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The Craftsman (Englisch) Taschenbuch – 1. März 2009


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Produktinformation

  • Taschenbuch: 326 Seiten
  • Verlag: Yale Univ Pr (1. März 2009)
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ISBN-10: 0300151195
  • ISBN-13: 978-0300151190
  • Größe und/oder Gewicht: 23,2 x 15,7 x 2,2 cm
  • Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung: 4.0 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (2 Kundenrezensionen)
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: Nr. 357.395 in Fremdsprachige Bücher (Siehe Top 100 in Fremdsprachige Bücher)

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Produktbeschreibungen

Pressestimmen

'Richard Sennett is a prime observer of society ... one of his great strengths, the thing that makes his narrative so gripping, is the sheer range of his thinking and his brilliance in relating the past to the present' - Fiona MacCarthy, The Guardian 'A lifetime's learning has gone into this book ... Sennett writes beautifully' - Roger Scruton, Sunday Times -- Dieser Text bezieht sich auf eine andere Ausgabe: Taschenbuch .

Synopsis

Why do people work hard, and take pride in what they do? This book, a philosophically-minded enquiry into practical activity of many different kinds past and present, is about what happens when people try to do a good job. It asks us to think about the true meaning of skill in the 'skills society' and argues that pure competition is a poor way to achieve quality work. Sennett suggests, instead, that there is a craftsman in every human being, which can sometimes be enormously motivating and inspiring - and can also in other circumstances make individuals obsessive and frustrated."The Craftsman" shows how history has drawn fault-lines between craftsman and artist, maker and user, technique and expression, practice and theory, and that individuals' pride in their work, as well as modern society in general, suffers from these historical divisions. But the past lives of crafts and craftsmen show us ways of working (using tools, acquiring skills, thinking about materials) which provide rewarding alternative ways for people to utilise their talents. We need to recognise this if motivations are to be understood and lives made as fulfilling as possible.The book divides into three parts: the first addresses the craftsman at work.

This is a story of workshops - the guilds of medieval goldsmiths, the ateliers of musical instrument makers, modern laboratories - in which masters and apprentices work together but not as equals. In its second part the book explores the development of skill: knowledge gained in the hand through touch and movement. A diverse group of case studies illustrates the grounding of skill in physical practice - from striking a piano key to the use of imperfect scientific instruments like the first telescopes or the anatomist's scalpel. The argument of the third part is that motivation counts for more than talent.Enlightenment thinkers believed that everyone possesses the ability to do good work, and that we are more likely to fail as craftsmen due to our motivation than because of our lack of ability. The book assesses and challenges this belief, concluding by considering craftsmanship as more than a technical practice, and considering the ethical questions that craftsmen's sustaining habits raise about how we anchor ourselves in the world around us. -- Dieser Text bezieht sich auf eine vergriffene oder nicht verfügbare Ausgabe dieses Titels.


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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von Andreas Hopf am 28. August 2013
Format: Taschenbuch
A highly recommendable book, it's contents unfortunately often misunderstood for the musings of a closet romantic, which Richard Sennett is clearly not. Careful reading is probably not high on many people's agenda in an age of tl;dr.

Warning! The Penguin paperback edition is marred by off-kilter layout on very many pages and countless wording and spelling mistakes, as if the editor decided the book to act as counterpoint to its content.
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3 von 4 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von hblnk am 15. Juli 2011
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe Verifizierter Kauf
This is a very good book and I urge you to read it.
However, do not buy this particular edition. It is rife with typographical errors and editing mishaps. The proofreading was obviously not done by a craftsman taking pride in his work. Bad to worse, some typos are exactly in spots and phrases where they ruin very fundamental semantic points, which will lead you astray.
By my count there are some fifty serious typos in this edition, or approximately one for every five pages of text. In a book that glorifies attention and skill, this is a bit much.
Make sure to read this text though and do not miss Sennett's two previous ones either.
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Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen auf Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 28 Rezensionen
102 von 106 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Practice What You Preach 21. Juni 2008
Von Vince Leo - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
You name it--Richard Sennett breaks it down. Metamorphosis provoking material consciousness? (Three ways: internal evolution of a type-form, judgment about mixture and synthesis, domain shift). Mirror tools? (Two types: replicant and robot). Sennett combines this penchant for analytic break-down with a treasure trove of stories, examples, and experiences, drilling into craft through the finger movements of pianists, the methodology of cookbook Instructions, and much, much more. The Craftsman isn't so much a proof of thesis as an exploration of category, the perfect platform for a widely read and experienced scholar to play with a vast and varied data set. Even with all that information, Sennet eventually settles on a something approaching an article of faith: that craft isn't about things but about values, not about superior skill but about doing a job well for its own sake. Think of it as a theory of sustainable labor in the age of hyper-capitalism.

My BIG GRIPE with this book is that if Richard Sennett believes so much in craftsmanship, why are there so many typos? DOZENS OF TYPOS. Misspellings. Extra words. Here's the end of the second to the last sentence in the book: "the denouement of this narrative is often marked by marked by bitterness and regret." Ya think? If this book was a car, the dealer would be forced by law to replace it. I'm sure Sennett had nothing to do with this, and that he is mortified that his faith in the practice of craft (proofreading, book-making) has been so blatantly betrayed by his publisher (Yale University Press, of the billions in endowment fame), but frankly, reading this book was to experience cynicism of the highest order: A terrible fate for a story so indebted to a job well done.
80 von 86 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
What happened to editors? 30. Juli 2008
Von RDP - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
While I found the contents of Sennett's book interesting and even, at times, uniquely thought-provoking, reading the book left me bewildered and dismayed: How could a book extolling the virtues of quality in craftsmanship be so poorly edited? Is the manner in which the book is published a purposeful counterpoint to Sennett's basic argument? Without exaggeration, almost every page in the book held one or more instances of unaddressed typographical oversight. In truth, the book read like a poor translation from another language possessing idioms and phraseology totally foreign to English. If this is the best that Yale University Press can do, I will certainly question any future purchases bearing that name. For the prospective buyer, be prepared for a disruptive read.
49 von 52 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
A worthwhile read for managers, for HR people, for craftspeople of all stripes. 15. April 2008
Von D. Stuart - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
Richard Sennett (professor of sociology at New York University and at The London School of Economics) is vitally concerned with the devaluation of human values within the context of the new economy.

We live in an age where management decisions can be very remote, and where people's jobs are displaced wholesale, moved offshore, and where human lives are measured by the bottom-line accounting of large organisations.

What Sennett does is put a stake in the ground by asking rhetorically whether our commitment to work - our craftsmanship - is merely about money, or about something deeper and more human. Of course, the answer is that work commitment - the skill, the care, the late nights, the problem solving and pride that go into our work is a LOT more than about money.

In this book Sennett very clearly and thoughtfully dicusses the vital social currency of craftsmanship (and he uses the term in a modern sense - software programmers are craftspeople too.)

The book is timely, especially in a donwturn economy, and it raises many questions about how we value the people in our society. Craftspeople have been devalued of late - how we celebrate the CEO titans! - but maybe the pendulum needs to swing back the other way.

A worthwhile read for managers, for HR people, for craftspeople of all stripes - and for policy makers and economists. If our society is supposed to be more value-based these days (good corporate citizens, good global citizens) then The Craftsman urges us to look closer to home: at our own good people. Well recommended.

See also:
1 The Corrosion of Character: The Personal Consequences of Work in the New Capitalism
2 Flesh and Stone: The Body and the City in Western Civilization
3 The Fall of Public Man (Open Market Edition)
23 von 25 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Salutary Failure 28. Oktober 2008
Von DRD - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
This was a very good, very flawed book. Sennet's ideas are extremely interesting but he is an deplorable writer. He rambles and mixes metaphors regularly, uses obscure anglicisms and archaisms and odd syntax with dismaying frequency. George Orwell he is not. He sites Hannah Arendt as one of his influences, and I seem to recall she was not the most readable writer either.

Amusingly, he mentions that a work of handicraft should be rough, handmade looking... and his prose is all that! It seems to have been written on a tape recorder. He thanks his manuscript editor in the foreword, he should have fired her, there are sentences that make no sense at all, misspellings, and double entendres.
Maybe he did some of this on purpose, like modern art, so the reader would have to slow down and parse every sentence, who knows? He's like an prophet, he needs someone to interpret him in a more accessible way.

Anyway, I loved his ideas, and think this was a very meaningful book for me personally.
6 von 6 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
An Important Re-framing of an Old Idea 10. Juni 2010
Von J. V. Lewis - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch Verifizierter Kauf
Richard Sennett has been one of my most-preferred interpreters of physical and social culture since Flesh and Stone. He tackles issues that got trampled by misapplications of lit-crit and semiotic theory over the last few decades, and manages to get them back into the discussion. He has a rather dogged style: history, explication, and journalistic fairness are treated like responsibilities in language that is mostly quite dry, even bland. But what he lacks in vivacity, he more than covers with solid, methodical argumentation and a heartening tendency to broaden concepts and include the truly modern. In this volume, for example, Sennett adds Linux programming to the list of what we normally think of as craft, and I think he makes his case. Craft is a wicked thicket for us Moderns: we have not kept pace with its devaluation in an age of competitive production and disposable workers, and the quality of our handwork has suffered, but Sennett also convinces me that our comprehension of the world and the place of humans in it has suffered, because good craft is the meeting of mind and hand. What devalues handwork impoverishes the human mind. We lose our capacity for imagination.

I read this book very closely, pencil in hand, convinced that Sennett has contributed greatly to our understanding of what it means to be human in a machine age. I believe that his work has eclipsed Hannah Arendt's by now. Excellent.
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