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The Modern Web: Multi-Device Web Development with HTML5, CSS3, and JavaScript
 
 

The Modern Web: Multi-Device Web Development with HTML5, CSS3, and JavaScript [Kindle Edition]

Peter Gasston

Kindle-Preis: EUR 14,88 Inkl. MwSt. und kostenloser drahtloser Lieferung über Amazon Whispernet

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Kurzbeschreibung

A Guide to Modern Web Development

Today's web technologies are evolving at near-light speed, bringing the promise of a seamless Internet ever closer to reality. When users can browse the Web on a three-inch phone screen as easily as on a fifty-inch HDTV, what's a developer to do?

Peter Gasston's The Modern Web will guide you through the latest and most important tools of device-agnostic web development, including HTML5, CSS3, and JavaScript. His plain-English explanations and practical examples emphasize the techniques, principles, and practices that you'll need to easily transcend individual browser quirks and stay relevant as these technologies are updated.

Learn how to:

  • Plan your content so that it displays fluidly across multiple devices
  • Design websites to interact with devices using the most up-to-date APIs, including Geolocation, Orientation, and Web Storage
  • Incorporate cross-platform audio and video without using troublesome plug-ins
  • Make images and graphics scalable on high-resolution devices with SVG
  • Use powerful HTML5 elements to design better forms

Turn outdated websites into flexible, user-friendly ones that take full advantage of the unique capabilities of any device or browser. With the help of The Modern Web, you'll be ready to navigate the front lines of device-independent development.

Über den Autor und weitere Mitwirkende

Peter Gasston has been a web developer for more than 12 years in both agency and corporate settings. The author of The Book of CSS3, Gasston has also been published in Smashing Magazine, A List Apart, and .net magazine. He runs the web development blog Broken Links (http://broken-links.com/) and lives in London, England.

Produktinformation

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • Dateigröße: 3076 KB
  • Seitenzahl der Print-Ausgabe: 264 Seiten
  • Gleichzeitige Verwendung von Geräten: Keine Einschränkung
  • Verlag: No Starch Press; Auflage: 1 (22. April 2013)
  • Verkauf durch: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ASIN: B00CFS5V3Q
  • Text-to-Speech (Vorlesemodus): Aktiviert
  • X-Ray:
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: #120.613 Bezahlt in Kindle-Shop (Siehe Top 100 Bezahlt in Kindle-Shop)

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Amazon.com: 4.6 von 5 Sternen  28 Rezensionen
16 von 18 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Great overview 30. April 2013
Von teknohippie - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch
This book is a great introductory text for the novice and experienced programmer alike. It guides the reader through the tangle of mainstream and upcoming technologies that is the modern web, with just enough of a sprinkling of humor to make for an enjoyable read.

It offers a good balance between providing an overview and incorporating important practical details, and the author clearly understands his craft. Although not thick enough to be a serious reference text for any one of the technologies it covers, there is nevertheless sufficient information to get started with each of them. Definitely worth reading even if you already somewhat familiar with HTML5, CSS3, and JavaScript.
8 von 8 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Web Developers and Software Testers Rejoice 15. Februar 2014
Von Michael Larsen - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition
The web has become a rather fragmented beast these past twenty some odd years. Once upon a time, it was simple. Well. relatively simple. Three-tiered architecture was the norm, HTML was blocking, some frames could make for structure, and a handful of CGI scripts would give you some interactivity. Add a little JavaScript for eye candy and you were good.

Now? there’s a different flavor of web framework for any given day of the week, and then some. JavaScript has grown to the point where we don’t even really talk about it, unless it’s to refer to the particular library we are using (jQuery? Backbone? Ember? Angular? All of the above?). CSS and HTML have blended, and the simple structure of old has given way to a myriad of tagging, style references, script references, and other techniques to manage the miss-mash of parts that make up what you see on your screen. Oh yeah, lest we forget “what you see on your screen” has also taken on a whole new meaning. It used to mean computer screen. Now it’s computer, tablet, embedded screen, mobile phone, and a variety of other devices with sizes and shapes we were only dreaming about two decades ago.

Imagine yourself a person wanting to create a site today. I don’t mean going to one of those all-in-one site hosting shops and turning the crank on their template library (though there’s nothing wrong with that), I mean “start from bare teal, roll your own, make a site from scratch” kind of things. With the dizzying array of options out there, what’s an aspiring web developer to do?

Peter Gasston (author of "The Book of CSS3”) has effectively asked the same questions, and his answer is “The Modern Web”. Peter starts with the premise that the days of making a site for just the desktop are long gone. Any site that doesn’t consider mobile as an alternate platform (and truth be told, for many people, their only platform) they’re going to miss out on a lot of people. therefore, the multi platform ideal (device agnostic) is set up front and explanations of options available take that mobile-inclusive model into account. Each chapter looks at a broad array of possible options and available tools, and provides a survey of what they can do. Each chapter ends with a Further Reading section that will take you to a variety of sites and reference points to help you wrap your head around all of these details.

So what does “The Modern Web” have to say for itself?

Chapter 1 describes the Web Platform, sets the stage, and talks a bit about the realities that have led us to what I described in the opening paragraphs. It’s a primer for the ideas that will be covered in the rest of the book. Gasston encourages the idea of the "web platform” and that it contains all of the building blocks to be covered, including HTML5, CSS3 and JavaScript. It also encourages the user to keep up to date in the developments of browsers, what they are doing, what they are not doing, and what they have stopped doing. Gasston also says “test, test, and then test again”, which is a message I can wholeheartedly appreciate.

Chapter 2 is about Structure and Semantics, or to put a finer point on it, the semantic differences available now to structure documents using HTML5. One of them has become a steady companion of late, and that’s Web Accessibility Initiatives Accessible Rich Internet Applications or WAI-ARIA (usually shortened to ARIA by yours truly). If you have ever wanted to understand Accessibility and the broader 508 standard, and what you an do to get a greater appreciation of what to do to enable this, ARIA tags are a must. The ability to segment the structure of documents based on content and platform means that we spend less time trying to shoehorn our sites into specific platforms, but rather make a ubiquitous platform that can be accessed depending on the device, and create the content to reside in that framework.

Chapter 3 talks about Device Responsive CSS, and at the heart of that is the ability to perform “media queries” what that means is, “tell me what device I am on, and I’ll tell you the best way to display the data.” This is a mostly theoretical chapter, showing what could happen with a variety of devices and leveraging options like Mobile first design.

Chapter 4 discusses New Approaches to CSS Layouts, including how to set up multi column layouts, taking a look at the Flexbox tool, and the way it structures content, and leveraging the Grid layout so familiar to professional print publishing (defining what’s a space, where the space is, and how to allocate content to a particular space).

Chapter 5 brings us to the current (as of the book writing) state of JavaScript, and that today’s JavaScript has exploded with available libraries (Burgess uses the term “Cambrian” to describe the proliferation and fragmentation of JavaScript libraries and capabilities). Libraries can be immensely useful, but be warned, they often come at a price, typically in the performance of your site or app. However, there is a benefit to having a lot of capabilities and features that can be referenced under one roof.

Chapter 6 covers device API’s that are now available to web developers thanks to HTML5, etc. Options such as Geolocation, utilizing Web storage, using utilities like drag and drop, accessing the devices camera and manipulating the images captured, connecting to external sites and apps, etc. Again, this is a broad survey, not a detailed breakdown. Explore the further reading if any of these items is interesting to you.

Chapter 7 looks at Images and Graphics, specifically Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG) and the canvas option in HTML5. While JPEG’s, PNG’s and GIF’s are certainly still used, these newer techniques allow for the ability to draw vector and bitmap graphics dynamically. Each has their uses, along with some sample code snippets to demonstrate them in action.

Chapter 8 is dedicated to forms, more to the point, it is dedicated to the ways that forms can take advantage of the new HTML5 options to help drive rich web applications. A variety of new input options exist to leverage phone and tablet interfaces, where the input type (search box, URL, phone number, etc.) determines in advance what input options are needed and what to display to the user. The ability to auto-display choices to a user based on a data list is shown, as are a variety of input options, such as sliders for numerical values, spin-wheels for choosing dates, and other aspects familiar to mobile users can now be called by assigning their attributes to forms and applications. One of the nicer HTML5 options related to forms is that we can now create client side form validation, whereas before we needed to rely on secondary JavaScript, now it’s just part of the form field declarations (cool!).

Chapter 9 looks at how HTML5 handles multimedia directly using the audio and video tags, and the options to allow the user to display a variety of players, controls and options, as well as to utilize a variety of audio and video formats. Options like subtitles can be added, as well as captioned displayed at key points (think of those little pop-ups in YouTube, etc. yep, those). There are several formats, and of course, not all are compatible with all browsers, to the ability to pick and choose, or use a system’s default, adds to the robustness of the options (and also adds to the complexity of providing video and audio data native via the browser).

Chapter 10 looks at the difference between a general web and mobile site, and the processes used to package a true “web app” that can be accessed and downloaded from a web marketplace like Google Store. In addition, options like Phonegap, which allows for a greater level of integration with a particular device, and AppCache, which lets a user store data on their device so they can user the app offline, get some coverage and examples.

Chapter 11 can be seen as an Epilogue to the book as a whole, in that it is a look to the future and some areas that are still baking, but may well become available in the not too distant future. Web Components, which allows for blocks to be reused and enhanced, while being in a protected space from standards CSS and JavaScript. CSS is also undergoing tome changes, with regions and exclusions allowing more customizable layout options. A lot of this is still in the works, but some of it is available now. Check the Further Reading sections to see what and how far along.

The book ends with two appendices. Appendix A covers Browser support for each of the sections in the book, while Appendix B is a gathering of chapter by chapter Further reading links and sources.

Bottom Line:

The so called Modern Web is a miss mash of technologies, standards, practices and options that overlap and cover a lot of areas. There is a lot of detail crammed into this one book, and there’s a fair amount of tinkering to be done to see what works and how. Each section has a variety of examples and ways to see just what the page/site/app is doing. For the web developer who already has a handle on these technologies, this will be a good reference style book to examine and look for further details in the Further Reading (really, there’s a lot of “Further Reading that can be done!).

The beginning Web Programmer may feel a bit lost in some of this, but with time, and practice with each option, it feels more comfortable. It’s not meant to be a HowTo book, but more of a survey course, with some specific examples spelled out here and there. I do think this book has a special niche that can benefit from it directly, and I’m lucky to be part of that group. Software Testers, if you’d like a book that covers a wide array of “futuristic” web tech, the positives and negatives, and the potential pitfalls that would be of great value to a software tester, this is a wonderful addition to your library. It’s certainly been a nice addition to mine :).
7 von 7 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Just What I Needed 14. Mai 2013
Von Steven H. Clason - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch
As the pace of change in the Web domain keeps accelerating, working Web developers, all of us but especially freelancers, struggle with finding the time to: 1) work; and 2) not get too far behind the technology curve.
This book was written to help with that struggle:

"[T]his book is a snapshot of current, new, and near-future features in HTML, CSS, JavaScript, and related technologies, with a bias toward those that are best for building sites in the multi-device world."

The book begins by describing stuff that's in a fairly advanced state of deployment, for example, elements introduced in HTML5 and WAI-ARIA properties, then moves through the spectrum to things not quite loose in the wild yet, like Web Components and CSS Variables. The author assumes some proficiency with Web technologies, sparing the busy reader long introductory explanations.

You will get a lot out of this book -- in fact, I think you will get the most out of it -- by first reading it through without concerning yourself too much with the plentiful code samples and implementation details. You're unlikely to encounter a more articulate and engaging mid-level overview of the future of the Web platform anywhere, and the opportunity to gain a sense of how it all meshes by a quick read-through should be seized. You can re-read what is most timely for your current project, and then follow the links to further reading for more detailed and up-to-date information.

There is a good bibliography and suggestions for further reading appended to each chapter, and the references are gathered together again near the end of the book.

I found a lot in this book that I knew about, and more that I had never heard of, and came away with some confidence that I know where the technology is heading. I highly recommend this book for working Web developers.
4 von 4 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Good intermediate level book for multi-device development. 3. Oktober 2013
Von R. Parthasarathy - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition
"The Modern Web" is a technical introduction and fairly crisp deep dive into the latest multi-device web development technologies. The author focuses on the core technologies and highlights how it can be different between devices. He offers helpful suggestions and guidance towards how to ensure the content is consistent across multiple platforms and devices.

I am relatively new to web development technologies. I wrote basic HTML long long ago and some CSS when I redesigned my website. Nothing much beyond that. I approached this book with some interest and caution. Interest because it promised a fairly quick (264 pages including quite a bit of sample code) introduction on the topics. Caution because its blurb tossed out a whole bunch of new terminology I had been hearing about but never knew much beyond that. I have made my way through the book and I am happy to say I am better off after.

The author offers a brief introduction to the current state of web technologies and proliferation of devices and jumps into the problem at hand. The first section is about html5 and what it promises over and beyond the original html. The next two chapters offers a perspective on CSS as it has evolved for different screens. It also introduces new CSS frameworks and layouts. The author's predisposition for code samples is evident from the start. Each chapter is rich in code snippets and tags as required. The appendix for each chapter offers helpful links and resources if the reader wants to expand on a specific topic introduced in the chapter. The following chapter is all about the new Javascript. I call it new because it is significantly different from the one a few years ago. The new Javascript based frameworks have made it simpler to build complex websites but without the right toolset, things can appear daunting. The author briefly talks about the most popular Javascript frameworks, most notably jQuery.

Chapter 6 is all about how to handle device specific API's for things like location services, sensor based activities, and so on. Chapter 7 is dedicated to handling images and graphics- a sorely needed one at that. Appropriately sized and formatted images that adjust to varying screen sizes and resolutions are a must in today's world. This Chapter gets the reader started on that path. Chapter 8 is all about Web Forms and Chapter 9 deals with multimedia and the dizzying array of media formats and elements that populate today's websites and devices.

The next chapter is for those who are interested in building web apps instead of native applications tailored to the device under consideration. This is its own big argument but for the purpose of the book, the author gives a succinct introduction to the world of Web Apps and how the developer can go about building one. The final chapter talks about the upcoming advances in all the areas discussed in the book and how certain core techniques will come handy irrespective of where things go from here.

One piece of advice for anyone considering this book. The book gets pretty technical pretty quickly. This is a boon and a bane. For someone looking at a non-technical introduction to the topic and technologies, this is not the right book. It is very much for an intermediate reader with some exposure to programming- minimal html, CSS and Javascript. With the right background, the book shines and offers great value in a small package.
4 von 5 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Covers a Massive Spectrum of New Features 8. Oktober 2013
Von Susanne Cardwell - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch
The Modern Web by Peter Gasston is a state-of-the-art book that demonstrates the latest trends in HTML5, CSS3, and Javascript, aimed at modern browsers and multiple devices. Gasston outshines the market with his less than 250 page book that covers a large--more like massive-- spectrum of new features and includes an exciting chapter on publishing Web and hybrid apps for sale on various online sites.

It is important to note that the book is geared for advanced beginner to advanced designers/programmers and should be tackled after having reasonable background in Javascript. (A recommended Javascript resource for beginners (after reading HTML5 and CSS3) is John Pollock's Beginner Javascript book.)

One of Gasston's most riveting discussions is on features that are making the Web competitive with print, including a feature called "regions" (p. 200), which streams text and data through multiple columns that don't need to be in the natural flow of the Dom (so, in other words, it can stream from a div at the top of the page to one on the bottom right to the top right--not confined to a linear, sequential order).

Also, new and exciting for making the Web at least on par with print is the "exclusion" feature (p. 202), which takes an absolutely positioned element in a relatively positioned parent, and has the text and data of the relatively positioned parent both detect the absolutely positioned element and flow around it in a variety of optional ways.

Also exciting, on the horizon, is the matter of taking a div and giving it shape, such as circular, elliptical, and a customizable polygonal shapes.

Although I don't quite comprehend the overall implications of encapsulation as a concept, Gasston dedicates time on showing a means of creating tailor-made widgets (where widgets include things like carousels, accordions, and date pickers) that could be reused across many documents without interfering with the page's CSS and Javascript and without causing either leaking or inheritance (p. 198). Decorators (that rely on CSS), custom elements (that rely on html), and the shadow dom (that rely on javascript) each provide similar ways to achieve encapsulation of data (where the application component is separated from the DOM), removing the content from the DOM, but having it available for implementation when needed.

With that stated, Gasston covers an enormous range of material, from new form text fields (which include tel, search, email, and url) (p. 143) to the new progress and meter elements (p. 151), to new form input types (which include time, week, datetime, month, date (widget), number (with up and down arrows), range (with a slider widget), color, and datetime-local) (pp. 148-150).

Gasston also features new media elements, namely audio and video (which include attributes such as poster, src, controls, autoplay, loop, muted, preload, and, of course, video width and height) (p. 163). Additionally, he covers a range of media events (such as playing, pause, ended, volumechange, seeked, etc.) (p. 174).

Gasston also spends time on APIs, such as full screen, drag and drop (P. 119), Web storage (p. 117), battery status (p. 114) of mobile device, geolocation, and orientation (with detection of the full axis of rotation of the mobile or other device). Furthermore, Gasston talks about scalable vector graphics and the canvas (the latter of which is good for gaming and image manipulation while the former is actually part of the DOM and thereby accessible to Javascript).

Features that I'm personally most interested in include the following: media queries (p. 17, p. 40), combining multiple queries (p. 44), solution for mobile device zoom using @viewport media query (p. 50), adaptive (fixed width layouts) versus responsive (media queries plus fluid layout) (p. 53), box-sizing: border-box style (p. 54), root relative ems called REMs (set at 62.5% to equal 10px in most browsers) (p. 56), flex-box containers (using display: flex-box) for aligning items in a row (and requiring a vendor prefix for Webkit) (p. 70), modernizer for detecting and styling features such as flex-box (p. 101, p. 106), and, last-but-not-least, the new Javascript methods: "querySelector()" (which selects an element rather than an ID), "querySelectorAll() (which selects an array of elements ), and "getElementsByClassName."

Most surprising is that I have just touched the surface of what this book covers! If you want to know the future of the Web, this book will surely tune you in to the latest and best features across HTML5, CSS3, and Javascript.

All-in-all, Gasston's book is definitely more than worth the investment. He will not only entertain but also enlighten you with the very best of the future of the Web.

(A wonderful event would be for Peter Gasston to consider writing a book dedicated solely to the building and publishing of apps! Gasston's books are, frankly, unparalleled, and I'm certain his apps book would be of the same caliber!)
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