telephone became a weapon, a means of state surveillance, 'an open accomplice to lies'. Heidegger, in "Being and Time" and elsewhere, elaborates on the significance of 'the call'. In a tour de force response, Ronell mobilizes the history and terminology of the telephone to explicate his difficult philosophy. Ronell also speaks of the appearance of the telephone in the literary works of Duras, Joyce, Kafka, Rilke, and Strindberg. She examines its role in psychoanalysis - Freud said that the unconscious is structured like a telephone, and Jung and R. D. Laing saw it as a powerful new body part. She traces its historical development from Bell's famous first call: 'Watson, come here!'Thomas A. Watson, his assistant, who used to communicate with spirits, was eager to get the telephone to talk, and thus to link technology with phantoms and phantasms. In many ways a meditation on the technologically constituted state, "The Telephone Book" opens a new field, becoming the first political deconstruction of technology, state terrorism, and schizophrenia.

And it offers a fresh reading of the American and European addiction to technology in which the telephone emerges as the crucial figure of this age. Avital Ronell is an associate professor of comparative literature at the University of California, Berkeley. Her first book, "Dictations: On Haunted Writing" (1986), treats Goethe's invention of remote control in writing.

Kundenrezensionen

2.5 von 5 Sternen
5 Sterne
0
4 Sterne
1
3 Sterne
0
2 Sterne
0
1 Sterne
1
Beide Kundenrezensionen anzeigen
Sagen Sie Ihre Meinung zu diesem Artikel

Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen

0 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von Ein Kunde am 17. Februar 2000
Format: Taschenbuch
This book is a playful, yet serious look at technology and its relation to the philosophy that defines our 20th-century thinking and the metaphysical breakdown it embodies. Ronell's writing is often beautiful, and the typeset of the book is highly original and interesting. Addressing Heidegger, Graham Bell, psychoanalytic thinking and other such topics, all via telephonics, this book challenges its readers in a creative, critical way.
Kommentar War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein Feedback senden...
Vielen Dank für Ihr Feedback. Wenn diese Rezension unangemessen ist, informieren Sie uns bitte darüber.
Wir konnten Ihre Stimmabgabe leider nicht speichern. Bitte erneut versuchen
0 von 3 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von Ein Kunde am 26. August 1999
Format: Taschenbuch
This work is a deeply depressing, albeit necessary reading for all those concerned about the decline and fall of the American Academy today. Its "thesis" is scarcely original, and in Ms. Ronell's hands, is nothing more than a hackneyed metaphor standing in for reasoned analysis; it is abysmally organized, losing even its main threads of discussion along the way. Most depressing of all is that in an attempt to mask her lack of critical substance, Ms. Ronell makes continuous and absurd resort to obscurantist rhetoric and sheer, unmitigated jargon. If nothing else, the book is a sign of the times, exemplifying the arrogant disregard for even minimal scholarly standards that so prevails in American literature departments (she is apparently on the German faculty at NYU: can this be true?), and leading to the sad realization that such individuals are taking the place of legitimate, accomplished scholars, and are teaching our students how to think and write. For all these reasons this is a truly demoralizing book, though a must read for any parent contemplating sending his/her child to university for training in literary and cultural studies.
Kommentar War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein Feedback senden...
Vielen Dank für Ihr Feedback. Wenn diese Rezension unangemessen ist, informieren Sie uns bitte darüber.
Wir konnten Ihre Stimmabgabe leider nicht speichern. Bitte erneut versuchen

Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen auf Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 5 Rezensionen
12 von 18 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Stunning 17. Februar 2000
Von Ein Kunde - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch
This book is a playful, yet serious look at technology and its relation to the philosophy that defines our 20th-century thinking and the metaphysical breakdown it embodies. Ronell's writing is often beautiful, and the typeset of the book is highly original and interesting. Addressing Heidegger, Graham Bell, psychoanalytic thinking and other such topics, all via telephonics, this book challenges its readers in a creative, critical way.
8 von 14 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
A Work of Art 30. Dezember 2008
Von Benjamin Andrew - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch
This book is a masterpiece of typography. This is not mentioned enough on the amazon page here. As the book delves further into the schizophrenic/paranoid meditation on the concept of telephones, the text parallels the writing's insanity in the form of angled passages, strangely uncomfortable size variations, and some truly mind-bending blurred words. I was very intrigued by the notions of the telephone and its place in our world. It truly is an insane machine that we all take for granted. The book is very verbose, but anything less would undermine its authority and its lingual nature. I have to emphasize again how much value this book holds as a physical object. It is tall and narrow, black with subtle raised squares on the cover. The masterful use of text inside amplifies the sense of mystery and dread relating to its subject. It's like a tome, containing the untold secrets of our docile little telephones.
6 von 15 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Avital is Cool-- 18. Juni 2004
Von Ein Kunde - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch
those who want to protect the "integrity" of academia would not enjoy this book, but what can I say? Avital is a punk. She does not ask you to love her. Yet I find her writings generous; those who always feel to be orphans of society can understand what is going on in this book as well as her "Crack Wars" and recent "Stupidity." She is very much interested in transforming the world. I am contiually inspired by her writings. Aside from Nietzsche, she is the only one who has shown me that philosophy can be rock n roll.
21 von 55 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Jarring. 26. August 1999
Von Ein Kunde - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch
This work is a deeply depressing, albeit necessary reading for all those concerned about the decline and fall of the American Academy today. Its "thesis" is scarcely original, and in Ms. Ronell's hands, is nothing more than a hackneyed metaphor standing in for reasoned analysis; it is abysmally organized, losing even its main threads of discussion along the way. Most depressing of all is that in an attempt to mask her lack of critical substance, Ms. Ronell makes continuous and absurd resort to obscurantist rhetoric and sheer, unmitigated jargon. If nothing else, the book is a sign of the times, exemplifying the arrogant disregard for even minimal scholarly standards that so prevails in American literature departments (she is apparently on the German faculty at NYU: can this be true?), and leading to the sad realization that such individuals are taking the place of legitimate, accomplished scholars, and are teaching our students how to think and write. For all these reasons this is a truly demoralizing book, though a must read for any parent contemplating sending his/her child to university for training in literary and cultural studies.
6 von 23 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
jarred old coots 21. Dezember 2000
Von Ein Kunde - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch
Ronell is the new scholarship. Praised be. Her style is innovative and she actually has something new to say about dead white guys. It's high time professors on respirators retired anyway. PS: She's the CHAIR of German Lit., Dr. Geezer.
Waren diese Rezensionen hilfreich? Wir wollen von Ihnen hören.