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The Sword and the Shield: The Mitrokhin Archive and the Secret History of the KGB [Englisch] [Taschenbuch]

Christopher Andrew , Vasili Mitrokhin
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Kurzbeschreibung

28. August 2000
. Christopher Andrews new book is based on one of the most extraordinary intelligence coups of recent times: the discovery of a treasure-trove of highly classified documents which the FBI has described, after close examination, as the most complete and extensive intelligence ever received from any source. Though there is top-secret material on almost every country in the world, the United States is at the top of the list. The contents of the book remain embargoed until publication. As well as containing many fascinating revelations, this is a major contribution to the secret history of the twentieth century. } The Sword and the Shield is based on one of the most extraordinary intelligence coups of recent times: a secret archive of top-level KGB documents smuggled out of the Soviet Union which the FBI has described, after close examination, as the "most complete and extensive intelligence ever received from any source. " Its presence in the West represents a catastrophic hemorrhage of the KGBs secrets and reveals for the first time the full extent of its worldwide network.Vasili Mitrokhin, a secret dissident who worked in the KGB archive, smuggled out copies of its most highly classified files every day for twelve years. In 1992, a U.S. ally succeeded in exfiltrating the KGB officer and his entire archive out of Moscow. The archive covers the entire period from the Bolshevik Revolution to the 1980s and includes revelations concerning almost every country in the world. But the KGB's main target, of course, was the United States.Though there is top-secret material on almost every country in the world, the United States is at the top of the list. As well as containing many fascinating revelations, this is a major contribution to the secret history of the twentieth century.Among the topics and revelations explored are: *The KGBs covert operations in the United States and throughout the West, some of which remain dangerous today. *KGB files on Oswald and the JFK assassination that Boris Yeltsin almost certainly has no intention of showing President Clinton. *The KGBs attempts to discredit civil rights leader in the 1960s, including its infiltration of the inner circle of a key leader. *The KGBs use of radio intercept posts in New York and Washington, D.C., in the 1970s to intercept high-level U.S. government communications. *The KGBs attempts to steal technological secrets from major U.S. aerospace and technology corporations. *KGB covert operations against former President Ronald Reagan, which began five years before he became president. *KGB spies who successfully posed as U.S. citizens under a series of ingenious disguises, including several who attained access to the upper echelons of New York society.. }

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Produktinformation

  • Taschenbuch: 700 Seiten
  • Verlag: Basic Books; Auflage: New title (28. August 2000)
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ISBN-10: 0465003125
  • ISBN-13: 978-0465003129
  • Größe und/oder Gewicht: 4,9 x 14,6 x 22,2 cm
  • Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung: 3.6 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (32 Kundenrezensionen)
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: Nr. 170.637 in Fremdsprachige Bücher (Siehe Top 100 in Fremdsprachige Bücher)
  • Komplettes Inhaltsverzeichnis ansehen

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Produktbeschreibungen

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In early 1992, a Russian man walked into the British embassy in a newly independent Baltic republic and asked to "speak to someone in authority." As he sipped his first cup of proper English tea, he handed over a small file of notes. Eight months later, the man, his family, and his enormous archive had been safely exfiltrated to Britain. When news that a KGB officer had defected with the names of hundreds of undercover agents leaked out in 1996, a spokesperson for the SVR (Russia's foreign intelligence service, heir of the KGB) said, "Hundreds of people! That just doesn't happen! Any defector could get the name of one, two, perhaps three agents--but not hundreds!"

Vasili Nikitich Mitrokhin worked as chief archivist for the FCD, the foreign-intelligence arm of the KGB. Mitrokhin was responsible for checking and sealing approximately 300,000 files, allowing him unrestricted access to one of the world's most closely guarded archives. He had lost faith in the Soviet system over the years, and was especially disturbed by the KGB's systematic silencing of dissidents at home and abroad. Faced with tough choices--stay silent, resign, or undermine the system from within--Mitrokhin decided to compile a record of the foreign operations of the KGB. Every day for 12 years, he smuggled notes out of the archive. He started by hiding scraps of paper covered with miniscule handwriting in his shoes, but later wrote notes on ordinary office paper, which he took home in his pockets. He hid the notes under his mattress, and on weekends took them to his dacha, where he typed them and hid them in containers buried under the floor. When he escaped to Britain, his archive contained tens of thousands of pages of notes.

In 1995, Mitrokhin, by then a British citizen, contacted Christopher Andrew (For the President's Eyes Only), head of the faculty of history at Cambridge University and one of the world's foremost historians of international intelligence. Andrew was allowed to examine the archive Mitrokhin created "to ensure that the truth was not forgotten, that posterity might some day come to know of it." The Sword and the Shield is the earthshaking result. The book details the KGB's foreign-intelligence operations, most notably those aimed at Great Britain and the "Main Adversary"--the United States. In the 700-page book, Andrew reveals operations aimed at discrediting high-profile Americans, from Martin Luther King to Ronald Reagan; secret arms caches still hidden--and boobytrapped--throughout the West; disinformation efforts, including forging a letter from Lee Harvey Oswald in an attempt to implicate the CIA in the assassination of JFK; attempts to stir up racial tensions in the U.S. by sending hate mail and even bombs; and the existence of deep-cover agents in North America and Europe--some of whom were effectively "outed" when the book was published.

Mitrokhin's detailed notes are well served by Andrew, who writes forcefully and clearly. The Sword and the Shield represents a remarkable intelligence coup--one that will have serious repercussions for years to come. As Andrew notes, "No one who spied for the Soviet Union at any period between the October Revolution and the eve of the Gorbachev era can now be confident that his or her secrets are still secure." --Sunny Delaney -- Dieser Text bezieht sich auf eine vergriffene oder nicht verfügbare Ausgabe dieses Titels.

Synopsis

The Sword and the Shield is based on one of the most extraordinary intelligence coups of recent times: a secret archive of top-level KGB documents smuggled out of the Soviet Union which the FBI has described, after close examination, as the "most complete and extensive intelligence ever received from any source. " Its presence in the West represents a catastrophic hemorrhage of the KGBs secrets and reveals for the first time the full extent of its worldwide network. Vasili Mitrokhin, a secret dissident who worked in the KGB archive, smuggled out copies of its most highly classified files every day for twelve years. In 1992, a U. S. ally succeeded in exfiltrating the KGB officer and his entire archive out of Moscow. The archive covers the entire period from the Bolshevik Revolution to the 1980s and includes revelations concerning almost every country in the world. But the KGB's main target, of course, was the United States. Though there is top-secret material on almost every country in the world, the United States is at the top of the list. As well as containing many fascinating revelations, this is a major contribution to the secret history of the twentieth century. Among the topics and revelations explored are: * The KGBs covert operations in the United States and throughout the West, some of which remain dangerous today. * KGB files on Oswald and the JFK assassination that Boris Yeltsin almost certainly has no intention of showing President Clinton. * The KGBs attempts to discredit civil rights leader in the 1960s, including its infiltration of the inner circle of a key leader. * The KGBs use of radio intercept posts in New York and Washington, D. C. , in the 1970s to intercept high-level U. S. government communications. * The KGBs attempts to steal technological secrets from major U. S. aerospace and technology corporations. * KGB covert operations against former President Ronald Reagan, which began five years before he became president. * KGB spies who successfully posed as U. S. citizens under a series of ingenious disguises, including several who attained access to the upper echelons of New York society.

In diesem Buch (Mehr dazu)
Einleitungssatz
This book is based on unprecedented and unrestricted access to one of the world's most secret and closely guarded archives-that of the foreign intelligence arm of the KGB, the First Chief Directorate (FCD). Lesen Sie die erste Seite
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Kundenrezensionen

Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen
1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
2.0 von 5 Sternen Mitrokhin's Bona Fides Are Open to Question 27. September 1999
Von Ein Kunde
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe
Students of old-school counterintelligence, as practiced by legendary CIA counterspy chief James Jesus Angleton, should regard this book and its author with arched brows.
Mitrokhin was apparently given his bona fides by the CIA for exposing a KGB mole in the NSA, a fellow named Lipkin. As Lipkin had not had access to US secrets for 25 years, his exposure would have done little to damage SVR ops in the 1990s. The Lipkin revelation seems like classic "chicken feed."
That Mitrokhin exposed a little old lady who passed documents in World War Two, is even less solid proof of his legitimacy. Yet this disclosure has been cited, too, as proof that Mitrokhin is a genuine defector.
In the same way that the CIA has burned, destroyed, or segreated its most sensitive files (e.g., on Project BLUEBIRD, dealing with mind control in the 1960s), so too the KGB has surely dealt with its "family jewels." Thus, the net effect of Mitkrokhin's disclsoures may be to lull Western analysts into believing we now know most of what we need to know about the KGB.
In fact, certain of Mitrokhin's disclsoures raise more questions than they answer. That the KGB tried to frame the CIA for JFK's assassination was argued long ago by Angleton. Mitrokhin's confirmation of this frame-up is welcomed. That Eleanor Roosevelt was brought into the operation, to give conspiracy theorist Mark Lane free publicity, should give pause. That the USSR was ready with the frame-up in its essential details (complete with allegations about the Hunt Brothers) within HOURS of JFK's death, should cause us to take up a deep breath....
Interestingly, Mitrokhin provides no confirmation of the revelations made by an earlier KGB defector, Anatoliy Golitsyn.
Lesen Sie weiter... ›
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?
1.0 von 5 Sternen Dull and over-hyped 19. September 1999
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe
This author purports that this book is loaded with revealing and explosive [my words] material that would cause any agents still alive to be fearful of immediate arrest and prosecution.
I do not think anything could be further from the truth. This book is heavy and boring reading except, perhaps, by the most determined of readers - those with an academic bent.
The prose is stilted and vague. perhaps choppy is a better word; and ultimately lifeless. I am used to very detailed and cumbersome textural material and this ranks among the most unreadable. Every sentence is heavy with acronyms and dangling participles. The real "meat" of the text is bracket by extensive notes and appendicies or transcriptions that do little to elucidate the meaning of the prose.
It is readily apparent that the author did not encounter any of the personages - and Mr. Andrews' analysis of the events, despite his lofty stature as a celebrated historian and author - is unable to portray this nearly 700 page book as anything more than surreal.
I suspect, though I am no expert, that this book will beg rather than answer many questions. fully a third of the actual text is a re-gurgitation of historically known material about the Soviet Union prior to 1939.
Nothing presented by the authors changed either my perception nor general understanding of the facts surrounding the conduct of Soviet internal and external espionage tactics.
Save your money.
Bruce A. Ades, Ph.D.
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?
5.0 von 5 Sternen Full of fascinating details and explosive revelations. 21. September 1999
Von Ein Kunde
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe
I strongly disagree with the bloke from Washington who thinks this book is boring. He must have A.D.D. or simply have lived far too long and seen far too much. "The Sword and the Shield" is full of fascinating details, revelations, entertaining and often slapstick stories, details on disinformation campaigns, and so on, and it covers the whole period from the Revolution right through to the end of the Cold War. There would seem to me enough material here for a full year of news reports. I've been following some of the stories, and it baffles me that no journalists so far have pressed the issue of why the CIA botched it again by turning Mitrokhin away, or why the press and the Clinton administration aren't pressing Yeltsin to come clean on the Oswald files and the arms caches allegedly buried in America. There is so much interesting stuff in here and fodder for on-going investigations. Sure, some of it has long been suspected, but here is confirmation unlike anything we've ever had. Boring? Hardly. This book performs a great service and very few books can boast that!
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?
Von Donald Mitchell TOP 500 REZENSENT
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe
Anyone who is seriously interested in how to conduct government is the most responsible way should read this book. In addition, those who love spy stories, histories, and novels will be rewarded with many new details and perspectives on Soviet and Russian foreign intelligence activities since the Russian Revolution at the beginning of the 20th century.

This book surprised me in several ways. First, I did not expect to learn that the KGB did not have a lot of important successes that were not already known publicly. Second, the KGB's effectiveness was more related to Western mistakes than to KGB brilliance. Third, the Soviet perceptions of the United States and Britain seem to have come from Fantasyland. The Soviet state made very poor use of terrific foreign intelligence because its leaders were such poor thinkers and the system did not encourage free discussion. Fourth, helping the dissidents inside the Soviet Union could have helped undo Communism much sooner.

What makes this book unique is the combination of having had access to almost all of the foreign intelligence archives of the KGB for 12 years and having those archives interpreted by someone in the KGB who was interested in the need to reform Soviet socialism. By having Christpher Andrew join Vasili Mitrokhin in authoring this book, you do get a Western overlay but the fundamental Russian perspective is still there.

I found the "big picture" aspects of the book far more rewarding than the specific examples. The rise of fascism clearly was Moscow's greatest resource in getting information from the West. The most effective spies (like Kim Philby and the other Magnficent Five in Britain) were as much motivated by anti-fascism as they were by helping the U.S.S.R.
Lesen Sie weiter... ›
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Die neuesten Kundenrezensionen
4.0 von 5 Sternen It's All There
While not everything in the book is news, the fact that virtually ALL the names (minor and major), dates and actions since 1917 are present makes this book a very valuable treasure... Lesen Sie weiter...
Veröffentlicht am 5. Juli 2000 von Chris
4.0 von 5 Sternen A Fascinating Look Behind The Closed Doors of the KGB!
From this book we learn of one of the most incredible stories to yet emerge from the history of the Cold War; the tale of this Russian defector who had laboriously hand-scribed an... Lesen Sie weiter...
Veröffentlicht am 29. Juni 2000 von Barron Laycock
4.0 von 5 Sternen Don't make this the first book you read on the topic...
This is a large body of work containing an enormous amount of information. The reason for the 4 stars is that I just don't feel that all the information from the KGB files can be... Lesen Sie weiter...
Veröffentlicht am 28. Juni 2000 von taking a rest
4.0 von 5 Sternen Slow, dry, and detailed - but in a good way...
What struck me most about this book was not the extensiveness of the KGB's operations, but the ineptitude with which they seemed to pursue them. Lesen Sie weiter...
Veröffentlicht am 3. Juni 2000 von George Jong
2.0 von 5 Sternen Better read than heard
A lot of detail, and all of it good information. Unfortunately it should not be presented in audio format without a rewrite. Lesen Sie weiter...
Am 12. Mai 2000 veröffentlicht
3.0 von 5 Sternen Better as a reference book
The whole issue with this book is one of readability. It is stuffed full of names, places and dates but the way the actual events are portrayed makes it a challenge for the reader... Lesen Sie weiter...
Veröffentlicht am 5. Mai 2000 von Rick Ollerman
2.0 von 5 Sternen A book only a historian could love
Though I am interested in geopolitics, this is not an easy read. The sheer weight of names, faces, events tends to drag one down. Lesen Sie weiter...
Veröffentlicht am 8. Februar 2000 von Peter Bistolarides
4.0 von 5 Sternen Essential reading on KGB history
Those of us interesting in a more complete telling of the history of Soviet intelligence operations -- and, for that matter, the history of the USSR -- can do no wrong than to read... Lesen Sie weiter...
Veröffentlicht am 7. Februar 2000 von Robert S. Delaney
4.0 von 5 Sternen Interesting
A well documented piece, tends to be repetative and tedious in places. I enjoyed it greatly and most importantly learned a lot about the former Soviet Union's mind set towards the... Lesen Sie weiter...
Veröffentlicht am 1. Februar 2000 von John Seybold
4.0 von 5 Sternen Good look at KGB, but . . .
This book is essential reading for those who want to learn about the strange world of international espionage. Lesen Sie weiter...
Am 25. Januar 2000 veröffentlicht
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