In weniger als einer Minute können Sie mit dem Lesen von The Good Soldier auf Ihrem Kindle beginnen. Sie haben noch keinen Kindle? Hier kaufen oder mit einer unserer kostenlosen Kindle Lese-Apps sofort zu lesen anfangen.

An Ihren Kindle oder ein anderes Gerät senden

 
 
 

Kostenlos testen

Jetzt kostenlos reinlesen

An Ihren Kindle oder ein anderes Gerät senden

Der Artikel ist in folgender Variante leider nicht verfügbar
Keine Abbildung vorhanden für
Farbe:
Keine Abbildung vorhanden
 

The Good Soldier [Kindle Edition]

Ford Madox Ford
4.2 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (17 Kundenrezensionen)

Kindle-Preis: EUR 1,49 Inkl. MwSt. und kostenloser drahtloser Lieferung über Amazon Whispernet
Der Verkaufspreis wurde vom Verlag festgesetzt.

Kostenlose Kindle-Leseanwendung Jeder kann Kindle Bücher lesen  selbst ohne ein Kindle-Gerät  mit der KOSTENFREIEN Kindle App für Smartphones, Tablets und Computer.

Geben Sie Ihre E-Mail-Adresse oder Mobiltelefonnummer ein, um die kostenfreie App zu beziehen.

Weitere Ausgaben

Amazon-Preis Neu ab Gebraucht ab
Kindle Edition EUR 1,02  
Kindle Edition, 28. Juni 2014 EUR 1,49  
Gebundene Ausgabe EUR 10,40  
Taschenbuch EUR 5,54  
Hörbuch-Download, Ungekürzte Ausgabe EUR 0,00 im Audible-Probeabo
MP3 CD, Audiobook, MP3 Audio, Ungekürzte Ausgabe EUR 21,60  

Kunden, die diesen Artikel gekauft haben, kauften auch

Seite von Zum Anfang
Diese Einkaufsfunktion wird weiterhin Artikel laden. Um aus diesem Karussell zu navigieren, benutzen Sie bitte Ihre Überschrift-Tastenkombination, um zur nächsten oder vorherigen Überschrift zu navigieren.

Produktbeschreibungen

Amazon.de

First published in 1915, Ford Madox Ford's The Good Soldier begins, famously and ominously, "This is the saddest story I have ever heard." The book then proceeds to confute this pronouncement at every turn, exposing a world less sad than pathetic, and more shot through with hypocrisy and deceit than its incredulous narrator, John Dowell, cares to imagine. Somewhat forgotten as a classic, The Good Soldier has been called everything from the consummate novelist's novel to one of the greatest English works of the century. And although its narrative hook--the philandering of an otherwise noble man--no longer shocks, its unerring cadences and doleful inevitabilities proclaim an enduring appeal.

Ford's novel revolves around two couples: Edward Ashburnham--the title's soldier--and his capable if off-putting wife, Leonora; and long-transplanted Americans John and Florence Dowell. The foursome's ostensible amiability, on display as they pass parts of a dozen pre-World War I summers together in Germany, conceals the fissures in each marriage. John is miserably mismatched with the garrulous, cuckolding Florence; and Edward, dashing and sentimental, can't refrain from falling in love with women whose charms exceed Leonora's. Predictably, Edward and Florence conduct their affair, an indiscretion only John seems not to notice. After the deaths of the two lovers, and after Leonora explains much of the truth to John, he recounts the events of their four lives with an extended inflection of outrage. From his retrospective perch, his recollections simmer with a bitter skepticism even as he expresses amazement at how much he overlooked.

Dowell's resigned narration is flawlessly conversational--haphazard, sprawling, lusting for sympathy. He exudes self-preservation even as he alternately condemns and lionizes Edward: "If I had had the courage and the virility and possibly also the physique of Edward Ashburnham I should, I fancy, have done much what he did." Stunningly, Edward's adultery comes to seem not merely excusable, but almost sublime. "Perhaps he could not bear to see a woman and not give her the comfort of his physical attractions," John surmises. Ford's novel deserves its reputation if for no other reason than the elegance with which it divulges hidden lives. --Ben Guterson

Amazon.com

First published in 1915, Ford Madox Ford's The Good Soldier begins, famously and ominously, "This is the saddest story I have ever heard." The book then proceeds to confute this pronouncement at every turn, exposing a world less sad than pathetic, and more shot through with hypocrisy and deceit than its incredulous narrator, John Dowell, cares to imagine. Somewhat forgotten as a classic, The Good Soldier has been called everything from the consummate novelist's novel to one of the greatest English works of the century. And although its narrative hook--the philandering of an otherwise noble man--no longer shocks, its unerring cadences and doleful inevitabilities proclaim an enduring appeal.

Ford's novel revolves around two couples: Edward Ashburnham--the title's soldier--and his capable if off-putting wife, Leonora; and long-transplanted Americans John and Florence Dowell. The foursome's ostensible amiability, on display as they pass parts of a dozen pre-World War I summers together in Germany, conceals the fissures in each marriage. John is miserably mismatched with the garrulous, cuckolding Florence; and Edward, dashing and sentimental, can't refrain from falling in love with women whose charms exceed Leonora's. Predictably, Edward and Florence conduct their affair, an indiscretion only John seems not to notice. After the deaths of the two lovers, and after Leonora explains much of the truth to John, he recounts the events of their four lives with an extended inflection of outrage. From his retrospective perch, his recollections simmer with a bitter skepticism even as he expresses amazement at how much he overlooked.

Dowell's resigned narration is flawlessly conversational--haphazard, sprawling, lusting for sympathy. He exudes self-preservation even as he alternately condemns and lionizes Edward: "If I had had the courage and the virility and possibly also the physique of Edward Ashburnham I should, I fancy, have done much what he did." Stunningly, Edward's adultery comes to seem not merely excusable, but almost sublime. "Perhaps he could not bear to see a woman and not give her the comfort of his physical attractions," John surmises. Ford's novel deserves its reputation if for no other reason than the elegance with which it divulges hidden lives. --Ben Guterson


Produktinformation


Mehr über die Autoren

Entdecken Sie Bücher, lesen Sie über Autoren und mehr

Kundenrezensionen

Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen
4 von 4 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Brilliant and complex 13. April 2000
Von Ein Kunde
Format:Taschenbuch
Don't get caught up in a reading that doesn't get beyond the most shallow interpretation of events and phrasing. This apparently casually written work is a masterpiece of finely thought out detail. While deconstruction can be pointless, taking irony at face value is just as futile.
It seems like a book about Leonora and Edward Ashburnham as told by a naive and passive friend, John Dowell. In reality, it is the transformation of John Dowell as he makes sense of his world after shattering information. His entire sense of reality has been undermined by the knowledge that the past 13 years 6 months were established in lies.
The structure of the novel is deceptively simple. His retelling of past events masks the fact that the action of telling the story occurs in the present. Dowell tells us he has been writing for 6 months, he goes away for 18 months, returns, and then finishes the last two chapters. The lack of a fixed time frame for the narrated histories of the major characters again blurs time. And then there is the fact that there are several layers of story. There is reality, which we can never know. There is what Dowell believed was reality, of which he gives some description. There are the stories from various points of view that Dowell was told and then digests and retells to us. Then there is the present action of Dowell's changing self. All of these except for the last, are filtered through Dowell's narration. The last is exposed through his narration. In this work we have one of the finest examples of the Impressionist style of writing, as well as the Modern.
Dowell is a recovering innocent.
Lesen Sie weiter... ›
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?
1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen A Little Masterpiece 5. August 1999
Von Ein Kunde
Format:Taschenbuch
One of the greatest examples of the spoken-word novel, The Good Soldier succeeds where authors as great as Conrad have failed. Our narrator does not tell a straight, linear story. No. He forgets things, comes back to them later, revives a subject you thought dead and meaningless only to shed new light on it and make it important.
Perhaps the greatest effect the book has is the after-taste. When reading the book, I found it slow and boring. Once I set it down, though, I couldn't stop thinking about it. I had to read it again. And once I began again, I found myself reading it slowly once more, though not from boredom, but rather because I wanted to savor it and take it all in.
I encourage anyone who has begun this book only to find themselves tired of it rather quickly to stick with it. You'll be glad you did. You'll find yourself buying copies for friends to read, as I do. This book truly gets under your skin.
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?
1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Master of irony 6. März 2000
Format:Taschenbuch
Ford's use of irony and juxtaposition is brilliant. He uses the story and the telling of that story to make readers examine their own lives. The reviewer who could not understand how this could be "the saddest story" needs to look beyond the basic plot and examine the narrative voice. The narrator's existence and his distance from reality is the "saddest" part of the book. One of the reasons so many people have difficulty with this book is that they have difficulty understanding the concept of questioning the reliability of the narrator, and this book provides an excellent opportunity for discussion of how far we are to trust the narrative voice of any novel.
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?
3.0 von 5 Sternen A painful narrative of deception and intrigue 12. August 1998
Format:Taschenbuch
Ford has written a clever, painful to read, novel. The narrator describes how he and his wife Florence met another couple they were so compatible with that they spent the next 9 years together. After you are fully convinced that they are all wonderful, you learn that one of them is not at all what he seemed but far more sinister, but that is only from one character's point of view. You then learn It may be that another character is really to blame for the behavior of the first, and so on. As soon as you think you know the characters, they are cast in a new light. At the end, you are not even sure you know the narrator, except that he is shallow and self-deceived. The novel is well written but the characters aren't necessarily believable -- except that you are seeing them through the narrator's eyes and he may be self-deceived.
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?
4.0 von 5 Sternen Story of the destructiveness of realtionships. 3. Juni 1999
Format:Taschenbuch
The sad story of a couple who failed to staisfy each others loves and passions.
Edward, a passionate womanizer, spends his adult life trying to find sexual and emotional satisfaction while his wife, Lenora, trys to "fix" Edward and his indiscretions. Narrated by Dowell, a friend whose emotionless wife is interlocked in a tryst with Edward.
Fascinating story of how people can destroy each other trying to get someone to love them on their terms.
Sometimes I was not sure whether to laugh or cry. Ford uses his words eloquently so that you can understand the emotions of the characters.
I was dissapointed in the character development of Dowell. Although he was a brilliant storyteller, Ford does not let us into the depths of his heart as he did with the other characters.
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?
5.0 von 5 Sternen Is it sad or is it funny? 30. Mai 1998
Format:Taschenbuch
As you can see from the other reviews of this book, it can be looked upon as a tragically romantic tale. Indeed, Ford intially named the novel "The saddest story". Throughout the years, though, there have always been contenders for the view that it is actually a comical book. Whichever, it is a magnificently constructed novel. A tale of adultery, yes, but far removed from today's soap operas and yet so very contemporary. I read it knowing that some see it as a humorous tale. I was struck by the tragedy of it. It does have its funny turns, but as a whole it is certainly the saddest story. When it comes to telling a story, Ford does what his old buddy Conrad tried to do but never achieved...
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?
Möchten Sie weitere Rezensionen zu diesem Artikel anzeigen?
Waren diese Rezensionen hilfreich?   Wir wollen von Ihnen hören.
Die neuesten Kundenrezensionen
4.0 von 5 Sternen Fast service good price
This used book was in good condition and was sent quickly for a very reasonable price.
Veröffentlicht am 26. Juni 2010 von M. Hicks
3.0 von 5 Sternen saddest narrator ever
This is not war fiction. It is a soap opera, of rich people who subsume their longing, fear, religion, everything, to decorum. Lesen Sie weiter...
Veröffentlicht am 9. Juli 2000 von AMH
4.0 von 5 Sternen Blend of psychological insights and caricatures
This book seemed like "A Tale of Passivity" or "The Most Pathetic Story." Engagingly written, with tawdry doings progressively exposed by the wimpish narrator,... Lesen Sie weiter...
Am 8. März 2000 veröffentlicht
2.0 von 5 Sternen Boring, bland and absurd
It is understood that The Good Soldier is a piece of modernism. I have no problem with that. However, this book did not touch me. Lesen Sie weiter...
Veröffentlicht am 23. Februar 2000 von D. Roberts
5.0 von 5 Sternen Influenced me as a writer as much as any I've ever read..
I read this novel years ago and it has stayed with me like a personal experience of my own. I still think of it as a sob stuck in one's breast - and yet I can say that I did not... Lesen Sie weiter...
Veröffentlicht am 15. Dezember 1999 von martha woodworth
5.0 von 5 Sternen The Greatest Modernist Work
It is essentially a simple story, but it is done so creatively through the use of a non-linear story line and multiple perspectives that it becomes a complex analysis of human... Lesen Sie weiter...
Am 4. September 1999 veröffentlicht
4.0 von 5 Sternen Like it more and more as it settles.
While reading this book, I was intrigued but not blown away. Nothing in the story moved me one way or the other. I was pretty indifferent. Lesen Sie weiter...
Am 19. Juli 1999 veröffentlicht
5.0 von 5 Sternen excellent
this has to be the most well strctured book i've ever read. the way it folds out as he is telling it is superb. Lesen Sie weiter...
Am 4. Mai 1999 veröffentlicht
3.0 von 5 Sternen Who would put up with that?
Well, maybe if your name is Hillary! I liked the book because a story was being told as opposed to unfolding. It was a nice change. Lesen Sie weiter...
Am 4. März 1999 veröffentlicht
Kundenrezensionen suchen
Nur in den Rezensionen zu diesem Produkt suchen

Kunden diskutieren

Das Forum zu diesem Produkt
Diskussion Antworten Jüngster Beitrag
Noch keine Diskussionen

Fragen stellen, Meinungen austauschen, Einblicke gewinnen
Neue Diskussion starten
Thema:
Erster Beitrag:
Eingabe des Log-ins
 

Kundendiskussionen durchsuchen
Alle Amazon-Diskussionen durchsuchen
   


Ähnliche Artikel finden