In weniger als einer Minute können Sie mit dem Lesen von The Embodied Mind: Cognitive Science and Human Experience auf Ihrem Kindle beginnen. Sie haben noch keinen Kindle? Hier kaufen Oder fangen Sie mit einer unserer gratis Kindle Lese-Apps sofort an zu lesen.

An Ihren Kindle oder ein anderes Gerät senden

 
 
 

Kostenlos testen

Jetzt kostenlos reinlesen

An Ihren Kindle oder ein anderes Gerät senden

Jeder kann Kindle Bücher lesen  selbst ohne ein Kindle-Gerät  mit der KOSTENFREIEN Kindle App für Smartphones, Tablets und Computer.
The Embodied Mind: Cognitive Science and Human Experience (English Edition)
 
 

The Embodied Mind: Cognitive Science and Human Experience (English Edition) [Kindle Edition]

Eleanor Rosch , Evan Thompson , Francisco J. Varela
5.0 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (3 Kundenrezensionen)

Kindle-Preis: EUR 19,09 Inkl. MwSt. und kostenloser drahtloser Lieferung über Amazon Whispernet

Weitere Ausgaben

Amazon-Preis Neu ab Gebraucht ab
Kindle Edition EUR 19,09  
Gebundene Ausgabe --  
Taschenbuch EUR 26,80  


Produktbeschreibungen

Pressestimmen

"Our concern is to open a space of possibilities in which the circulation between cognitive science and human experience can be fully appreciated and to foster the transformative possibilities of human experience in a scientific culture." the authors " The Embodied Mind is a thoroughly original integration of cognitive science, continental philosophy, and Buddhist thought, and in its transpersonal dimension, rather beautiful." Gordon G. Globus , M.D., Professor of Psychiatry and Philosophy, University of California, Irvine "An important book with wideranging implications for the construction of subjectivity in the Western tradition. Moreover, it is engagingly written, presenting difficult ideas and complex research programs with grace, lucidity, and style. N. Katherine Hayles , American Book Review

Pressestimmen

"Our concern is to open a space of possibilities in which the circulation between cognitive science and human experience can be fully appreciated and to foster the transformative possibilities of human experience in a scientific culture." the authors " The Embodied Mind is a thoroughly original integration of cognitive science, continental philosophy, and Buddhist thought, and in its transpersonal dimension, rather beautiful." Gordon G. Globus , M.D., Professor of Psychiatry and Philosophy, University of California, Irvine "An important book with wideranging implications for the construction of subjectivity in the Western tradition. Moreover, it is engagingly written, presenting difficult ideas and complex research programs with grace, lucidity, and style. N. Katherine Hayles , American Book Review

Produktinformation

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • Dateigröße: 3866 KB
  • Seitenzahl der Print-Ausgabe: 308 Seiten
  • Verlag: The MIT Press; Auflage: New edition (13. November 1992)
  • Verkauf durch: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ASIN: B004VLW386
  • Text-to-Speech (Vorlesemodus): Aktiviert
  • X-Ray:
  • Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung: 5.0 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (3 Kundenrezensionen)
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: #220.979 Bezahlt in Kindle-Shop (Siehe Top 100 Bezahlt in Kindle-Shop)

  •  Ist der Verkauf dieses Produkts für Sie nicht akzeptabel?

Mehr über die Autoren

Entdecken Sie Bücher, lesen Sie über Autoren und mehr

Kundenrezensionen

4 Sterne
0
3 Sterne
0
2 Sterne
0
1 Sterne
0
5.0 von 5 Sternen
5.0 von 5 Sternen
Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen
1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen 18 Years After 20. Februar 2009
Format:Taschenbuch|Verifizierter Kauf
18 Years After
----------------
Writing a short review of a book 18 years aftere its original publishing can raise some questions. But there are books which are worth to remember.

COGNITIVE SCIENCE AND BUDDHISM

When the book 'The Embodied Mind (TEM)' by Varela, Thompson, and Rosch appeared in 1991 this was an impressive synopsis of main lines of research in the cognitive sciences, but also a critical review of important positions. This resulted into at least two important working hypotheses which gained a strong influence in the years following the publication until today. The one hypothesis centered around the term 'embodied cognition' and the other around the term 'naturalistic drift'. These topics alone can give you an exciting time reading this book. But there is something which makes this book really unique: following the new insights into a very dynamic view of human experience they try to show how a certain variant of Buddhist thinking and practice could be of help in living such an open minded existence. What does this mean?

EMBODIED COGNITION

To understand this one has to explain a bit more that the idea of 'embodied cognition' results from the insight into the process of cognition: the authors try to show that there is not a pre-given world of objects which than are represented in the mind, but that the 'objects of the consciousness' are the result of complex processes where properties of the environment are processed by the body and the brain into certain patterns of activity which function as the 'objects of the world'. But these 'objects in the consciousness' are something 'new', 'productions of the body' which have no direct counterpart in the environment, although they are not completely independent of the world.
Lesen Sie weiter... ›
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?
5.0 von 5 Sternen grundlegendes werk zu "embodiment"! 28. Januar 2014
Format:Taschenbuch|Verifizierter Kauf
ein ausnahmslos empfehlenswertes buch. in sich abwechselnden kapiteln werden neurologische erkenntnisse und buddhismus aufeinander bezogen - kapitel zu letzterem fand ich teilweise etwas langatmig. dennoch ein buch, welches eine ausgesprochen überraschende und interessante perspektive auf zusammenhänge zwischen dem großen und dem kleinen in der welt herstellt.
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?
3 von 7 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen This book is amazing! 15. April 1998
Von Ein Kunde
Format:Taschenbuch
This ranks up there with Chogyam Trungpa's books for clearly presented insights. Trunpa's genius is making Buddhist ideas come alive for Western readers by clearly presenting Buddhist ideas in everyday terms. This book is a wonderful addition to the same delicious feast, building a bridge from Eastern mindfulness/awareness traditions to Western scientific thought. The effect is to improve our understanding of both. Very powerful and thought-provoking. Each page is like a meal. Hungry? Chew this one slowly and enjoy every bite!
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?
Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen auf Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.7 von 5 Sternen  9 Rezensionen
86 von 90 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Saving the World Through Buddhism and Brain Science 13. Januar 2008
Von James Gerofsky - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch|Verifizierter Kauf
This is perhaps the most challenging and unusual book I ever read. At first it seems similar to the other books on mind and consciousness that started appearing in the late 1980s, in response to advances in neurobiology and artificial intelligence. But the final chapters confirm that the authors were shooting for something much grander.

The writers of this book, which was first published in 1991, were a "dream team" of philosopher, psychologist, and neuroscientist (the late, great Francisco Varela). They wrote for a professional audience. An interested layperson having some familiarity with philosophy of mind issues can keep up, but only with much effort; I had to stop several times to look up a term or research an important concept. But it's worth the effort. You will review a wide variety of interesting ideas and be shown how they relate to one other, including neural networks, societies of mind, object-relations psychoanalysis, adaptive resource theory, multi-chromatic vision, evolutionary drift, nihilism, the delusion of "self", and much more.

And you will also read about Buddhism. The authors introduce Buddhist concepts every second or third chapter, noting the parallels between ancient thought and modern science (and the failures of western philosophy). Yes, this does remind one of Capra`s Tao of Physics, although the conceptual juxtapositions aren't as forced. The two biggest problems that cognitive science present for western thought involve the failure to integrate and account for subjective experience, and an increasing sense of social groundlessness as science and history reveal the world to be mostly "relative". Varela and his team believe that these problems lie at the root of a major social crisis that is now being felt in the developed world, i.e. a growing sense of nihilism. When despair and confusion become prevalent and our enemies are at the gates, can the new dark ages be far behind?

The response to this gathering storm, the authors argue, can be found in the wisdom of the Buddhist tradition. However, this isn't your father's Buddhism. Varela and company have cleaned it of any supernatural accretions such as hungry ghosts, cosmic nirvana and reincarnation. And although karma is discussed, its definition is narrowed so that it could appear in any graduate textbook on psychology without objection.

The Buddhism presented in this book appears to be fully compatible with our modern scientific viewpoint. Through awareness meditation techniques, subjective experience can be grasped and integrated in a way consistent with empiricism. And in that grasping, we can learn to stop grasping. (Love those eastern paradoxes). Instead of fighting the relativity introduced over time by Einstein, quantum physics, psychoanalysis, evolution, complexity theory and cognitive research, we can learn to embrace the end of grounding. Our science can be enriched through "embodiment", expanding science's conceptual boundaries so as to embrace subjective experience without losing precision and explanatory power. And we ourselves can learn to give up the unsustainable concept of "self" and become more open-hearted and compassionate (those words are used more than once by the authors). We can work with our everyday experiences in ways that are "liberating and transformative".

I've read some professional reviews of this book, most notably by the famous neuro-philosopher Daniel Dennett. They focus on the many technical and research-oriented discussions, and generally ignore the chapters on liberation and compassion. There is so much here regarding the techniques and directions of cognitive research that one can easily ignore the hub and concentrate on the spokes.

The cognitive field appears to have responded to these spokes, i.e. to the need to take "embodiment" and subjective experience more seriously. Neuroscientists Antonio Damasio and Gerald Edelman have discussed the need to conceptualize consciousness in light of the overall human body and its "stay alive" dynamics. Even arch-representationalist Dennett became interested in "hetrophenomenology", which seeks to document a person's subjective feelings and impressions, though not without a certain distance and skepticism.

But getting back to the axis of this book - i.e. saving the world - I will now attempt to go where better minds than my own have feared to tread. First off, one can sense a truly good intent on the part of these authors. They pictured a bridge between eastern and western ideas that could allegedly convey our half-civilized, half-atavistic species toward a more mature state of collective mind and individual being. They honestly felt that brain research had reached the point where it had something earthshaking to say to humankind, once catalyzed through the wisdom of the east. They wrote this book with a sincere sense of hope and purpose. Books like this are rare, especially in the cognitive science field.

Unfortunately, science and critical thought are not compatible with the Buddhist notions presented in this book, however denuded of supernaturalism. The authors call Buddhism a "case study" regarding the positive social effects of embracing groundlessness. Unfortunately, they don't provide a citation to that case study. I'm sure that awareness meditation, the annihilation of self, and the cessation of grasping desire have helped many people to live better lives. But as to whether it works on the scale of a particular culture, or nation, or for humankind as a whole - can we answer that question? And even if we can, what would the side-effects be? Less innovation and economic wealth? Or extreme exploitation by a cabal of charlatans, as happened with Communism? We won't be fooled again? Although Buddhism is not a religion in the same sense as Christianity and Islam, Varela and company still urge a leap of faith upon the reader.

I would recommend this book to anyone even vaguely interested in the issues of the mind - but be ready for a long, tough slog. Despite all the cold technical jargon and talk of emptiness, a sincere human warmth and idealism eventually comes forth. It's kind of like listening to John Lennon's Imagine - except that these authors couldn't expect nearly the payday (and possessions) that Lennon got for his Utopian formula.
59 von 69 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Philosophy of the Body 19. Dezember 2003
Von Kirsten Jacobson - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch
Reading this book contributed helpfully to my studies of the phenomenology of the embodied experience. The authors argue that we cannot understand ourselves to be isolated bodies controlled by a mind that stands apart from and judges an independent environment. I would recommend this book to anyone who is interested in cognitive science, phenomenological philosophy, philosophies of embodiment, and the relationship of Buddhism to these areas of thought.
12 von 14 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen These are a few of my favorite things... 17. März 2013
Von Brian C. - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch
This book combines four of my very favorite things: Maurice Merleau-Ponty, Buddhism, dynamic systems theory, and neuroscience. I am not, therefore, the most objective reviewer. I had already bought into the authors' project before I picked up the book. I am convinced that recent developments in neuroscience and the spread of Buddhism to the West are two of the most important historical developments of the last century. I think they are both going to be extremely important in shaping the world that is currently coming to birth. So I am all for the attempt to combine the two particularly when one of my favorite philosophers (Maurice Merleau-Ponty) is thrown in the mix for good measure.

The authors of this book are attempting to do many things all at once: to chart a middle path between objectivism and subjectivism, find a solution to the problem of nihilism that attends the collapse of objectivism and belief in a unified self, combine the insights of modern neuroscience with the insights of what they call the mindfulness/meditation traditions of Buddhism, and to present their own embodied/enactive research program and contrast it with other research programs in cognitive science. The authors are fairly successful in all of their tasks, although I think they are more successful in some than in others.

I am not going to try to outline the whole book. I am simply going to point out why I think this book is a really important work even for those who are not necessarily interested in the philosophy of mind. I think the authors of this book are grappling with what I consider to be the most important philosophical problems at our current historical moment. These are problems relating to realism and anti-realism in the philosophy of science, reductionism and anti-reductionism, foundationalism and anti-foundationalism, nihilism, and our understanding of our own identity in light of developments in modern neuroscience. I am a graduate student in philosophy and these are the questions that are lighting up the academy at the moment, and they are the questions along which dividing lines are being drawn. You are either a realist or an anti-realist (witness the new "speculative realism" that is gaining momentum in Continental philosophy), a reductionist or an anti-reductionist, you either believe in meaning or you believe in the semantic apocalypse (a term I have stolen from R. Scott Bakker's interesting book Neuropath). Battle lines are being drawn and it is (apparently) necessary to choose a side.

These debates are not confined within the academy. These are pressing questions that non-philosophers are interested in as well. What room is there for traditional religious belief in the light of modern science? What is the status of our everyday self-understanding in the light of modern science? This book is primarily a book on the philosophy of mind, but it is grappling in a profound way with all of these wider questions, and, I think, the authors chart precisely the path that needs to be followed in dealing with these questions. They are following the advice of the Buddhists and charting a middle path between all the positions and their anti-positions.

I will just give one example of how they do this. The notion that there is a self-identical self that underlies all of our various acts of cognition and all of our experience is currently under attack from neuroscience. This has led to a really strong reaction, especially from philosophers, who have attempted to temper neurosciences claims, or question its methods. In my opinion, philosophy (at least Continental philosophy) has tended to adopt a fairly reactionary standpoint in relation to neuroscience. The problem I see with this stance is that it cuts off insights flowing from neuroscience since neuroscience is often treated as if it was the enemy rather than a possible source of new insights. I do not think that is a viable path though the fear may be legitimate. The fear is that neuroscience is going to reduce the self out of existence along with a lot of other things like meaning. This fear is beautifully illustrated in the novel Neuropath by R. Scott Bakker which I already referenced. If you want to know why so many philosophers are so afraid of neuroscience I would definitely recommend reading R. Scott Bakker's book. R. Scott Bakker essentially takes the reductionist argument to its logical conclusion and the world he creates is a nightmare.

So, the tendency has been to try to defend some irreducible realm (first-person experience, meaning, self-identity) from the reductionist tendencies of neuroscience. I think that is a losing battle. The authors of this book choose a different path. Rather than rejecting the insights of neuroscience, they combine them with the insights of Buddhism. Buddhism has been proclaiming the illusion of self-identity for a long time but, according to the Buddhists, the insight into the selflessness of all existence does not lead to nihilism. It leads to enlightenment. So what constitutes the difference? Why does one view lead to the nightmare world of the psychopath, and the other lead to enlightenment? Well, to simplify the thesis of the authors a great deal, the neuroscientist does not take groundlessness far enough. The reductionist is treating the self as an object like any other object but has not achieved the insight into the groundlessness of the object itself.

The phenomenologists and objectivists are just adopting two sides of the same coin. The phenomenologist attempts to rescue the self from reduction by having the subject constitute the object, while the objectivist reduces the self out of existence in favor of the object. The embodied/enactive approach outlined in this book adopts the middle path by treating the self and object as codependently arising. The authors give a very interesting example of the coevolution of the wasp and the flower in order to illustrate the codependent origination of cognition and object. Neither is ground for the other. This calls for some really fundamental alterations in the dominant research program in cognitive science. The standard research program in cognitive science tends to be "How does the mind represent a pre-given world?" From the embodied/enactive approach there is no pre-given world that cognition has to represent. The authors of the book analyze in detail the phenomena of color vision and conclude that there is not really anything that corresponds to our color distinctions in the real world. These are distinctions that we construct in our effort to get along in the world. The subject and object are interdependent. This rescues the relative truth in both standpoints.

Obviously a lot more could be said. This is, clearly, a very inadequate summary of the authors approach. I genuinely believe, however, that the authors research program in this book is not only the best available research program for cognitive science (in full disclosure: philosophy of mind and cognitive science are not my areas of expertise), I also think the authors outline the only possible path in relation to the problems of realism/anti-realism, reductionism/anti-reductionism, and nihilism, that are the current focus of so much philosophical debate. That is why I think this book is such an important book even if philosophy of mind is not your primary interest.
14 von 17 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Buddhism and CogSci 7. Oktober 2007
Von Michael Staples - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch
This book is well worth the price if you are interested in theories of mind and Buddhism. Bert Dreyfus took some of the philosophical references to task in a review that appeared in "Mind" indicating a couple of questions concerning references to Kant's philosophy. He also points out that there is no case made in the book to support the inference that experiences derived from zazen are experiences of "reality." So there are some holes here and there...or maybe assumptions a philosopher would jump on. But I would still recommend this book. It is very interesting and lays out its facit of the Buddhist perspective quite well.
65 von 89 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen This book is amazing! 15. April 1998
Von Ein Kunde - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch
This ranks up there with Chogyam Trungpa's books for clearly presented insights. Trunpa's genius is making Buddhist ideas come alive for Western readers by clearly presenting Buddhist ideas in everyday terms. This book is a wonderful addition to the same delicious feast, building a bridge from Eastern mindfulness/awareness traditions to Western scientific thought. The effect is to improve our understanding of both. Very powerful and thought-provoking. Each page is like a meal. Hungry? Chew this one slowly and enjoy every bite!
Waren diese Rezensionen hilfreich?   Wir wollen von Ihnen hören.
Kundenrezensionen suchen
Nur in den Rezensionen zu diesem Produkt suchen

Beliebte Markierungen

 (Was ist das?)
&quote;
"The world is inseparable from the subject, but from a subject which is nothing but a project of the world, and the subject is inseparable from the world, but from a world which the subject itself projects."2 &quote;
Markiert von 13 Kindle-Nutzern
&quote;
The fundamental insight of the enactive approach as explored in this book is to be able to see our activities as reflections of a structure without losing sight of the directness of our own experience. &quote;
Markiert von 11 Kindle-Nutzern
&quote;
We propose as a name the term enactwe to emphasize the growing conviction that cognition is not the representation of a pregiven world by a pregiven mind but is rather the enactment of a world and a mind on the basis of a history of the variety of actions that a being in the world performs. &quote;
Markiert von 10 Kindle-Nutzern

Kunden diskutieren

Das Forum zu diesem Produkt
Diskussion Antworten Jüngster Beitrag
Noch keine Diskussionen

Fragen stellen, Meinungen austauschen, Einblicke gewinnen
Neue Diskussion starten
Thema:
Erster Beitrag:
Eingabe des Log-ins
 

Kundendiskussionen durchsuchen
Alle Amazon-Diskussionen durchsuchen
   


Ähnliche Artikel finden