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The Corrosion of Character: The Personal Consequences of Work in the New Capitalism [Englisch] [Gebundene Ausgabe]

Richard Sennett
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Kurzbeschreibung

14. Oktober 1998
Drawing on interviews with dismissed IBM executives, bakers in a high-tech bakery, a bar owner turned advertising executive and others, the author explores the disorientating effects of the new capitalism in America. This book explores the contrast between the vanished world of rigid, hierachical organizations, where what mattered was a sense of personal character, and the brave new world of corporate re-engineering, risk, flexibility, networking, and short-term teamwork, where what matters is being able to reinvent yourself at the click of a finger.

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Produktinformation

  • Gebundene Ausgabe: 176 Seiten
  • Verlag: WW Norton & Co; Auflage: EA, (14. Oktober 1998)
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ISBN-10: 0393046788
  • ISBN-13: 978-0393046786
  • Größe und/oder Gewicht: 21,6 x 14,2 x 2 cm
  • Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung: 3.3 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (18 Kundenrezensionen)
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: Nr. 308.582 in Fremdsprachige Bücher (Siehe Top 100 in Fremdsprachige Bücher)
  • Komplettes Inhaltsverzeichnis ansehen

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Produktbeschreibungen

Amazon.de

In the brave new world of the "flexible" corporation, Richard Sennett observes, workers at all levels are regarded as wholly disposable, and they have responded in kind, ceasing to think in terms of any long-term relationship with the organizations they work for. This, he argues, has tremendous negative consequences for workers' emotional and psychological well-being. Even in menial jobs, we extract much of our self-image from the idea of a "career"--a life narrative rendered intelligible by specific loyalties, which is to some degree self-invented but also in some respects predictable. Innovations like "flextime" and bureaucratic "de-layering" seem to promise more freedom to define one's career, but in fact they create jobs in which there's less freedom than ever to be had. The Corrosion of Character is a short, anecdotal book, and while one might wish that it included a discussion of the social and psychological costs of the sheer increase of work time in the average worker's week, Sennett has created a pithy, disturbing picture of the cost of the corporate world's much-vaunted new efficiencies. --Richard Farr

Synopsis

Drawing on interviews with dismissed IBM executives, bakers in a high-tech bakery, a bar owner turned advertising executive and others, the author explores the disorientating effects of the new capitalism in America. This book explores the contrast between the vanished world of rigid, hierachical organizations, where what mattered was a sense of personal character, and the brave new world of corporate re-engineering, risk, flexibility, networking, and short-term teamwork, where what matters is being able to reinvent yourself at the click of a finger.

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2 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
3.0 von 5 Sternen People, like capitalism, can adapt. 2. Juli 1999
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe
Richard Sennett's little book includes many worthy insights. His analysis of risk-taking and community is particularly good. It appears true that in the private sector a short term focus is widespread. For many individuals, life narratives are perhaps getting lost amidst fragmentary episodes of work. Personal character no doubt suffers.
But whose fault is this? Sennett seems to imply that workers are passive victims of institutional structure. Such structures, however, are always changing. Workers may be more resilient than he gives them credit for. Personal narratives are probably intact even though many of them are so different from those of, say, their parents as to be unrecognizable. Then, too, in changing times one may simply have to exert more effort to understand and develop a life narrative. On the basis of Sennett's small sample, assuming too much about the workforce as a whole may be unwise. Do foreign service officers, Oklahoma bankers, Iowa farmers, physicians in Oregon, and school teachers in New Mexico suffer from a diminished sense of identity because of the new capitalism?
I felt swayed by Sennett's argument until I read on p. 116 that, "The classic work ethic of delayed gratification and proving oneself through hard labor can hardly claim our affection." In fact, it does. Even under new circumstances, working hard and delaying gratification in order to achieve a larger goal produces a sense of accomplishment, of self-worth. Similiarly, human beings have a way of seeking out or creating the communities they need. If the office doesn't provide it, or the neighborhood, churches and voluntary associations of all kinds do. Some people simply opt out of work situations which do not provide or allow them the kinds of communities they need.
Capitalism is infinitely changeable and dynamic, but most people are quick to see their options. Quicker perhaps than Mr. Sennett.
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1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe
Amidst the cacophony about the wonders of globalization and the new millennium's everlasting prosperity and bull market, Richard Sennett has the intellectual courage to present some of the negative consequences of global capitalism on a vast number of workers whose skills and dedication the economy and markets depend upon. Jobs are replaced by "projects" and "fields of work" and the moto for organizing working time is "no long-term". As workers are forced to go from one job to another, the new capitalism increases the risk of the workers in choosing employment, while it robs them of the sense of security enjoyed previously and, in Sennett's words, corrodes their character. The book covers the trends and nuances of the new capitalism and with many examples illustrates the decline of job security of both workers and managers, the fact that the fastest growing sector of the labor force is those working on temporary jobs, often called "permatemps", and that the frequent turnover in employment increases the risk of choosing a career or even a job. Richard Sennett correctly concludes that the new order does indeed corrode the worker's character.
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3.0 von 5 Sternen Todays changing workplace 13. Mai 1999
Von Ein Kunde
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe
Richard Sennetts book entitled The Corrosion of Character: The Personal Consquences of Work in the New Capitalism is a well written and informative book about the economic changes and conditions going on in America's workplace today. Sennett uses examples in his book about janitors, IBM workers, and Boston bakers as case studies to get some of his points accross. He paints a picture of how each of these professions has changed over the years. These examples are deeply thought out and explained in detail. He even makes the examples so easy to understand that even a young adult can follow along. The only downside to his book is that the author gives no soloutions to the problems inour changing workforce. He just explains why things are the way they are. If you are intrested in learning about the changes in our workforce, this is a book for you.
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1.0 von 5 Sternen Pointless, wordy, and rambling 20. Oktober 1998
Von Ein Kunde
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe
I wanted to enjoy this book--the subject of modern downsizing fascinates and compels me and there's been a number of solid books recently on the subject...but this isn't one of them. I was misled into believing that on THIS topic, at least, Sennett would be more clear and easier to understand than in those previous books of his which I've read and found highly incomprehensible. His case studies are sketchy, his conclusions are cliched, and his ultimate point is lost in obscurity. Instead, try reading Barbara Rudolph's "Disconnected" for a more personal, accessible look at the subject.
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Von Ein Kunde
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe
Richard Sennett takes a very interesting look at the changing workplace and the possible links to its changes. He looks at the effects that the new workplace has taken on people's lives and their families. He gives vivid comparisons between the past generations and how character had its effect in their jobs and how today's jobs have an effect on character. Sennett doesn't just take a 90's perspective, but instead looks into the past at what the motivations and goals of the workers were centuries before. In 1972 Sennett wrote a book, along with Jonathan Cobb, called "The Hidden Injuries of Class". The book is about a man named Enrico who was a janitor. Enrico's job was both routine and not very mentally challenging. The reason that he was content with his job was because he had goals to improve the lives of his children. His vision canceled out most of the mental and physical drain that his job entailed. He also looks back at when most jobs were what he calls "routine" and what people thought of about habitual labor.
Diderot believed that routine labor was good. He thought that the repetitive actions enabled the worker to become an expert and increasingly develop their skills. He explained that in a factory if each worker were to become an expert at their individual task, that the result would be the best possible product produced at the best possible efficiency. Adam Smith had different views. He believed that routine work "deadened the mind." Sennett points out that today the world has followed Smith's ideas. Pride among the workers has dissipated. When a person starts from the bottom and works to the top they appreciate what they have earned and what they have produced. Today the goal is to skip or zoom past the earning stage.
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2.0 von 5 Sternen A fixation with failing...
Richard Sennett is obviously an erudite man, and (from my perspective) a good writer. But he has written a deeply flawed book. Lesen Sie weiter...
Am 27. Juni 2000 veröffentlicht
5.0 von 5 Sternen timely awareness for capitalist leaders
This little book by Sennett is a well done, interesting case description mingled with theoretical analyses about some problems and afflictions of present time capitalism, that is... Lesen Sie weiter...
Veröffentlicht am 13. April 2000 von Durval Olivieri
4.0 von 5 Sternen Good intro to some ideas
The straight dope on this book is that it is an engaging series of well written essays. The fact that the ideas presented in the book are big ideas makes the terse nature of the... Lesen Sie weiter...
Am 10. Dezember 1999 veröffentlicht
5.0 von 5 Sternen In Praise of Human Experience
I am struck by the visceral and reactive comments in some of the reviews, but this only demonstrates that Sennett has touched a vulnerable nerve among those who have a vested... Lesen Sie weiter...
Veröffentlicht am 12. Mai 1999 von Ronald E. Purser
3.0 von 5 Sternen Interesting book, but incomplete
I bought this book because it was on the Economist's best books of 1998 list and I was a little disappointed (the other books on that list were terrific though). Lesen Sie weiter...
Am 12. April 1999 veröffentlicht
4.0 von 5 Sternen Dangers of production at the dawn of a new century
What prompted me to write this review is the scathing criticim I saw here. Some readers call the book unhistorical and unscientific and it probably is. Lesen Sie weiter...
Veröffentlicht am 28. März 1999 von John Mudd Gonzalez
4.0 von 5 Sternen Well-written, thought-provoking, but anecdotal
Although I typically detest anecdotal social science, I found Sennet's analysis simple and thoughtful. Lesen Sie weiter...
Am 2. März 1999 veröffentlicht
4.0 von 5 Sternen Humanistic insight into the changed world of work
This is a highly readable book, informed by academic insights but not over scholarly. Its merit is that it makes you think-particularly by the chapter segmentations. Lesen Sie weiter...
Am 24. Februar 1999 veröffentlicht
1.0 von 5 Sternen A retread of socialistic class warfare nostrums.
I was expecting a reasoned approach which discussed the changes that people face in today's work environment and perhaps some insight into how one could cope with these changes. Lesen Sie weiter...
Veröffentlicht am 15. Februar 1999 von John E. Thomson
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