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The Nazi Officer's Wife: How One Jewish Woman Survived The Holocaust [Kindle Edition]

Edith H. Beer , Susan Dworkin
4.5 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (22 Kundenrezensionen)

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Produktbeschreibungen

Pressestimmen

Hahn Beer tells her story with a remarkable lack of rancour ... her evocation of atmosphere and detail is worthy of John le Carre. The book is most moving as a record of individual courage but it also constitutes valuable evidence on the vexed subject of how far ordinary Germans were aware of the evil in their midst THE TIMES All memoirs of this period are worthwhile, but, in this case, doubly so. MORNING STAR

Kurzbeschreibung

Edith Hahn was an outspoken young woman in Vienna when the Gestapo forced her into a ghetto and then into a labor camp. When she returned home months later, she knew she would become a hunted woman and went underground. With the help of a Christian friend, she emerged in Munich as Grete Denner. There she met Werner Vetter, a Nazi Party member who fell in love with her. Despite Edith's protests and even her eventual confession that she was Jewish, he married her and kept her identity a secret.

In wrenching detail, Edith recalls a life of constant, almost paralyzing fear. She tells of German officials who casually questioned the lineage of her parents; of how, when giving birth to her daughter, she refused all painkillers, afraid that in an altered state of mind she might reveal something of her past; and of how, after her husband was captured by the Soviet army, she was bombed out of her house and had to hide while drunken Russian soldiers raped women on the street.

Yet despite the risk it posed to her life, Edith created a remarkable record of survival. She saved every document and set of papers issued to her, as well as photographs she managed to take inside labor camps. Now part of the permanent collection at the Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C., these hundreds of documents, several of which are included in this volume, form the fabric of a gripping new chapter in the history of the Holocaust -- complex, troubling, and ultimately triumphant.


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3 von 3 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen Choices Not Easily Understood 6. Februar 2000
Von Ein Kunde
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe
Only those who have survived the holocaust truly know the real horrors of this twentieth century hell on earth. No matter how much the rest of us learn about this living nightmare, we will never fully comprehend what went on because it will always be second hand. To make judgments about how Jewish people chose to survive seems so wrong. Yet, as I continued to read "The Nazi Officer's Wife," I could not keep from uttering some form of audible shock on certain choices Ms. Hahn made along the way. For example, it was impossible for me to comprehend her determination to stay with Pepi long after it was apparent that he would never emigrate with her or even commit to her and that his "love" for her was a distant second to the loyalty he felt for his mother. I clearly see the necessity of becoming a German's lover and then wife in order to survive, but I can not understand why Edith's pressed to have a child with Werner Vertter in the worst of times. From the moment of conception this baby's life was at risk. Uncertain of her future with a man who did not even know the real Edith Hahn, this writer relates how, after the war, her daughter was baptized. Already knowing then that so many Jewish lives had been lost throughout Europe, did another Jewish identity need to be erased? I wanted to cry when Edith ended her relationship with the orphan, Gretl. If Edith ever tried to keep her "little family" together, she did not relate that in her book. Finally, of course, after all the history and all the passing years, Edith could not stop being in touch with the man who was never there for her. Though I cannot help but be bothered by certain choices Edith Hahn made, I must quickly add that I admire a woman who lived her "lie" so well for so long that she became a survivor.
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Von Patrick
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe
Edith Hahn's story is surprisingly well written for an amateur; she is not self-censoring as far as one can make out. She tells the truth about her family, their life in Vienna where her parents run a restaurant, her happy childhood memories and focus on boys; her irritation with one sister who was self-pitying and unhappy. She is smart as a whip, gets into the law faculty of Vienna's university and almost graduates as one of the top law students - except that the Anschluss arrives before she takes her final exams. Her boyfriend, a "Mischling" (halfJew) is witty and wonderful and a perfect companion, but in the end, he betrays her and favors his gentile mother who lives in fear of the Jews and their coming near her son, after the Jewish father dies. She stays, in fact, well past the point of safe passage out of the Third Reich principally because of him. She winds up on an asparagus farm with other Jewish women doing dreadful and miserable farm work. Next, she's transfered to a cardboard-box factory. She gets out of there by feigning a return to Vienna to join her mother in a mandatory transport to Poland, but on the train she rips off the yellow star and returns to Vienna as an undercover Gentile. She gets false papers from a family friend/doctor, then uses them to get to Munich, where she lives with a family and helps them run a home-based tailoring business. That's how she meets her first husband, a German working in an airplane factory as a painter. She does love him to some extent, but mainly she sees marriage to this rather off-balance traditional man as a way to stay safe during the war. As a hausfrau, she's got the perfect disguise, and they have a child. He is drafted and sent to Russia, winds up in a POW camp in Siberia. Lesen Sie weiter... ›
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5.0 von 5 Sternen An astounding account of terrible times 10. Mai 2000
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe
I'm an 18-year old college student in India.My father had been to London recently where he ran into Ms.Angela at Harrods.Although,it was a chance meeting for him,it was a god-sent gift for me.She encouraged him to read a copy of "The Nazi Officer's Wife" written by her mother,Edith Hahn Beer.Although I must admit that war novels never interested me before,I was proven wrong by this one.
Once I started reading the book,I just couldnt put it down.Here is a simple,straightforward account of a Jewsih woman whose faith in her religion and her strength never let her down inspite of the horrendous perils that she had to face every minute of her life during the World War period.When I try to understand the pain in her heart when she was refused her University Degree,when she had to leave her Mother for the Asparagus fields,when she had nobody to turn to after her relationship with her boyfriend was heading no where,when she had to put on an endless charade amidst the core of the Nazi society,when she had to rely on God's mercy to keep her Jewish identity a secret,when she had to work as a maid in London after being an honoured Judge in Germany.....what can i say,its just unimaginable that this woman managed to survive through all this on her own.
There are so many lessons that this book has taught me.I can never stop admiring Edith Hahn Beer for her unshakeable faith that tomorrow is a better day.One of the most beautiful things I found in this book was the French saying "Life is beautiful and it begins tomorrow".It is so true that very few of us bother to realise its meaning!
And of course,how can I forget to mention how moved I was by this woman's love for her Mother.
Lesen Sie weiter... ›
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Die neuesten Kundenrezensionen
5.0 von 5 Sternen bewegende Geschichte
Das Buch ist sehr spannend und rührend. Ich interessiere mich sehr für die Schicksale der Juden in Nazi-Deutschland und habe auch viele Bücher darüber gelesen. Lesen Sie weiter...
Vor 4 Monaten von Huxley veröffentlicht
5.0 von 5 Sternen A story of survival
This is a captivating story of survival that reached epic proportions that stirred sympathetic emotions in me throughout the read. Lesen Sie weiter...
Veröffentlicht am 9. Juni 2005 von Kemayou
5.0 von 5 Sternen A deeply moving story
Though I consumed this book in a matter of hours, I found it so emotionally affecting that I had to stop and take a deep breath now and then, walk around the block, before I could... Lesen Sie weiter...
Veröffentlicht am 24. Juli 2000 von Kathryn Evans
5.0 von 5 Sternen one woman's survival
This book tells the amazing story of one woman's survival against all odds. Given the subject matter, you might expect the story to be depressing. Lesen Sie weiter...
Am 21. März 2000 veröffentlicht
5.0 von 5 Sternen Important Read
This book is an incredible revelation as to the survival of one young Jewish girl/woman during the Hitler regime. Lesen Sie weiter...
Am 1. März 2000 veröffentlicht
5.0 von 5 Sternen CHOICES OF COURAGE!
Choices of courage are the choices the woman in this book made. This woman did exactly whatever she had to do to remain alive. Lesen Sie weiter...
Am 29. Februar 2000 veröffentlicht
5.0 von 5 Sternen A wonderful book of courage, determination and survival
This book is more interesting than the title suggests. I found myself totally involved in the narrator's struggle to survive Nazi Germany and amazed by her indomitable spirit. Lesen Sie weiter...
Veröffentlicht am 25. Februar 2000 von Y. Leventhal
5.0 von 5 Sternen Compelling
I picked this biography up at Perl Mack Library on Saturday and had read the entire book by Sunday evening. Lesen Sie weiter...
Am 9. Februar 2000 veröffentlicht
5.0 von 5 Sternen A real page-turner!
I could not really believe the dust jacket when I read it. But, then, I read the book. I could not put it down. Good narrative style, and such an interesting story.
Veröffentlicht am 21. Januar 2000 von meiringen
3.0 von 5 Sternen The Nazi Officers Wife
Informative book on the plight of the Jewish people but I felt that they should have defined the value of the currency at that time more accurately. Lesen Sie weiter...
Am 6. Januar 2000 veröffentlicht
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