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The Inmates Are Running the Asylum: Why High Tech Products Drive Us Crazy and How to Restore the Sanity (2nd Edition) [Kindle Edition]

Alan Cooper
4.1 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (77 Kundenrezensionen)

Kindle-Preis: EUR 11,99 Inkl. MwSt. und kostenloser drahtloser Lieferung über Amazon Whispernet

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The recurring metaphor in The Inmates are Running the Asylum is that of the dancing bear--the circus bear that shuffles clumsily for the amusement of the audience. Such bears, says author Alan Cooper, don't dance well, as everyone at the circus can see. What amazes the crowd is that the bear dances at all. Cooper argues that technology (videocassette recorders, car alarms, most software applications for personal computers) consists largely of dancing bears--pieces that work, but not at all well. He goes on to say that this is more often than not the fault of poorly designed user interfaces, and he makes a good argument that way too many devices (perhaps as a result of the designers' subconscious wish to bully the people who tormented them as children) ask too much of their users. Too many systems (like the famous unprogrammable VCR) make their users feel stupid when they can't get the job done.

Cooper, who designed Visual Basic (the programming environment Microsoft promotes for the purpose of creating good user interfaces), indulges in too much name-dropping and self-congratulation (Cooper attributes the quote, "How did you do that?" to Microsoft chairman Bill Gates, upon looking at one of Cooper's creations)--but this appears to be de rigueur in books about the software industry. But those asides are minor. More valuable is the discourse about software design and implementation ("[O]bject orientation divides the 1000-brick tower into 10 100-brick towers."). Read this book for an idea of what's wrong with UI design. --David Wall

Topics covered: User interfaces--good ones and bad ones--and where they come from. Also, how to improve the ones you create.

Kurzbeschreibung

Imagine, at a terrifyingly aggressive rate, everything you regularly use is being equipped with computer technology. Think about your phone, cameras, cars-everything-being automated and programmed by people who in their rush to accept the many benefits of the silicon chip, have abdicated their responsibility to make these products easy to use. The Inmates Are Running the Asylum argues that the business executives who make the decisions to develop these products are not the ones in control of the technology used to create them. Insightful and entertaining, The Inmates Are Running the Asylum uses the author's experiences in corporate America to illustrate how talented people continuously design bad software-based products and why we need technology to work the way average people think. Somewhere out there is a happy medium that makes these types of products both user and bottom-line friendly; this book discusses why we need to quickly find that medium.


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4 von 4 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Von Ein Kunde
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe
Die meisten Revolutionen verliefen blutig. Auch heute, wo wir am Beginn einer Information Revolution, eines digitalen Zeitalters stehen scheint es Opfer zu geben. - Menschen, die mit den neuen supertollen Produkten einfach nicht zurecht kommen können. An und für sich ist es ja nicht verwunderlich, dass ein paar Softwareprodukte nicht besonders einfach bedienbar sind, seltsam ist nur, dass es heutzutage die große Masse der Programme ist, die einem das leben schwer macht.
"Bill Gates once observed, with uncharacteristic cynicism, that the way you made software user- friendly was by making a rubber stamp and stamping each box with the legend "USER FRIENDLY." Unintentionally, his method has become the computer industry's real method."
Alan Cooper hat erkannt, wie man die Situation verbessern könnte. Nicht, indem man ein weiteres Buch für die paar Interface Designer schreibt, die sich der Tragödie ohnehin bewusst sind, sondern eines, das sich an diejenigen richtet, die das Sagen haben. "The Inmates are Running the Asylum" ist das erste Buch über User Interface- Design, oder wie es Cooper nennt "Interaction Design", für alle, die noch nie damit zu tun hatten.
Die Rechnung geht auf: "The Inmates are Running the Asylum" ist ein hervorragender Einblick in die Welt des Software Designs allgemein und die des User Interface Designs im Besonderen. Es erklärt ausführlich, was an den bisher üblichen Abläufen der Softwareentwicklung falsch ist und wie einfach man diese verbessern könnte. Darüber hinaus führt es gut in die Cooper'sche Methode des "Goal Directed Designs"* ein und zeigt, wie falsch es eigentlich ist, Programme für "Den User" zu entwerfen.
Lesen Sie weiter... ›
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3 von 3 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen Where is the reality check? 24. Februar 2000
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe
Good read, just be cautious of the one sided slant to this book!
According to this book, the inmates are everywhere and as is the main premise of this book, they are in charge of not only shaping the asylum known as software design, but also our world. Cooper uses various anecdotal examples throughout the book to illustrate his ideas and views on technological design. Focusing entirely on how it has run amuck. Many of the examples are painfully obvious and basic.
While points are well made and key to adding to ones thought process about designing software and better ways to bring product to market. Cooper misses the boat with regards to some of the realities of business. I found Cooper's ideas a little too idealistic with little suggestion in terms of comprimise or strategic change.
Methodology also seems to be off as book is all general impression based on observation and personal experience.
Finally, If you are looking for a reminder about good common sense and a prompt on how to make your customer king, you'll find this a helpful read.
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?
3 von 3 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Pflichtlektüre für Software-Entwickler 9. Januar 2002
Von Ein Kunde
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe
Alan Cooper vermittelt dem Leser hier wieder den Blick für das Wesentliche. Obwohl der "Vater von Visual Basic" eigentlich die Engstirnigkeit heutiger Software-Entwickler und Produktmanager ankreidet, gelingt es ihm an vielen Beispielen aus dem täglichen Umfeld (Radiowecker, Videorekorder etc.) zu zeigen, was mit heutigen High-Tech Produkten nicht stimmt. Er zeigt einen praktikablen Weg, Software bedienbar zu machen.
Dieses Buch ist ein Muß für alle, die mit der Software-Entwicklung zu tun haben.
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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
1.0 von 5 Sternen Misguided 1. Mai 1999
Von Ein Kunde
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe
Although the goal, usable software applications, is noble, Alan Cooper is misguided in placing the blame on the engineers.
Feature creep is often caused by business and marketing professionals, as they think piling on more features will make it the product more desirable.
Project plans and specifications are usually poorly planned, which leads directly to engineering problems. Perhaps the business/product management side of the story needs the work.
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?
3.0 von 5 Sternen Useful ideas but infuriatingly arrogant 15. Juli 2000
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe
The Inmates are Running the Asylum makes the business case for interaction designers playing a central role in the development of technology products. It starts by providing examples of technology that is difficult, frustrating, humiliating, and even dangerous to use. Cooper argues that, although people have gotten used to being humiliated by technology, it doesn't have to be this way. His claim is that most technology, especially software, is designed by engineers who think differently than non-technical people: they enjoy being challenged by difficult problems and they are trained to think in terms of "edge cases" rather than on the common case. Thus when engineers design software, they tend to create products with far too many neat features that clutter the interface and make it difficult to do the simpler tasks. In the second part of the book, Cooper describes an approach that he and his design firm uses to simplify products and keep them focused on the users' needs, eliminating or hiding more complex features that few people use. He gives some specific and compelling examples of how they took a different approach to an interesting design problem and keep the product simple while still being powerful. He makes the case that you can grab a market with powerful, feature-rich, complex software that is frustrating to use, but you don't build customer loyalty that way; as soon as a well-designed version of that product comes along, your customers will defect. If you delight the user with your products, on the other hand, you will engender deep loyalty that will help see you through some poor business decisions. His primary example of this is the fanatical loyalty that Apple garners from its users, compared with the rage that Windows users feel toward Microsoft. Lesen Sie weiter... ›
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Die neuesten Kundenrezensionen
5.0 von 5 Sternen Just true.
Alan Cooper wonderfully describes many of the things I've been trying to articulate for years, now I have a written gospel I can pray to my executives. Lesen Sie weiter...
Veröffentlicht am 17. Mai 2010 von S. Herrlinger
3.0 von 5 Sternen verständlich & gut geschrieben
Das Buch ist gut verständlich und gibt einen sehr guten Einblick in die Abgründer der Technik, bzw. die Schwierigkeiten der Interaktion mit dieser. Lesen Sie weiter...
Veröffentlicht am 13. Oktober 2009 von Parker
4.0 von 5 Sternen This review is Short and Sweet . . .
In my company, we treat the users of our software as Customers. I see this book as a technical warning, but also as a warning about the level of service we provide. Lesen Sie weiter...
Veröffentlicht am 26. Juli 2000 von R. Rousseau
4.0 von 5 Sternen Great Ideas, Not Always Well Presented
The culture of software development is changing, but grudgingly. The short-sighted notion "It's better to be first with something bad than second with something perfect"... Lesen Sie weiter...
Veröffentlicht am 3. Juli 2000 von Brian Curtis
4.0 von 5 Sternen Can interaction design really save the software industry?
Alan Cooper wants nothing short of cultural change in the software industry. He wants to get programmers out of the business of deciding how humans will interact with computers. Lesen Sie weiter...
Veröffentlicht am 30. Juni 2000 von Jim Grey
5.0 von 5 Sternen Great Knowledge - Brilliant Presentation
Being fairly new to the usability business, this book has provided me with some very very powerful methods and ideas for interaction design. Lesen Sie weiter...
Veröffentlicht am 27. Juni 2000 von Thomas Schultz
5.0 von 5 Sternen Important Lessons Still To Be Learned by Developers
The culture of software development is changing, but grudgingly. The insane notion "It's better to be first with something bad than second with something perfect" has... Lesen Sie weiter...
Veröffentlicht am 26. Juni 2000 von Brian Curtis
2.0 von 5 Sternen Interesting Concept But...
Poorly written...redundant...not fully developed. I'm always wary of "experts" that utilize dumbing-down as a means for enlightenment. Lesen Sie weiter...
Veröffentlicht am 13. Juni 2000 von Jerry Channell
2.0 von 5 Sternen Interesting Concept But...
Poorly written...redundant...not fully developed. I'm always wary of "experts" that utilize dumbing-down as a means for enlightenment. Lesen Sie weiter...
Veröffentlicht am 13. Juni 2000 von Jerry Channell
5.0 von 5 Sternen Enlightening Approach to UI Design
This book is such an enjoyable, enlightening read, and prompts you to think about how you use (software) products and how to design them so that they are usable. Lesen Sie weiter...
Veröffentlicht am 2. Mai 2000 von "brettsea"
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