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The Man Without a Face: The Unlikely Rise of Vladimir Putin (Englisch) Gebundene Ausgabe – 1. März 2012

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Produktinformation

  • Gebundene Ausgabe: 304 Seiten
  • Verlag: Riverhead Hardcover (1. März 2012)
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ISBN-10: 9781594488429
  • ISBN-13: 978-1594488429
  • ASIN: 1594488428
  • Vom Hersteller empfohlenes Alter: Ab 18 Jahren
  • Größe und/oder Gewicht: 16,1 x 3 x 23,5 cm
  • Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung: 4.0 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (3 Kundenrezensionen)
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: Nr. 168.537 in Fremdsprachige Bücher (Siehe Top 100 in Fremdsprachige Bücher)

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Produktbeschreibungen

Pressestimmen

A Slate and San Francisco Chronicle Best Book of 2012

"[An] absorbing portrait… Gessen is most illuminating when she details the historical accidents that allowed an unexceptional bureaucrat to rule Russia." –The New Yorker  

“Part psychological profile, part conspiracy study… As a Moscow native who has written perceptively for both Russian and Western publications, Gessen knows the cultures and pathologies of Russia… [and has] a delicious command of the English language… A fiercely independent journalist… Gessen’s armchair psychoanalysis of Putin is speculative. But it is a clever and sometimes convincing speculation, based on a close reading of Putin’s own inadvertently revealing accounts of his life, and on interviews with people who knew Putin before he mattered.” –The New York Times Book Review  

“In a country where journalists critical of the government have a way of meeting untimely deaths, Ms. Gessen has shown remarkable courage in researching and writing this unflinching indictment of the most powerful man in Russia… Although written before the recent protests erupted, the book helps to explain the anger and outrage driving that movement.” –The Wall Street Journal

“Thanks to her fearless reporting and acute psychological insights, Masha Gessen has done the impossible in writing a highly readable, compelling life of Russia's mysterious president-for-life.” –Tina Brown, The Daily Beast 

"Powerful and gracefully written… Gessen's book flows on multiple tracks, tracing Putin's life back to boyhood, the story of his hometown of St. Petersburg, and finally the last quarter-century of Russian history… For all of the ghoulish detail, Gessen's account of Russia is not overwrought… [she] displays impressive control of her prose and her story, painting a portrait of a vile Putin without sounding polemical." –San Francisco Chronicle

“Engrossing and insightful.” –Bloomberg

"Gessen shines a piercing light into every dark corner of Putin's story… Fascinating, hard-hitting reading." –Foreign Affairs

“[An] incisive bildingsroman of Putin and his regime… Alongside an acute apprehension of the post-Soviet dynamics that facilitated Putin’s rise, Gessen balances narratives of Putin-as-bureaucrat and Putin-as-kleptocrat with a wider indictment of the “Mafia clan” that retains him solely as its Godfather.” –The Daily

“Illuminating… Gessen sprinkles telltale signs of the Putin who would eventually emerge and rule Russia with an iron fist…It is with these explosive revelations that Gessen truly excels… [She] presents her case calmly, picking holes in Putin’s character, his policies, and his rule without stooping to hysterical condemnation… an electrifying read from what can only be described as an incredibly brave writer.” –Columbia Journalism Review

“A chilling and brave work of nonfiction… Gessen has succeeded in convincingly portraying the forces that made Putin who he is today.” –Bookpage

"Although Gessen is enough of an outsider to write beautifully clear and eloquent English, she is enough of an insider to convey, accurately, the wild swings of emotions, the atmosphere of mad speculation, the paranoia, and, yes, the hysteria that pervade all political discussion and debate in Moscow today." –The New York Review of Books

“What Gessen sees in Putin is a troubled childhood brawler who became a paper-pushing KGB man and, by improbable twists and turns, rose to the top in Russia… [She] does not attempt to weigh up Putin’s record but rather examines his biography, mind-set and methods… as a thug loyal to the KGB and the empire it served who never had a clue about the Earth-shattering events that blew the Soviet Union apart.” –The Washington Post

“An eye opening story with all the drama and intrigue of a novel.” –Popmatters

“Written in English but with Russian heart, Gessen focuses on the places and institutions that bred the nation's most resolute leader since Stalin… Some might say that Gessen's interpretation is political. Of course it is… but more importantly, it is thorough. She has seen fellow journalists killed, has been harassed herself, and yet continues to write from Russia… Her urgency is felt on nearly every page.” –Bookforum

Über den Autor und weitere Mitwirkende

 Masha Gessen is a journalist and the author of several previous books, most recently Perfect Rigor. Editor of the Russian-language Snob magazine, she has contributed to Vanity Fair, The New Republic, Granta, and Slate, among other publications. 

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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von Bernhard Schmidt am 29. Mai 2013
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe Verifizierter Kauf
If you have followed Russia in the press in more detail in the last years, this book reveals nothing new and exiting. Nice read, but for people with Russia experience no profound new information.
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Wir konnten Ihre Stimmabgabe leider nicht speichern. Bitte erneut versuchen
Format: Kindle Edition Verifizierter Kauf
Dieses Buch hat es mir in verständlicher Weise erklärt wie der Putin tickt. Meiner Meinung nach wäre das Buch sogar für internationale Politiker eine informative Nachtlektüre, die ihnen helfen könnte sich auf Verhandlungen mit diesem ominösen Strongman der russischen Führung vorzubereiten.
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Wir konnten Ihre Stimmabgabe leider nicht speichern. Bitte erneut versuchen
Von Bobtheknob am 22. April 2015
Format: Taschenbuch Verifizierter Kauf
Definitely worth reading. The provided insights are real gems and help to understand Russia's and Putin's current situation and attitude.
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Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen auf Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 219 Rezensionen
86 von 107 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Great Subject Matter Doesn't Match Expectations 23. Juni 2012
Von William Capodanno - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe Verifizierter Kauf
Following the collapse and dissolution of the Soviet Union, political, economic and social chaos ensued across Russia as reactionary and progressive democratic factions attempted to shape the future of Russia. As the economy collapsed and the initial optimism and hope of post-totalitarianism began to fade, a power vacuum existed and the question was who would fill it. The who became Vladmidir Putin and the hope of many around the world for a more democratic, economically and politically open country aligned to the West became dashed.

After hearing an interview of Masha Gessen when this book was published, I immediately downloaded it to my Kindle although never got around to reading until a few weeks ago. Based on the interview with Gessen, I was quite optimistic to read "The Unlikely Rise of Vladimir Putin", but was disappointed with the fruits of Gessen's labor. I recognize some of the fiercest critiques of this book come from Russian individuals who consider this a hack job on Putin. I think much of their criticism is unwarranted as the reality of Putin's methodical and systemic crushing of political opposition, the free press and a growing capitalistic economic infrastructure is without question. To dismiss legitimate and real concerns about the brutal crackdown of Putin and his cronies is to ignore reality and impugn ones own credibility. Gessen is an ardent critic of Putin's and while I expected a book that covered the reality of his impact on Russia, I wasn't expecting the overt polemic that this book really is. Gessen's language is so ruthless and loaded about Putin that the book reads more like a couple hundred page op-ed than an investigative and highly researched biography. I'm not suggesting that a highly critical op-ed length book is not fair territory, it is just not why I read this book. There was subject matter like the tragic hostage situations in Beslan and the Moscow movie theater that both ended in tragedy where Gessen implicates parts of Putin's regime with fostering these situations and recklessly bringing them to tragic finalities. Sure there was some circumstantial evidence to her assertions, but I've read better investigative pieces in the New York Times than what is covered in the book.

Do I share many of the sentiments of Gessen? I sure do and believe that Putin has set Russia back with his jailing of politcal threats and opponents, consolidation of power with his political party, United Russia, through sham elections and fear, as well as the evisceration of freedom of press, all resulting in the return of totalitarianism where so much promise existed. However, I was expecting a better piece of journalism and writing, one with less bias, more objectivity and far greater dimension than I found in "The Man Without a Face".
111 von 146 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
The Man Without a face: The Unlikely Rise of Vladimir Putin 5. März 2012
Von Rob Nelson - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe Verifizierter Kauf
Masha Gessen deserves a standing ovation for this brave work. In a society where the press has been routinely crushed, terrorized and indeed killed for their writings, she has created a deep look into the past of this very powerful man. I am thoroughly enjoying her writing style and the depth of her research into Putin's past. Putin just this week in his latest address post election characterized the USA as adversarial. I recommend this book for anyone who seeks peace and freedom. I am reading this book on my Samsung Galaxy Tablet.

I have now finished the book. Highly recommend. The number of people Putin hurt, killed, destroyed is amazing. Sad that he is still skimming BILLIONS from the society for his own estate and "CASTLE."

I got a giggle from the "comment." They must have a track on the book and dis it whenever they can to try to convince people to NOT read it. Power does corrupt in so many cases.
31 von 42 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Vladimir Putin, the KGB, and the restoration of Soviet Russia 10. Januar 2013
Von Mal Warwick - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verifizierter Kauf
Every once in a while I'm shocked to learn anew that the American news media has missed the mark in its reporting of events around the world. Masha Gessen's recent portrait of third-term Russian President Vladimir Putin, The Man Without a Face, is an excellent case in point.

For example, one year ago, in December 2011, we learned about large demonstrations in Moscow protesting the obviously rigged outcome of the latest Russian elections, which had awarded nearly 50 percent of the vote to the President's party, United Russia. What I didn't learn from the reports I read here in America was that estimates of the crowd in Moscow ran as high as 150,000 and that "[p]rotests were held [the same day] in ninety-nine cities in Russia and in front of Russian consulates and embassies in more than forty cities around the world." Reports in The New York Times and other U.S. news sources gave the impression that the events were the work of Russia's tiny, long-beleaguered liberal minority and meant little. In fact, the demonstrations and marches were far more broad-based than the liberals had ever shown themselves to be capable of organizing. Masha Gessen tells the whole story in The Man Without a Face.

Or consider the experience of the brave souls who put themselves forward as candidates for President to replace Putin. It's possible but unlikely that you came across something awhile back about Garry Kasparov, the world's most famous Russian and the most celebrated chess player of all time, when he announced he was running for President. Kasparov could easily have attracted crowds of thousands anywhere in the vast expanses of Russia, but everywhere he went he found the doors locked at the venues he'd arranged and often found himself speaking to 50 or 100 people out-of-doors. He persisted for months nonetheless. until it was made clear to him that he was risking his life by doing so. Masha Gessen tells the whole story in The Man Without a Face.

Roughly the same thing happened to Mikhail Prokhorov, the 6'8″ Russian billionaire who bought the New Jersey Nets (now the Brooklyn Nets) professional basketball team. When the regime asked him to be the front man for a moribund political party to give the appearance of democratic choice in the 2012 Presidential elections, Prokhorov took the assignment seriously. He mounted a vigorous campaign, fashioning an agenda for reform, traveling throughout the country, and speaking out boldly -- until he was informed that if he continued to pursue the Presidency he would lose all his businesses, his freedom, and possibly his life. I'd been aware of Prokhorov's abortive campaign, but I learned none of the rest of this from news reports in the United States. Masha Gessen tells the whole story in The Man Without a Face.

You might wonder, as I had, how the democratic path that Russia was on through most of the 1990s had veered so sharply, and so suddenly, rightward toward a brand of authoritarianism reminiscent of the tsars and the commissars. Gessen's answer lies in the circumstances surrounding the selection of Vladimir Putin as Boris Yeltsin's successor in 2000 by the circle of intimates known as "The Family" who surrounded the ailing Russian President.

After a decade in office, Yeltsin was gravely ill and acting erratically as a result (not because of heavy drinking, Gessen asserts). His popularity had plunged into the low single digits, and the Russian people were seeking "solace in nostalgia -- not so much in Communist ideology . . . but in a longing to regain Russia's superpower status. By 1999, there was palpable aggression in the air, and this was a large part of the reason Yeltsin and the Family were rightly terrified." They feared the rise of an ultra-right-wing nationalist who might destroy all that they had achieved in a decade and cast about for a like-minded standard-bearer as Yeltsin's successor who marshal popular support.

"Imagine you have a country and no one to run it," Gessen writes. "This was the predicament that Boris Yeltsin and his inner circle thought they faced in 1999." In desperation, knowing virtually nothing of the man's character, his work habits, or his political beliefs, they turned to a low-level former KGB operative who had recently been elevated to head the KGB's successor, the FSB -- Vladimir Putin. They named him Premier, then Acting President when Yeltsin resigned, brought in a team of image-makers and campaign specialists, mobilized the pro-democratic community, pulled together a sanitized biography in three weeks, and ran him for President. As The Guardian wrote in its review of this book, "[g]rey, ordinary and seemingly incorruptible, Putin is the man without a face, on to whom others can project whatever they want."

Tragically, Putin's true nature only became apparent in the months following his election in 2000. Somehow, his self-description as a "thug" -- a claim he made on many occasions -- had been overlooked, and the thugocracy he built during his first two terms as Russia's President came as a total surprise to nearly everyone except the very few who knew him well. Investigative journalists who turned up evidence of corruption or worse were simply murdered one after another, their killers never arrested. While the senseless war in Chechnya went on year after year after year, attacks by Chechen terrorists were brutally put down by the Russian military, with hundreds of civilian hostages losing their lives -- even, in one case, while the terrorists were engaged in negotiations with the police. Business tycoons who refused to support the regime were imprisoned on trumped-up charges and ownership of their businesses transferred to Putin and his cronies. Putin himself built up a personal fortune rumored to be as high as $40 billion. That estimate might be exaggerated, but the total is certainly somewhere in the billions, as Putin built himself a palace on the Black Sea at a cost of more than $1 billion.

Masha Gessen knows whereof she writes. She lives in Moscow, where she has held a series of increasingly high-profile jobs in journalism. Her career had barely begun when the Soviet Union collapsed in 1991. The Man Without a Face is a personal book, and opinionated, but it represents a lifetime of work side-by-side with many of the individuals whose actions are described.
40 von 55 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Interesting but very biased with own agenda 1. Mai 2012
Von Byron - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verifizierter Kauf
I read the whole book and it was fascinating. The author really did a disservice though which left me questioning the validity of all of their assertions. By the end it was clear the author supported the big oligarchs who had obviously made their money from unregulated practices. There was no attempt to be critical of them, and even sought to be apologetic and supportive of their plight. This I found to ruin the credibility of the whole book. It is really wrong to be critical of one lot of people for doing 'not good things' then apologise for others when they're doing the same 'not good things' but that's ok, cause they seemingly didn't win.. If its not ok, then you can't apologise for any one of them..

One lot gained political success through a period of turmoil and unregulated structures, the other lot made billions of $$. I can't feel sorry for either, and I'm not sure if I believe the author after reading they want us to feel sorry for the ones who made billions..

Otherwise it was interesting, a good insight into how someone inside Russia views their own country. How true what they say is, is now not so certain. But still interesting.
4 von 4 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Failure 17. April 2014
Von JOHN Gorski - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verifizierter Kauf
A story with mostly hearsay and disjointed evidence. I am not a lover of Mr Putin but a biography should consist of a solid story of the person.
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