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The Invisible Computer: Why Good Products Can Fail, the Personal Computer Is So Complex, and Information Appliances Are the Solution (Englisch) Taschenbuch – 20. August 1999

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Produktinformation

  • Taschenbuch: 320 Seiten
  • Verlag: Mit Press; Auflage: Revised. (20. August 1999)
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ISBN-10: 0262640414
  • ISBN-13: 978-0262640411
  • Vom Hersteller empfohlenes Alter: Ab 22 Jahren
  • Größe und/oder Gewicht: 15,2 x 1,5 x 22,9 cm
  • Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung: 3.2 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (16 Kundenrezensionen)
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: Nr. 194.399 in Fremdsprachige Bücher (Siehe Top 100 in Fremdsprachige Bücher)
  • Komplettes Inhaltsverzeichnis ansehen

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Produktbeschreibungen

Amazon.de

While Donald Norman acknowledges in The Invisible Computer that the personal computer allows for "flexibility and power," he also makes its limitations perfectly clear. Currently, computer users must navigate a sea of guidebooks, frequently asked questions (FAQs), and wizards to perform a task such as searching the Web or creating a spreadsheet. "The personal computer is perhaps the most frustrating technology ever," he writes. "It should be quiet, invisible, unobtrusive." His vision is that of the "information appliance", digital tools created to answer our specific needs, yet interconnected to allow communication between devices.

His solution? "Design the tool to fit so well that the tool becomes a part of the task." He proposes using the PC as the infrastructure for devices hidden in walls, in car dashboards, and held in the palm of the hand. A word of caution: some of Norman's zealotry leads to a certain creepiness (global positioning body implants) and goofiness (electric-power-generating plants in shoes). His message, though, is reasonably situated in the concept that the tools should bend to fit us and our goals: we sit down to write, not to word process; to balance bank accounts, not to fill in cells on a spreadsheet. In evenly measuring out the future of humanity's technological needs--and the limitations of the PC's current incarnation--Norman presents a formidable argument for a renaissance of the information appliance. --Jennifer Buckendorff

Pressestimmen

Don Norman has established himself as high technology's leading thinker on user interfaces and on why PCs are too complex. Wall Street Journal ...the bible of 'post-PC' thinking. Business Week

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Kundenrezensionen

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4 von 4 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von David P. Bishop am 12. April 2000
Format: Taschenbuch
The book is absolutely not as provocative as the title. There is some solid information in it about:
* user-centered design,
* the technology life cycle,
* product design processes, and
* why it is so hard to design easy to use products which are successful in the marketplace
By way of example: If you are unfamiliar with Moore's book "Crossing the Chasm," there is a decent summary in Chapter 2 of Norman's book, and he covers issues like this reasonably well throughout the book, and ties them in to product design issues. None of this is new, though, and it might have little to do with information appliances.
I was hoping for a bit of a harder sell from Norman, to see him stick his neck out and make a stronger call for an information-appliance-rich future, but he spent too much time on supporting information to ever cover his vision well.
If you have read Moore's book, have read Mirrorworlds, and do human-centered design on a daily basis, then read:
Chapter 3 ("The Move to Information Appliances"), Chapter 11 ("Disruptive Technologies"), and Chapter 12 ("A World of Information Appliances") ...and skip the rest of the book.
If you who would like a broad brush overview of some of the bullet points listed earlier, consider this book. In fact, skip chapters 3,11, and 12. Just don't be confused about the originality of Norman's work, here: he may be an evangelist, but the gospel did not originate with him.
If you want to read Don Norman, consider "Turn Signals are the Facial Expressions of Automobiles" and "The Design of Everyday Things" before you read "The Invisible Computer.
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2 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von David Lenef am 22. Januar 2000
Format: Taschenbuch
The book is a rallying cry for the technology industry, a call to arms for the geek troops. Sure, the writing is like a beta version that the publisher decided to go live with, but the essential concepts and emotion come through loud and clear.
Norman builds a solid foundation for his arguments, citing historical cases and several written works. The book was a fun, easy read. When I finished Invisible Computer, I felt the same sort of illumination and clarity that came after reading Alan Cooper's About Face.
His vision of ubiquitous information appliances and devices will undoubtedly come true in ways none of us can imagine. But what will become of the PC? Will I have 100 individual devices replacing the 100 software programs I have installed? Hardly. But the book doesn't really address the ongoing need for a general purpose computer.
In the end, I would recommend this book to anyone involved in technology. It definitely altered my personal perception of where tech products have come from and where they are headed. Time will tell if his ideas are strong enough to truly help shape the future of software and product development.
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Von Ein Kunde am 17. Februar 1999
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
Yeah, right. Edison didn't know what he was doing because he wasn't "customer centered" enough to make flat records. All he ever did in his life was invent sound recording, plus four or five other basic technologies and major pieces of several more. And he died a rich man. What a slacker. If he'd been really smart, and emulated Gould, Fisk, and Morgan, he might have been a real *success.*
If you're fascinated by suitspeak and willing to embrace mediocrity and corporate B.S., then you'll get a lot out of this book. But if you've been working in the business for ten or twenty years, then Norman's blatherings are going to look like just more pin-stripe, synergy-leveraging suitfeed.
And, BTW, the set-top box he touts as a good idea was a failure. Edison failed the same way with his first invention (the vote recorder), but was honest enough with himself to call a failure a failure. Norman fails to.
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While I fully agree with the thrust of Don Norman's book and find it entertaining and easy to follow, I also think it is somewhat verbose - but perhaps I am already too familar with many of the usability arguments. There are many reiterations. At times you think, when the hell will he get to the point? On page 4 you read: "For my purposes, the story of Thomas Alva Edison is the most relevant; he played a major role in many of those early information industries.." (yes yes go ahead); a few paragraphs later you read "Edisons's story is a great place to start. In many ways, Edison invented the high-technology industry.." - this is what sends me into skimming and skipping mode. You are beginning to suspect the book hasn't quite received the final trim. Nevertheless, well worth reading.
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The book is persuasive in its central argument that today's PC is overgrown, difficult to use, and suffers from its fundamental architecture as a multipurpose device. The point is made adequately in the introduction and first chapter, however, and the rest of the meat of he book just belabors the point, often repeating the same points in the exact same words.
The appendix on examples of information appliances is fun, though, as he finally gets to what he thinks will be the next generation of devices to replace the PC.
Also, I sometimes found his arguments about market forces and the business model of the technology industry simplistic, even naive. I found it hard to believe at times that he worked at Apple all those years.
Still, I enjoyed skimming it.
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