In weniger als einer Minute können Sie mit dem Lesen von The Heat of the Sun (English Edition) auf Ihrem Kindle beginnen. Sie haben noch keinen Kindle? Hier kaufen oder mit einer unserer kostenlosen Kindle Lese-Apps sofort zu lesen anfangen.

An Ihren Kindle oder ein anderes Gerät senden

 
 
 

Kostenlos testen

Jetzt kostenlos reinlesen

An Ihren Kindle oder ein anderes Gerät senden

Der Artikel ist in folgender Variante leider nicht verfügbar
Keine Abbildung vorhanden für
Farbe:
Keine Abbildung vorhanden

 

The Heat of the Sun (English Edition) [Kindle Edition]

David Rain
5.0 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (1 Kundenrezension)

Kindle-Preis: EUR 3,90 Inkl. MwSt. und kostenloser drahtloser Lieferung über Amazon Whispernet

Kostenlose Kindle-Leseanwendung Jeder kann Kindle Bücher lesen  selbst ohne ein Kindle-Gerät  mit der KOSTENFREIEN Kindle App für Smartphones, Tablets und Computer.

Geben Sie Ihre E-Mail-Adresse oder Mobiltelefonnummer ein, um die kostenfreie App zu beziehen.

Weitere Ausgaben

Amazon-Preis Neu ab Gebraucht ab
Kindle Edition EUR 3,90  
Gebundene Ausgabe EUR 16,00  
Taschenbuch EUR 10,92  
Geschenk in letzter Sekunde?
Amazon.de Geschenkgutscheine zu Weihnachten: Zum Ausdrucken | Per E-Mail


Produktbeschreibungen

Pressestimmen

"This book is a thing of beauty: Rain constructs the story like an opera libretto, with an overture, four acts and an intermission. Swinging through the decades, intermingling cultural and political developments, Rain is subtle and assured, a writer of unquestionable talent. Do yourself a favour and read this wonderful book now." -- The Irish Times

"A wildly audacious and compellingly written book… Reading The Heat of the Sun is like watching an author keep daring himself to take higher and higher hurdles and clearing them every time; he creates dizzying effects, both in his web of plot twists and in the prism of twentieth-century history through which he tells his story." –Opera News Magazine

"An explosive story of friendship . . . a sensitive, intelligent snapshot of a watershed moment in our country’s history. . . Rain’s worthy novel is a touching, often searing tale of friendship, betrayal and love. His flawed characters are staggering beneath the weight of the past, which they carry like burdens even beyond the book’s chilling, operatic conclusion." -- BookPage

"There are passages in the novel that have a heartbreaking beauty worthy of Puccini’s music." –The Washington Post

"What happened to the characters in Puccini’s opera Madama Butterfly after Cio-Cio-San’s suicide? Australian author Rain imagines some answers in . . . [a first novel that is] dramatic, even operatic, and an engaging read." -- Booklist

"Rain, who’s ‘far too young to be writing this exquisitely’ (Bookbag), imagines what happened to the son of Madame Butterfly, Puccini’s eponymous heroine." – Library Journal

"[The] characters and a sense of tragedy evoke American authors Fitzgerald and Styron, yet Rain’s outsider worldview enriches rather than dulls the narrative, particularly in sequences set in Pacific Rim Asia and others involving the Bomb. The author masterfully weaves Madame Butterfly through the 20th century, assuring that the connections never read as coincidences or plot devices." – Publisher’s Weekly

"A remarkable debut that reinvents, elaborates and extends into the late 20th century the story Puccini made famous in Madama Butterfly.

The book might be called postmodern, but it never makes references to create ironic distance—on the contrary, every detail is in the service of the elaborate, operatic melodrama, the story within the story. A version of the ancient story of love and honor, and honor betrayed, it culminates at the Trinity A-bomb test, the characters, each in their own way, devastated.

Rain is master of this inventive, operatic and at moments harrowing debut."

Kirkus Reviews

“This fantastic story swirls around an irresistibly charismatic ‘bad boy’ whose odyssey of self-definition pulls the whole world in its wake.  Like the historical epochs and episodes it weaves into a mesmerizing puzzle, The Heat of the Sun is by turns wildly colorful and strait-laced, witty and rueful, reserved and operatic. David Rain's clever mixture of fact and famous fiction puts a new spin on the ‘butterfly effect.’”
--Andrew Solomon, National Book Award winner and author of New York Times bestseller The Noonday Demon


"The more I read The Heat of the Sun, the more I admired it: for its imaginative reach, its emotional power, and the lit-up beauty and exactitude of its writing. I thought it breathtakingly good."--Sue Gee, author of The Mysteries of Glass
 
"David Rain's striking debut novel manages the audacious feat of burying its soul of romantic tragedy inside a story of great theatrical invention and whimsy.  The result is wholly original, and a lot of fun.  Read it and the 20th Century may never look the same to you again."--John Burnham Schwartz, author of Reservation Road and The Commoner
 
“David Rain is far too young to be writing this exquisitely. . . Pinkerton is glamour encapsulated. . . .The scope of the book is vast . . .from the early 1920s, through to the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. . . . The whole is a story about the universal search for love and for self, set at a time when there was less freedom to do either of those things. . .There isn’t so much an echo of Scott Fitzgerald in these pages as a gentle background refrain that hauntingly lingers at the edges of every page.”-- The Bookbag, UK

Pressestimmen

"The more I read The Heat of the Sun, the more I admired it: for its imaginative reach, its emotional power, and the lit-up beauty and exactitude of its writing. I thought it breathtakingly good."--Sue Gee, author of The Mysteries of Glass
 
"David Rain's striking debut novel manages the audacious feat of burying its soul of romantic tragedy inside a story of great theatrical invention and whimsy.  The result is wholly original, and a lot of fun.  Read it and the 20th Century may never look the same to you again."--John Burnham Schwartz, author of Reservation Road and The Commoner

Produktinformation

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • Dateigröße: 515 KB
  • Seitenzahl der Print-Ausgabe: 304 Seiten
  • ISBN-Quelle für Seitenzahl: 0805096701
  • Verlag: Atlantic Books (1. Juli 2012)
  • Verkauf durch: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ASIN: B0088Q9PUO
  • Text-to-Speech (Vorlesemodus): Aktiviert
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Nicht aktiviert
  • Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung: 5.0 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (1 Kundenrezension)
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: #127.316 Bezahlt in Kindle-Shop (Siehe Top 100 Bezahlt in Kindle-Shop)

  •  Ist der Verkauf dieses Produkts für Sie nicht akzeptabel?

Mehr über den Autor

Entdecken Sie Bücher, lesen Sie über Autoren und mehr

Kundenrezensionen

4 Sterne
0
3 Sterne
0
2 Sterne
0
1 Sterne
0
5.0 von 5 Sternen
5.0 von 5 Sternen
Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen
0 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Gut 8. Dezember 2012
Format:Kindle Edition|Verifizierter Kauf
Lese David Rain gerne.
Sehr gutes Buch, genau das, was ich haben wollte!
Freue mich schon auf das nächste Buch!
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?
Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen auf Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 3.5 von 5 Sternen  25 Rezensionen
3 von 3 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen Transnational Melodrama 19. Januar 2013
Von Roger Brunyate - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe|Vine Kundenrezension eines kostenfreien Produkts (Was ist das?)
It was the germ of a good idea. At the end of Puccini's opera MADAMA BUTTERFLY (or the David Belasco play on which it was based), US Naval Lieutenant Benjamin Franklin Pinkerton returns to Nagasaki with his new wife Kate to reclaim the son he had fathered there some years before in his "marriage" to a geisha known as Butterfly. She kills herself just as the cute blonde kid that his mother had named "Trouble" runs to his father's arms. What happens to the boy after that?

Australian author David Rain has the former lieutenant become a US senator, at one time an apparent shoo-in for President, and a major power behind the throne throughout his career. For Kate Pinkerton is more than the elegant lady who appears beautifully tailored at the end of the opera, but the daughter of significant political family who help her shape her husband's career thereafter. And Trouble? Small of stature but charismatically handsome, he is portrayed as the epitome of his nickname, with an unerring nose for trouble, the boldness to cause it, but also the tragic tendency to become his victim. It is a long time before BF Pinkerton II discovers his true parentage, although his dreams are haunted by distant memories of a devoted Asian face.

There is no need to know the opera to enjoy the book, and very little here that opera-lovers will enjoy that others may miss, other than a few arch references to well-known arias. Rain provides an excellent synopsis of the story halfway through as an entr'acte, before he introduces other characters from the opera into his later episodes. But one borrowing is entirely original. As a Nick Carraway to his Gatsby, Rain provides Trouble with a friend of his own age, Woodley Sharpless, the imagined son of the American Consul at Nagasaki who played a role in the opera as Pinkerton's enabler and unheeded advisor. The two sons are seen in a similar relationship in the book, with Sharpless running into Trouble at crisis moments, aiding him to a certain extent but ultimately unable to save him from the consequences of his folly. Meanwhile, Sharpless has developed his own career as a journalist and biographer; this is his book that we are reading.

There are four major time-periods in the novel, structured theatrically as four acts. Sharpless and Trouble meet at Blaze, an exclusive New England prep school. They then run into one another in bohemian Greenwich Village in the twenties, in Nagasaki again in the late thirties (the period of the Second Sino-Japanese War), and finally at Los Alamos just before the Trinity atomic test. The first two acts are largely generic; the school story could almost involve any two boys who do not merge easily with the crowd, though the writing is by no means bad. But as the novel proceeds, it begins to appear that Rain has a larger purpose, to use the theme as a critique of American imperialism and in particular the relationship between the United States and Japan, right through Hiroshima and (yes) Nagasaki. Unfortunately, as Rain's theme grows more serious, his plotting deteriorates, becoming increasingly implausible. By the time Kate Pinkerton had emerged as the Angela Lansbury character in THE MANCHURIAN CANDIDATE, I had pretty much had it. Taking an opera for inspiration does not license a descent into foolish melodrama. [2.5 stars]
2 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen Interesting premise, but worthy of only weak applause 8. Februar 2013
Von Neal Reynolds - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe|Vine Kundenrezension eines kostenfreien Produkts (Was ist das?)
The idea of extending the storyline of the opera, Madame Butterfly, is indeed interesting. But the story of two friends who are the sons of two of the opera's characters fails to kindle the interest of the tragic love story that inspires the book. The relationship between the two main characters starts out as interesting, but really isn't enough to carry one all the way through to the final curtain. The author does deserve credit for the attempt and he certainly shows promise of better writing to come.
2 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen Whatever happened to Madame Butterfly's son? 9. November 2012
Von Jill I. Shtulman - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe|Vine Kundenrezension eines kostenfreien Produkts (Was ist das?)
Anyone who has ever marveled at Puccini's Madame Butterfly - I've seen it several times and never without shedding a tear - is left with one question at the end: what happens to the love child of Madame Butterfly and Pinkerton? He exits the stage in the arms of his birth father and stepmother to a new life in America.

David Rain cleverly mines the life of Ben Pinkerton, the young boy who becomes known as Trouble. His father has gone on to become a senator and he arrives at his private school ready to live up to that name.

The scope of the book is ambitious: from the early 1920s through Los Alamos the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, told by his lifelong orphaned and bookish friend, Woodley Sharpless. The structure is equally bold; for example, Act One: A Boy Named Trouble - or what happened at school in the twenties; Act Two: Telmachus, Stay - or days and nights with Aunt Toolie in the Village, and so on. And the prose? Colorful if a bit distancing and operatically melodramatic in places.

One might call it an everyman search for evolving identity as well as an examination of solidly friends who strive but never quite understand the internal anguish inside of each other. In some ways, it calls to mind The Vices by Lawrence Douglas, another book about an intertwining but on some levels unsatisfying friendship.

This is a book I admired more than loved. It does sag at parts -- particularly in the mid-section -- but it does herald the talent of an emerging writer.
1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen A Moving Sequel to the Madame Butterfly Story 6. Dezember 2012
Von Alan L. Chase - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe|Vine Kundenrezension eines kostenfreien Produkts (Was ist das?)
Puccini's opera has solidified the Madame Butterfly story in the canon of great tragic tales. Imagine Lt. Pinkerton all grown up and a U.S. Senator and a Democratic presidential hopeful in the era of Calvin Coolidge. This is the setting of David Rain's novel. The author uses the events that transpired in Nagasaki in the 19th and 20th centuries as the launching pad for a tale that is both global and intimate in its perspective of the evils of warfare and colonialism.

The son born to Lt. Pinkerton and his Japanese geisha/wife - is named Benjamin, but known to all as "Trouble." He is raised as if he were the biological son of Senator Pinkerton and his American wife, Kate, the daughter of a powerful southern political family. This tale of political and military intrigue, including a cameo appearance by Robert Oppenheimer and the Manhattan Project, is told through the prism of the complex relationships that develop among the sons of Senator Pinkerton, American Counsel to Nagasaki Sharpless and Prince Yamadori. The sins of the fathers dramatically befall in dire consequences to their sons.

This beautifully written tragedy weaves plot and subplots together in ways that bespeak the subtlety of a traditional Japanese painting. The moral of the tale seems to be how exquisitely difficult it is to achieve peace at a global level and to find love and inner peace at a personal and inter-relational level. This novel is a very promising debut work by a writer we will hear from again.
1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Throughly Enjoyed It 23. April 2013
Von Wilhelmina Zeitgeist - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe|Vine Kundenrezension eines kostenfreien Produkts (Was ist das?)
"The Heat of the Sun: A Novel" by David Rain is written with a unique and fresh voice. To have the imagination and the talent to carry off this tale of Madame Butterfly's son is to be applauded.

As an opera lover who feels the pain of Madame Butterfly's sorrow, and often moved to tear when watching it live, in the Puccini opera has at time left me wondering what happened to everyone in the opera and to the child.

I loved this book and look forward to reading more by this brilliant writer.
Waren diese Rezensionen hilfreich?   Wir wollen von Ihnen hören.
Kundenrezensionen suchen
Nur in den Rezensionen zu diesem Produkt suchen

Kunden diskutieren

Das Forum zu diesem Produkt
Diskussion Antworten Jüngster Beitrag
Noch keine Diskussionen

Fragen stellen, Meinungen austauschen, Einblicke gewinnen
Neue Diskussion starten
Thema:
Erster Beitrag:
Eingabe des Log-ins
 

Kundendiskussionen durchsuchen
Alle Amazon-Diskussionen durchsuchen
   


Ähnliche Artikel finden