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The Honor Code: How Moral Revolutions Happen [Englisch] [Taschenbuch]

Kwame Anthony Appiah

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Kurzbeschreibung

18. Oktober 2011
Honour emerges at the centre of our modern world in Kwame Anthony Appiah's The Honor Code. Over the last few centuries, new democratic movements have led to the emancipation of women, slaves and the oppressed. What drove these modern changes, Appiah argues, was not imposing legislation from above but harnessing the ancient power of honour from within. He explores the end of the duel in England, the tumultuous struggles over footbinding in nineteenth-century China and the uprising of ordinary people against Atlantic slavery. Finally, he confronts the horrors of "honour killing" in contemporary Pakistan, where rape victims are murdered by their relatives. He argues that honour, used to justify the practice, can also be the most effective weapon against it. Intertwining philosophy and historical narrative, Appiah has created a dramatic work, which demonstrates that honour is the driving force in the struggle against man's inhumanity to man.

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The Honor Code: How Moral Revolutions Happen + Experiments in Ethics (Mary Flexner Lecture Series of Bryn Mawr College)
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Produktbeschreibungen

Pressestimmen

"He [Appiah] sounds an urbane and civilised note when discussing what are often raucous and rancorous issues. But the civilised note is quietly compelling, and never more so than in this latest book." The Guardian "...it's good to be able to salute writing whose message is of hope, progress and moral courage...The Honor Code is not, strictly speaking, a history book, but rather a work of social and moral philosophy which draws on historical evidence...The message is that morality matters, and social action can change things for the better." Stephen Howe, The Independent Christmas Books 2010 "Among the books which have found a particular place in my mind, and heart, this year are several by dear colleagues at Princeton. These include The Honor Code...Appiah is a beautiful stylist, who ranges over an extraordinary array of topics in which the notion of "honour" may be relevant either to an individual or a society." Paul Muldoon, Books of the Year 2010, The Times Literary Supplement "This [The Honor Code] is in so many ways a brilliant book." New Humanist

Über den Autor und weitere Mitwirkende

Kwame Anthony Appiah is the president of the PEN American Center. Born in Ghana and educated in Britain, he has taught philosophy on three continents and is currently a professor at Princeton University. He is the author of Cosmopolitanism (ISBN 978 0 393 32933 9). Author website: www.appiah.net

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Amazon.com: 3.8 von 5 Sternen  19 Rezensionen
27 von 27 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen How do moral revolutions happen? 19. Dezember 2010
Von Jaylia3 - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe|Verifizierter Kauf
Dueling, foot-binding, slavery and "honor" killings were once considered honorable practices but today most people find them repellent. In THE HONOR CODE Appiah analyzes these four examples to illustrate how traditional beliefs about honor came to be in sharp contrast with evolving views of morality. In each case, arguments against the practices were well known long before they were given up, but knowledge alone wasn't enough. "Honor" killing has not been completely eliminated, but for each of the other practices Appiah details how the development of an expanded, less insular world view or "honor world" changed cultural beliefs and overthrew these long held customs. With this book Appiah is hoping to help spark modern moral revolutions.

Appiah talks about what these modern revolutions might be in an excellent September 2010 article in the Washington Post. Just as we look back with horror at slavery and foot binding, people in the future may condemn one or more of our current practices. To determine what might cause our descendants to wonder "What were they thinking?!" Appiah provides three guidelines: first, arguments against the practice have long been in place, second, defenders of the practice cite tradition, human nature or necessity as reasons to continue (How could we grow cotton without slaves?), and third, supporters of the practice engage in strategic ignorance, for instance wearing slave-grown cotton without considering where it comes from. Appiah's contemporary candidates for moral revolutions include industrial meat production, the current prison system, the institutionalization and isolation of the elderly, and the devastation of the environment.

Appiah is a philosophy professor at Princeton and his writing is sometimes a little choppy in a logician's proof solving style, but the material is well thought out, timely and fascinating.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen The Overlooked Path to Dousing the Flames of Hatred and Intolerance 7. Oktober 2010
Von Brian Forst - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe|Verifizierter Kauf
For all the handwringing over how to defend ourselves against violent Islamic extremists, the central point raised by Professor Appiah in "The Honor Code" has been widely overlooked: We can do better than accept codes of honor that harm us all. Mainstream Muslims can be supported to rein in and pacify their extreme factions by changing the codes of honor that drive young men to commit acts of violence in the name of a holy cause in the first place. It took some 200 years for Christians to change the codes of honor that gave rise to toxic notions of martyrdom, holy war and infidels during the Crusades, and in today's world of instant communication technology, Muslims who operate under the very same notions should be convertible in much less time -- perhaps in a few short years, and certainly in our lifetimes. As Appiah writes, honor killings in Pakistan have already been reduced by a decline in the acceptability of that practice, and the emergence of such websites as Arabs and Muslims Against Honor Killing (whose slogan is "No honor in honor killing") should give us all reason to be more positive about the future.

This book may also encourage us to shift our own codes of honor from ones that encourage our lunatic fringes to produce international frenzy in threatening to burn Korans in public to alternatives that recognize that we pray to the same God as Muslims and share interests of living good lives, experiencing the warmth of family and friends, and raising our children in a healthier, more peaceful world.

Appiah exposes the problem of harm done in the name of honor to a bright light. He may have earned himself a major peace prize in so doing. He may have earned for us all genuinely enhanced prospects for peace.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen In A World Where Everything Has Become "Dollarized", It's Time To Talk About Honor 15. September 2010
Von Benjamin Reid Lodmell - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe
I follow the rule that it is not my place to judge others, yet it is hard to keep a distance from the great and eternal questions about human ethics and morality. I find this discussion especially true now because the "dollarization" of just about everything feels ubiquitous. That's why I love this book. Honor, like freedom, is a butchered word and Mr. Appiah is fighting back. It reminds me of Zakaria Fareed's effort to restore the words liberty and freedom in the "Future of Freedom." Appiah also calls the consequences of moral decline for the USA and I think it's economy. Dueling, foot binding and the slave trade are still around, just in different contextes, and honor killings are alive and kicking. These are just the starting points for asking the question, "What are we thinking..." I really admire Mr. Appiah's efforts. They are honorable, indeed.
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3.0 von 5 Sternen Some Interesting Points, But Not Enough 27. Oktober 2013
Von Tsundoku Reviews - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition
Brief Summary: Throughout history honor has remained a strong incentive for human action, yet it is rarely ever researched how this honor has affected change in history. Exploring honor through moral revolutions, Appiah defines what honor really means to us as members of the human world.

The Tsundoku Scale: Middle of the Pile, 5 out of 10.

The Good: The philosophy was a strong, clear, and welcome segment in this book. It's not on par with `if a tree falls and no one is around, does it make a sound?' kind of thinking but it is still quite thought provoking. Appiah makes some truly interesting points about honor and esteem, individual and group honor, and dignity and morality, that stand out as both significant and relevant. He forces the reader to contemplate honor as an ever changing value that could at one moment in history be an advocate for something as abhorrent as slavery and then in the next moment become one of its strongest dissenters. Further, he successfully manages to separate honor from morality while still keeping honor as something personal and approachable. All the examples in the book, from dueling to slavery and from foot-binding to honor killing, are engaging and full of Appiah's wry humor and serious declarations.

The Bad: Appiah's problem is that his book tries to make history a part of honor, rather than honor a part of history. The book constantly loses its focus, perhaps most notably when Appiah describes the satirical honor killing in a movie about Sicily and then proceeds to jump to real life by talking about current honor killing in Pakistan. Both the movie and Pakistan were great examples of honor, but their relevancy to each other was forced and awkward. In much the same way, Appiah's book often feels a disjointed group of examples spanning history in "moral revolutions" that are in no way connected to one another, and seem more a history of convenience than a history of fact.
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5.0 von 5 Sternen An Important Book 31. Dezember 2010
Von Joseph C. Kusnan - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition|Verifizierter Kauf
This is an important book and I really loved read Professor Appiah's case studies of dueling, foot binding, slavery, and finally honor killing. He has a simple but brilliant insight-- that social codes and norms often restrict our ability to act and conflict with reason, morality, and humanity. Prestige, respect, and honor are major motivations. Unfortunately, Professor Appiah does not have any terrific answers for a quandry such as honor killing in many Muslim or Middle Eastern/South Asian societies. In the end, his message is hopeful; mankind can move ahead in some quantum leaps such as when it abandoned foot binding and dueling. It is fascinating to consider what outdated mores we hold now that future generations will scratch their heads at.
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