The Devil In The White City und über 1,5 Millionen weitere Bücher verfügbar für Amazon Kindle. Erfahren Sie mehr
EUR 11,95
  • Alle Preisangaben inkl. MwSt.
Nur noch 15 auf Lager (mehr ist unterwegs).
Verkauf und Versand durch Amazon.
Geschenkverpackung verfügbar.
Menge:1
Ihren Artikel jetzt
eintauschen und
EUR 0,30 Gutschein erhalten.
Möchten Sie verkaufen?
Zur Rückseite klappen Zur Vorderseite klappen
Anhören Wird wiedergegeben... Angehalten   Sie hören eine Probe der Audible-Audioausgabe.
Weitere Informationen
Alle 3 Bilder anzeigen

The Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic, and Madness at the Fair that Changed America (Englisch) Taschenbuch – 10. Februar 2004


Alle 24 Formate und Ausgaben anzeigen Andere Formate und Ausgaben ausblenden
Amazon-Preis Neu ab Gebraucht ab
Kindle Edition
"Bitte wiederholen"
Taschenbuch, 10. Februar 2004
EUR 11,95
EUR 9,27 EUR 0,91
65 neu ab EUR 9,27 24 gebraucht ab EUR 0,91

Wird oft zusammen gekauft

The Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic, and Madness at the Fair that Changed America + In the Garden of Beasts: Love, Terror, and an American Family in Hitler's Berlin
Preis für beide: EUR 24,90

Die ausgewählten Artikel zusammen kaufen
Jeder kann Kindle Bücher lesen — selbst ohne ein Kindle-Gerät — mit der KOSTENFREIEN Kindle App für Smartphones, Tablets und Computer.


Produktinformation

  • Taschenbuch: 464 Seiten
  • Verlag: Vintage; Auflage: Reprint (10. Februar 2004)
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ISBN-10: 9780375725609
  • ISBN-13: 978-0375725609
  • ASIN: 0375725601
  • Größe und/oder Gewicht: 13,2 x 2,3 x 20,2 cm
  • Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung: 4.3 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (7 Kundenrezensionen)
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: Nr. 21.426 in Fremdsprachige Bücher (Siehe Top 100 in Fremdsprachige Bücher)
  • Komplettes Inhaltsverzeichnis ansehen

Mehr über den Autor

Entdecken Sie Bücher, lesen Sie über Autoren und mehr

Produktbeschreibungen

Amazon.de

Author Erik Larson imbues the incredible events surrounding the 1893 Chicago World's Fair with such drama that readers may find themselves checking the book's categorization to be sure that The Devil in the White City is not, in fact, a highly imaginative novel. Larson tells the stories of two men: Daniel H. Burnham, the architect responsible for the fair's construction, and H.H. Holmes, a serial killer masquerading as a charming doctor. Burnham's challenge was immense. In a short period of time, he was forced to overcome the death of his partner and numerous other obstacles to construct the famous "White City" around which the fair was built. His efforts to complete the project, and the fair's incredible success, are skillfully related along with entertaining appearances by such notables as Buffalo Bill Cody, Susan B. Anthony, and Thomas Edison. The activities of the sinister Dr. Holmes, who is believed to be responsible for scores of murders around the time of the fair, are equally remarkable. He devised and erected the World's Fair Hotel, complete with crematorium and gas chamber, near the fairgrounds and used the event as well as his own charismatic personality to lure victims. Combining the stories of an architect and a killer in one book, mostly in alternating chapters, seems like an odd choice but it works. The magical appeal and horrifying dark side of 19th-century Chicago are both revealed through Larson's skillful writing. --John Moe -- Dieser Text bezieht sich auf eine andere Ausgabe: Gebundene Ausgabe .

Pressestimmen

“Engrossing . . . exceedingly well documented . . . utterly fascinating.” —Chicago Tribune

“A dynamic, enveloping book. . . . Relentlessly fuses history and entertainment to give this nonfiction book the dramtic effect of a novel. . . . It doesn’t hurt that this truth is stranger than fiction.” --The New York Times

"So good, you find yourself asking how you could not know this already." —Esquire

“Another successful exploration of American history. . . . Larson skillfully balances the grisly details with the far-reaching implications of the World’s Fair.”—USA Today

“As absorbing a piece of popular history as one will ever hope to find.”—San Francisco Chronicle

“Paints a dazzling picture of the Gilded Age and prefigure the American century to come.”—Entertainment Weekly

“A wonderfully unexpected book. . . Larson is a historian . . . with a novelist’s soul.”—Chicago Sun-Times

Welche anderen Artikel kaufen Kunden, nachdem sie diesen Artikel angesehen haben?


In diesem Buch (Mehr dazu)
Ausgewählte Seiten ansehen
Buchdeckel | Copyright | Inhaltsverzeichnis | Auszug | Stichwortverzeichnis
Hier reinlesen und suchen:

Kundenrezensionen

4.3 von 5 Sternen
Sagen Sie Ihre Meinung zu diesem Artikel

Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen

4 von 4 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von Dr. Thomas Hart am 26. März 2006
Format: Taschenbuch
One of these books where you wonder why you have never heard of any part of the story: the Chicago Columbian Exposition (World Expo, we would call it today, I guess) is one of the more forgotten ones outside the US. The mass murders of one Mr Holmes (the most frequently used name, there were others) must also have gotten lost under more illustrious cases such as those by Jack the Ripper or the more recent ones. But the book, let's give it that, manages to convey the feeling for the bigness and also in a way the greatness of both events. The way America was expecting something that would cast a shadow over the glorious Paris World Expo and its Eiffel Tower, the way American cities tried everything they could, at the same time, to keep each other from getting the deal, the jealousy among the architects and the ridiculous elephantiasis of committees and administration that almost kept the fair from happening. If you step back a bit and look at the issue from the distance, you will not see anything that would be very extraordinary in the course of preparation for such a huge event. Setbacks and small catastrophes. Casualties and missed deadlines. Spectacular innovations (Ferris Wheel) and incredulity towards its realisation. Erik Larson manages to draw you inside, however, and allows you to get a feeling for the huge task at hand, how unlikely it appears that one person (Burnham, the chief architect) should bear this responsibility. The psycopathic killer story, in contrast to that, sounds too much like a thing out of an Amazon bestseller list thriller, it never evokes the same feeling of realism, of being near.Lesen Sie weiter... ›
Kommentar War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein Feedback senden...
Vielen Dank für Ihr Feedback. Wenn diese Rezension unangemessen ist, informieren Sie uns bitte darüber.
Wir konnten Ihre Stimmabgabe leider nicht speichern. Bitte erneut versuchen
9 von 10 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von Mark Tapley am 24. August 2009
Format: Taschenbuch
Liest man Titel und Umschlag, so denkt man es handelt sich um einen Krimi mit historischer Vorlage. Dem ist leider nicht so. Das Hauptaugenmerk des Autors liegt nicht auf dem Serienmörder H.H Holmes, sondern auf der Weltausstellung in Chicago. Mit der Akribie des Historikers erläutert der Autor die Planung und Durchführung dieses gigantischen Vorhabens. Diese Akribie verhindert jedoch, dass die Protagonisten lebendig wirken oder einem ans Herz wachsen. Das ist auch der Grund, wieso dieser Teil des Buches schlichtweg langweilig ist.
Mich interessierte vor allem die Geschichte um den Unhold Holmes. Leider geht Larson nur in einem kleinen Teil wirklich auf diese Morde ein. Er schildert kurz und knapp die Morde und das Vorgehen von Holmes und verwendet ausschließlich historisch gesicherte Fakten. Auch, wie die Polizei schließlich dem Mörder auf die Schliche kommt, wird sehr nüchtern erzählt ohne, dass je ein Spannungsbogen entsteht.
Wer einen historischen Krimi mit spannender Handlung erwartet wird hier bitter enttäuscht. Ein interessanteres Buch ist sicher Arthur & George von Julian Barnes, in dem ein historischer Kriminalfall spannend erzählt wird.
Kommentar War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein Feedback senden...
Vielen Dank für Ihr Feedback. Wenn diese Rezension unangemessen ist, informieren Sie uns bitte darüber.
Wir konnten Ihre Stimmabgabe leider nicht speichern. Bitte erneut versuchen
1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von TeensReadToo am 24. Februar 2011
Format: Taschenbuch
In 1893, Chicago was gearing up for its shining moment on the international stage. The city had been selected to host the World's Fair, beating out New York and a number of other American contenders. A prominent local architect, Daniel Burnham, had taken the reins to organize and construct the massive project. He assembled a dream team of architects, landscapers, engineers, and other professionals to help pull the fair together. Certainly Chicago could outdo the Paris Fair, which had been a worldwide success years earlier.

Unfortunately for Burnham and his team, everything that could go wrong, did go wrong. Due to a lack of organization and bickering among the committees responsible for the fair, construction began far later than it should have. Partially completed buildings blew over and burned down. Union workers threatened strikes. One sideshow act showed up a year early, while another (which was believed to be made up of cannibals) killed the man sent to retrieve them and never showed up at all. And there was a monster on the loose. A man who used the chaos of Chicago at this time in history to conceal the murders of dozens of people - many of them young, single women. A man who constructed a building with stolen money, then used the building as a slaughterhouse to lure, kill, and dispose of his victims.

THE DEVIL IN THE WHITE CITY is a terrific book. It is nonfiction, but it reads like a novel. The real-life details of this story seem almost too bizarre to be true, yet this is one example of the old saying that "truth is stranger than fiction." The author, Erik Larson, even includes a lengthy section at the back where he documents his facts and explains his suppositions.
Lesen Sie weiter... ›
Kommentar War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein Feedback senden...
Vielen Dank für Ihr Feedback. Wenn diese Rezension unangemessen ist, informieren Sie uns bitte darüber.
Wir konnten Ihre Stimmabgabe leider nicht speichern. Bitte erneut versuchen
Von Cathrin Bunkelmann am 12. April 2013
Format: Taschenbuch Verifizierter Kauf
Ein absolut faszinierendes Buch, das einem die Zeit der Jahrhundertwende in Chicago nahebringt. Auch ohne den Plot des psychopathischen Frauenmörders hochinteressant. Wer einen klassischen Krimi erwartet, könnte enttäuscht sein, wer offen dafür ist, ein Stück Zeitgeschichte zu erleben, den wird die Fülle der Informationen und die lebendige Schreibweise sicher begeistern.
Kommentar War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein Feedback senden...
Vielen Dank für Ihr Feedback. Wenn diese Rezension unangemessen ist, informieren Sie uns bitte darüber.
Wir konnten Ihre Stimmabgabe leider nicht speichern. Bitte erneut versuchen