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The Names (Sun Tracks: An American Indian Literary) (Englisch) Taschenbuch – November 1987

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Produktinformation

  • Taschenbuch: 170 Seiten
  • Verlag: Univ of Arizona Pr; Auflage: Reprint (November 1987)
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ISBN-10: 0816510466
  • ISBN-13: 978-0816510467
  • Größe und/oder Gewicht: 14 x 2 x 21,6 cm
  • Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung: 5.0 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (2 Kundenrezensionen)
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: Nr. 237.925 in Fremdsprachige Bücher (Siehe Top 100 in Fremdsprachige Bücher)

Mehr über den Autor

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Produktbeschreibungen

Pressestimmen

"It is a search and a celebration, a book of identities and sources....Out of ordinary materials—genealogy, tribal tales, memories of a boyhood spent in Oklahoma, at Ship Rock in the Navajo country and at the Jemez pueblo, where his parents taught school—he has built a mystical, provocative book." —Wallace Stegner, New York Times"A Native American version of 'Roots' . . . full of the sense of wonder that characterizes classic American literature." —Choice"Graceful, lucid prose...[Momaday] is forever an Indian and the reader understands why." —Atlantic Monthly"With the eye of a painter and the voice of a poet, Momaday vividly recreates a childhood world of color, sound, and experience played out against the backdrop of tribal tales and in the shadow of revered forebears. . . . An eloquent statement of this distinguished Native American author's search for identity." —Journal of Arizona History

Über den Autor und weitere Mitwirkende

A preeminent practitioner of twentieth century literature, N. Scott Momaday is perhaps best known for having blazed a trail for contemporary Native American writers. A Pulitzer Prize winner and member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, Momaday in many respects is a class unto himself. Momaday is Regents Professor of English at the University of Arizona. A popular speaker, he narrated the PBS series The West.

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Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen

Format: Taschenbuch
N. Scott Momaday's beautifully written memoir of childhood in Jemez Pueblo, NM is geographically as well as chronologically defined, incorporating "the empty spaces of time in the morning and afternoon," the wide blue New Mexico sky, and the undeveloped high desert into the narrative as Momaday searches the landscape of his memory for the key word or image, _the name_ for things, that will retrieve the entirety of his history. Retrieval of this complex history, of emotion and memory, "the vibrant ecstasy of so much being," is almost possible. "Again and again, I have come to that awful edge, that one word, perhaps, that I cannot bring from my mouth."

_The Names_ is moving in its description of the ceremonies of Jemez Pueblo and the stories of Momaday's family. The author writes sometimes in a child's voice and sometimes in his grandfather's or the voices of others around him. It is clearly a child's story, saturated with a child's sense of wonder. But Momaday also provides an account of the process of attempted recovery, the descent into storytelling: "The first word gives origin to the second, the first and second to the third, . . . and so on. You cannot begin with the second word and tell the story, for the telling of the story is a cumulative process, a chain of becoming, at last of being."

Momaday's exploration of language's structure and limitations makes much of the book beautiful to me, but gets weighted down in intellectualization from time to time. Scott Momaday is a scholar -- he went to Stanford -- and the analytical aspect of _The Names_ can be a bit dry at times. It is, on the whole though, a sensitive and moving exploration of a Native American childhood and one of my favorite male autobiographies.
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Von Ein Kunde am 18. Januar 1997
Format: Taschenbuch
That's how I think of this book - a photo album of old family photos with one long letter (or, perhaps it would be better described as a series of short notes written by someone trying to remember what they'd seen, heard, imagines, or discovered). It's a fun book to read straight through, or to flip around in, going back and forth through the photos and reading about the person whose face or photo catches your eye <g>. For info on articles & stuff written about this book visit:
[...]
Kommentar War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein Feedback senden...
Vielen Dank für Ihr Feedback. Wenn diese Rezension unangemessen ist, informieren Sie uns bitte darüber.
Wir konnten Ihre Stimmabgabe leider nicht speichern. Bitte erneut versuchen

Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen auf Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 7 Rezensionen
21 von 22 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Beautifully written account of a childhood on Jemez Pueblo. 7. Mai 1997
Von Ein Kunde - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch
N. Scott Momaday's beautifully written memoir of childhood in Jemez Pueblo, NM is geographically as well as chronologically defined, incorporating "the empty spaces of time in the morning and afternoon," the wide blue New Mexico sky, and the undeveloped high desert into the narrative as Momaday searches the landscape of his memory for the key word or image, _the name_ for things, that will retrieve the entirety of his history. Retrieval of this complex history, of emotion and memory, "the vibrant ecstasy of so much being," is almost possible. "Again and again, I have come to that awful edge, that one word, perhaps, that I cannot bring from my mouth."
_The Names_ is moving in its description of the ceremonies of Jemez Pueblo and the stories of Momaday's family. The author writes sometimes in a child's voice and sometimes in his grandfather's or the voices of others around him. It is clearly a child's story, saturated with a child's sense of wonder. But Momaday also provides an account of the process of attempted recovery, the descent into storytelling: "The first word gives origin to the second, the first and second to the third, . . . and so on. You cannot begin with the second word and tell the story, for the telling of the story is a cumulative process, a chain of becoming, at last of being."

Momaday's exploration of language's structure and limitations makes much of the book beautiful to me, but gets weighted down in intellectualization from time to time. Scott Momaday is a scholar -- he went to Stanford -- and the analytical aspect of _The Names_ can be a bit dry at times. It is, on the whole though, a sensitive and moving exploration of a Native American childhood and one of my favorite male autobiographies.
8 von 10 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
A Photo album and long letter... 18. Januar 1997
Von Ein Kunde - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch
That's how I think of this book - a photo album of old family photos with one long letter (or, perhaps it would be better described as a series of short notes written by someone trying to remember what they'd seen, heard, imagines, or discovered). It's a fun book to read straight through, or to flip around in, going back and forth through the photos and reading about the person whose face or photo catches your eye <g>. For info on articles & stuff written about this book visit:
[...]
1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
If you love the Southwest...... 21. März 2011
Von Barbara W. Apoian - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe Verifizierter Kauf
If you love the Southwest, you will love this book. Momaday writes about the landscape like no other writer. He captures the immensity and color of that vast area. His other books "House made of Dawn" and "Rainy Mountain" are equally moving. I keep them handy at all times, just to read certain passages of transcendant imagery.
Great Book! 3. Juni 2014
Von Susan L. Stone - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch Verifizierter Kauf
This book is both a family history and memoir. The author gives insight into who he is, and into the life of native Americans. I really enjoyed this.
3 von 5 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
the name a memoir 6. Dezember 2002
Von Ein Kunde - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch
the book was great in detail and very touching.
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