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The Media Equation: How People Treat Computers, Television, and New Media like Real People and Places (CSLI Lecture Notes) (Englisch) Gebundene Ausgabe – 13. September 1996


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Produktinformation

  • Gebundene Ausgabe: 317 Seiten
  • Verlag: Cambridge University Press (13. September 1996)
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ISBN-10: 157586052X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1575860527
  • Größe und/oder Gewicht: 15,2 x 2,3 x 22,8 cm
  • Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung: 4.1 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (8 Kundenrezensionen)
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: Nr. 651.792 in Fremdsprachige Bücher (Siehe Top 100 in Fremdsprachige Bücher)
  • Komplettes Inhaltsverzeichnis ansehen

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Produktbeschreibungen

Pressestimmen

"If [Byron and Nass'] results as reported in this startling and well-written book are confirmed by further research, the conclusions have profound implications for anyone who designs or uses computer software or communication media. At long last, social scientists are applying the methods of systematic observation and testing to some of the most troubling questions of the modern era, questions about the kind of people we've become, now that we've created machines that mimic our thoughts and behavior." Howard Rheingold, author of Virtual Community

Über das Produkt

In an extraordinary revision of received wisdom, Byron Reeves and Clifford Nass demonstrate convincingly in The Media Equation that interactions with computers, television, and new communication technologies are identical to real social relationships and to the navigation of real physical spaces.

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4.1 von 5 Sternen
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Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen

1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von "n8willis" am 7. Juli 2000
Format: Taschenbuch
This fatally-flawed book is boundless in it's overgeneralizations and poor research designs. The authors refer constantly to a "growing body of research" on the topic of social interaction with media, when in fact they are only quoting themselves in previous publications.
They have presupposed the "equation" they purport to have discovered, and designed their experiments to try and uncover it. This book chronicles the worst example I have ever seen of what happens when you set up a scientific experiment to try and show what you want to find, rather than to collect unbiased data and then scour the results and draw your conclusions after the fact.
Reeves and Nass expect to find the Media Equation beneath every stone, and consequently they do. The experiments themselves, to anyone with a background in legitimate science, are a casebook of poor design. They ignore intervening variables, intercoder reliability, and representative sampling. They lean heavily on self-selected and forced participants, subjectively worded and loaded questions, and performing statistical tests on non-numerical data (what is the mean of "rarely" and "often"...? Reeves and Nass will base their results on it).
In many cases, they contradict their own results from earlier points in the book, when it suits the experiment at hand. Other times, it seems they will ascribe every reaction to the media equation, regardless of how preposterous it seems. Case in point: People remember a face on a t.v. screen better when it is a close up than when it is a long distance shot. No kidding -- but Reeves and Nass chalk this up to a "social reaction" to the face.
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Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
Anyone working in "new media" (writers, political consultants, market research, advertising, software designers, tv and movie makers, webmasters, cinematographers, etc.), not aware of how our "old," hunter-gatherer brains interpret the modern world, isn't working with a full tool box.

Authors Reeves and Nass show, through their experiments, that people (including programmers and many others intimately familiar with how media works) cannot disengage hard-wired caveman brains when working with software, playing a game, watching an ad, or seeing a movie. If we could, then why did that horror movie make our hearts race? And why did it make us jumpy afterwards?

So how do we treat computers like people? Here's one example from the book. In human interaction, one is likely to politely agree (a/k/a fib a little) with an acquaintance who says, "Isn't this a great sweater?" One also tends to be more honest discussing the sweater with a third party, "That sweater isn't my favorite color."

If people do treat computers like humans, then (substituting computers for people in the example), a person would agree with Computer A (out of politeness!), but tell Computer B the truth. And that's what happened in the authors' test lab.

People were quizzed by Computer A (programmed to perform poorly), "Aren't I doing a great job?" -- and they gave Computer A high marks. Then, in another room, Computer B asked about Computer A's performance... and people rated Computer A more honestly (and consistantly lower than they rated Computer A "to its face.") The pattern of response to the computers matched the way people interact with each other.
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Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
This book presents a series of social psychology experiments which demonstrate that in almost all respects people treat media representations of people and places like the real thing. The rules and social cues which apply to interactions with other people subconsciously apply to interactions with a face on a screen, or a computer interface, or a disembodied voice. People interacting with a computer which praises them for their performance on a quiz will attribute the same characteristics to the computer as they would to a person who praises - the computer will be seen as more competent and its feedback will be more valued. Social attribution can even occur with an interface as technologically unsophisticated as text on a screen. Why we act this way can be explained by our brain's evolutionary past - during the evolution of the brain all entities which looked or behaved like people were exactly that, there were no artificial representations. Representations in media are therefore interpreted naturally, that is, as they would appear in the world. So while our conscious minds are sophisticated enough to tell the difference and may deny interacting in a social manner with media, our old subconscious does not make the distinction.
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Von Ein Kunde am 16. November 1999
Format: Taschenbuch
Reeves and Nass worked out well a previously less studied connection btw. pc's and other audio-visual media vs. humans. Equating the term "social" to computers paves the way to further understanding of ever graphically evolving interfaces.
In my opinion, one of their most unexpected investigation was that a perfect audio overrided the effect of an ordinary or even low-quality video...
Also the "self/other praising" stuff was intriguing. The unconscious perception of male vs. female voice deserves more worked examples as well as for "source orientation" ,"motion" and "subliminal images".
Everything is pretty well organized but through reading, I have been a little disappointed of early short-cutting of almost every chapter and controlled experiments are told with minimal technical detail. Also synthesis based on investigations would have required more insight. I appreciate that this volume aims a broad range of readers with little special background but the text "as is", seems a little way "dryed-out" of taste. Its readers deserve more, I think.
Anyway.... great work !
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