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The Social Construction of Reality: A Treatise in the Sociology of Knowledge [Englisch] [Taschenbuch]

Peter L. Berger , Thomas Luckmann
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Kurzbeschreibung

11. Juli 1967
This book reformulates the sociological  subdiscipline known as the sociology of knowledge.  Knowledge is presented as more than ideology, including as  well false consciousness, propaganda, science and  art.

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Produktinformation

  • Taschenbuch: 240 Seiten
  • Verlag: Anchor (11. Juli 1967)
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ISBN-10: 0385058985
  • ISBN-13: 978-0385058988
  • Größe und/oder Gewicht: 20,8 x 13,2 x 1,3 cm
  • Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung: 5.0 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (2 Kundenrezensionen)
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: Nr. 71.862 in Fremdsprachige Bücher (Siehe Top 100 in Fremdsprachige Bücher)
  • Komplettes Inhaltsverzeichnis ansehen

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Produktbeschreibungen

Pressestimmen

"... A major breakthrough in the  sociology of knowledge." -- American  Sociological Review.

Synopsis

A general and systematic account of the role of knowledge in society aimed to stimulate both critical discussion and empirical investigations. This book is concerned with the sociology of 'everything that passes for knowledge in society'. It focuses particularly on that 'common-sense knowledge' which constitutes the reality of everyday life for the ordinary member of society. The authors are concerned to present an analysis of knowledge in everyday life in the context of a theory of society as a dialectical process between objective and subjective reality. Their development of a theory of institutions, legitimations and socializations has implications beyond the discipline of sociology, and their 'humanistic' approach has considerable relevance for other social scientists, historians, philosophers and anthropologists. -- Dieser Text bezieht sich auf eine andere Ausgabe: Taschenbuch .

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Einleitungssatz
Since our purpose in this treatise is a sociological analysis of the reality of everyday life, more precisely, of knowledge that guides conduct in everyday life, and we are only tangentially interested in how this reality may appear in various theoretical  Lesen Sie die erste Seite
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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Solid...fascinating...an overlooked classic. 9. September 1997
Format:Taschenbuch
I enjoy these dense books of ideas, but rarely come away from them as fulfilled and enlightened as I came away from this one. Building on the premise that most (if not all)of the knowledge we have, both objective and subjective, comes from the society we live in, the authors examine how knowledge forms and how it is maintained and modified by the institutions that embody it and individuals who embrace it. It gives a scientific grounding to the symbiotic relationship between an individual and his or her community. The book is scholarly, but accessable, with frequent commonplace examples to shed light on the ideas. And it is delightfully brief and to the point, with laudably little of philosophical tedium and academic backbiting that often weighs down such works
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5.0 von 5 Sternen Excellent - thorough and well-focused 10. Juli 1998
Format:Taschenbuch
I am surprised that a book this old and this thought-provoking isn't more widely-known and cited in discussions concerning the world of thought and ideas. After reading it, I'm tempted to describe it as "this is where the universe begins" because for all practical purposes, it does! Berger and Luckman are very successful at presenting a scholarly account on the theory of knowledge in a (relatively) easy to comprehend and digest manner. Anyone who's read Pirsig's "Lila" and "Zen and the Art of Motorcyle Maintenance" will find this work just as interesting *and* an easier read!
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5.0 von 5 Sternen What You Know Depends on Where You Sit 28. August 2003
Von Wayne C. Lusvardi - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch
The Social Construction of Reality: A Treatise in the Sociology of Knowledge is one of the most significant books of social science ever written - ranking with and beyond Thomas Kuhn's The Structure of Scientific Revolutions, Max Weber's The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism, Emile Durkheim's Suicide, and more recently Walter Truett Anderson's more popularized take off of it entitled Reality Isn't What It Use To Be (1990). It has spawned a whole new cross-disciplinary school of social science - social constructionism. Originally written in 1967, the book was way ahead of its time with what now is called "postmodernism;" although neither of the author's views necessarily fit this term. In the arts and humanities, it resonates with the philosophy of 17th century Italian philosopher Giambatista Vico's book New Science ("the true and the made are convertible"), with the plays of Italian Luigi Pirandello (Right You Are If You Say You Are and Six Stories in Search of an Author), and with novelists Fyodor Dostoevsky (The Divine Inquisitor) and Robert Musil (A Man Without Qualities).
The sociology of knowledge a la Berger and Luckmann is not about the history of ideas, the economic origin of ideologies, the social process of education, the study of intellectuals, religious Gnostics, or secret societies, or social theories per se. Rather, the intriguing concern of the authors is what they call everyday knowledge or common sense knowledge that is constructed at different levels of society all the way from language, to family history and memories, to children's folk tales, proverbs, and legends, to workplace and professional ideologies, to formal theories and paradigms, and finally to what they call symbolic universes or over-arching world views. Again, this is reminiscent of Vico who wrote: "common sense is judgment without reflection, shared by an entire class, an entire nation, or the entire human race." To Berger and Luckmann reality (that which we can't wish away) is unknowable except through the prism of experience as interpreted through social enclaves or what they call plausibility structures.
Berger and Luckmann base their work on a set of fundamental propositions: (1) Man's consciousness is determined by his social being or by his "seat in life." (2) Knowledge must always be from a certain position or social location. (3) "What is truth on one side of the Pyrenees (mountains) is error on the other" (Blaise Pascal). (4) Consider social facts or institutions as things (Emile Durkheim). And (5) the sociology of knowledge must concern itself with everything that passes for knowledge in society.
Berger and Luckmann proceed from these propositions to discuss society as objective reality and society as subjective reality. They discuss three self-validating "moments" that construct our knowledge of reality: (1) externalization or projection (society as a human product); (2) objectivation or reification (society as objective reality); and (3) internalization and role alternation (man is a social product). The authors maintain that social institutions are perpetually precarious because they are humanly constructed, not biologically given. Human culture, produced by institutions, replaces instincts so well that culture is taken for granted as the same as our physical nature. As Berger and Luckmann put it: "man's relationship to his environment is characterized by world-openness." The authors don't mean that man is plastic, but that he is moldable within unspecific biological constraints.
Berger and Luckmann synthesize the views of a wide range of philosophers and social thinkers into an original product, in true constructionist fashion. But their systematic "theory" is not totalistic or totalitarian as is the theoretical systems of psychoanalyst Sigmund Freud, revolutionary thinker Karl Marx, the theory of evolution of Charles Darwin, or any other "know it all" system. Their approach reminds one of the classic parable of the Blind Men and the Elephant. Each blind man finds that they are touching or experiencing different parts of the body of the elephant and thus are led to think that the elephant is thin like a tail, or flexible like the trunk, or round and solid like its leg, or immovable like its torso. Only with Berger and Luckmann's approach the blind men may find that the elephant is hollow or man-made as in the fictional character of the wizard in the children's story of the Wizard of Oz. To Berger and Luckmann the world is a Hollywood stage front, a Russian Potemkin Village, but not a delusion. The authors explain that the next generation forgets, or is led to believe, that the social world is given when it was produced or manufactured. But it isn't manufactured mechanistically but is dialectically or interactively produced. The social order can be maintained by various techniques including intimidation, propaganda, mystification, or the manipulation of symbols (symbolic action). However, man is not a passive, but a reactionary creature that will not merely swallow social reality whole but will also often try and alter it. As the authors state man produces society, society becomes an objective, coercive, and reified (as in deified) reality, and, in turn, man becomes a social product of his own creation. Man experiences alienation when he forgets he created society or when he is powerless to control what he created. Man experiences what is called anomie when social worldviews no longer reflect reality.
Berger and Luckmann's book is highly readable but the terminology may be foreign at first and thus intimidating for some. If one wants to read a popularized version, Walter Truett Anderson's Reality Isn't What It Used to Be may leave one thirsting to read Berger and Luckmann's seminal book as well. Other books to explore might be Jodi O'Brien and Peter Kollock, The Production of Reality; William G. Roy, Making Societies; Walter Truett Anderson's sequel The Truth About the Truth; and Peter Berger's book on the social construction of sacred religious knowledge entitled The Sacred Canopy. And for a "light" introduction one might read Peter Berger's other classic entitled An Invitation to Sociology. But if you like reading a book that has depth of thought and classic understandings, don't miss reading Berger and Luckmann's The Social Construction of Reality first hand.
53 von 57 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Solid...fascinating...an overlooked classic. 9. September 1997
Von Dan Jackson - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch
I enjoy these dense books of ideas, but rarely come away from them as fulfilled and enlightened as I came away from this one. Building on the premise that most (if not all)of the knowledge we have, both objective and subjective, comes from the society we live in, the authors examine how knowledge forms and how it is maintained and modified by the institutions that embody it and individuals who embrace it. It gives a scientific grounding to the symbiotic relationship between an individual and his or her community. The book is scholarly, but accessable, with frequent commonplace examples to shed light on the ideas. And it is delightfully brief and to the point, with laudably little of philosophical tedium and academic backbiting that often weighs down such works
69 von 78 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Not for Intellectual Weaklings 21. November 2003
Von wildbill - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch
This is the second most influential book I have ever read. It influenced me because It showed me how one could deduce from everyday experience how humans create realities and have faith that their realities are real.
Read this book if you would like to understand what people mean when they tell you that something is socially constructed. Many college students and columnists act like "social construction" is a flaky or absurd contention, but once you read this book and understand what Berger and Luckmann are arguing, you will not be able to disagree with their major points.
Nevertheless, this is not an easy read. You have to think along with the authors, put down the book and ponder their examples, and otherwise participate in the classic.
That's a lot of work, but it will change your life!
42 von 48 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen We need more stars for this one! 27. Februar 2004
Von W. Jamison - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch
I would like to add my voice to those who list this book as among the most important they have read. As for many, this book marked a turning point in my college education. Berger's "Invitation to Sociology" was a required text for my Intro to Soc course but that book led me to Construction. I was a philosophy major and reading about Hegel at the time. The coincidence of reading Hegel and Berger turned on a light for me. They both explained one another. Hegel was laying much of the ground work (and there are lots of excellent books that explain why that is) but Hegel is notoriously difficult. Berger's contemporary vocabulary opened my eyes to a successful interpretation of Hegel. Reading Berger was contemporary English instead of translated early 19th century German. At least it was contemporary for me at the time (early 70s). Today there are many phrases students will recognize as politically incorrect -- Berger was writing for a male academic audience. This is a shame since students do find it difficult and the additional discovery of sexist language adds insult to what may very well be viewed as injury. This book will enter a student into reflective thinking stage 6 and so causes all the depressing introspection that will go with that among the bright students. Which brings up a dilemma. Hegel was very positive. Rorty suggests that what he did was replace knowledge with hope. Agreed! While Berger is not clearly negative, there is no positive emphasis. As a result I always feel an obligation to encourage a positive approach to the powerfulness of this world view.
My collection of Berger books occupies a highly esteemed shelf in my library.
20 von 21 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen still suitable for people who hate hard-to-read books 9. Juni 2005
Von Colin Stahl - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch|Verifizierter Kauf
I've always been passionately against books that are written in the most dry and academic manner, so I was a bit scared of this book to begin with, but it proved to be a thoroughly enjoyable (and educational, of course) read. My brain isn't very receptive of books that use lots of big words and fancy ideas, but the authors here have managed to construct this treatise with unbelievable clarity for the what they present, and also very often successfully implement a vein of humor. If you have any of the slightest interest in the topic, don't be scared of how academic and foreboding it may seem to the casual reader, as it is not as bad as it looks and very much so worth the effort!
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