The Changing Face of Anti-Semitism und über 1,5 Millionen weitere Bücher verfügbar für Amazon Kindle. Erfahren Sie mehr
EUR 16,05
  • Statt: EUR 17,12
  • Sie sparen: EUR 1,07 (6%)
  • Alle Preisangaben inkl. MwSt.
Auf Lager.
Verkauf und Versand durch Amazon.
Geschenkverpackung verfügbar.
Menge:1
The Changing Face of Anti... ist in Ihrem Einkaufwagen hinzugefügt worden
Ihren Artikel jetzt
eintauschen und
EUR 0,10 Gutschein erhalten.
Möchten Sie verkaufen?
Zur Rückseite klappen Zur Vorderseite klappen
Anhören Wird wiedergegeben... Angehalten   Sie hören eine Probe der Audible-Audioausgabe.
Weitere Informationen
Dieses Bild anzeigen

The Changing Face of Anti-Semitism: From Ancient Times to the Present Day (Englisch) Taschenbuch – 30. Juni 2008


Alle 5 Formate und Ausgaben anzeigen Andere Formate und Ausgaben ausblenden
Amazon-Preis Neu ab Gebraucht ab
Kindle Edition
"Bitte wiederholen"
Taschenbuch
"Bitte wiederholen"
EUR 16,05
EUR 9,05 EUR 18,56
12 neu ab EUR 9,05 4 gebraucht ab EUR 18,56

Hinweise und Aktionen

  • Studienbücher: Ob neu oder gebraucht, alle wichtigen Bücher für Ihr Studium finden Sie im großen Studium Special. Natürlich portofrei.

Jeder kann Kindle Bücher lesen — selbst ohne ein Kindle-Gerät — mit der KOSTENFREIEN Kindle App für Smartphones, Tablets und Computer.


Produktinformation

  • Taschenbuch: 240 Seiten
  • Verlag: Oxford University Press, U.S.A. (30. Juni 2008)
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ISBN-10: 019534121X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0195341218
  • Größe und/oder Gewicht: 20,1 x 2 x 13,5 cm
  • Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung: 4.0 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (2 Kundenrezensionen)
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: Nr. 621.612 in Fremdsprachige Bücher (Siehe Top 100 in Fremdsprachige Bücher)
  • Komplettes Inhaltsverzeichnis ansehen

Mehr über den Autor

Entdecken Sie Bücher, lesen Sie über Autoren und mehr

Produktbeschreibungen

Pressestimmen

Succinctly summarizes the research and debates on the subject that have been ongoing for many years We are once again indebted to Professor Laqueur for writing a work that is highly informative and very readable. The Jewish Voice and Opinion An interesting general analysis of the variations of anti-Semitism over the past 2000 years... Laqueur's major strength is his critique of contemporary issues, especially the role of Israel in anti-Semitic thought, and the question of the relationship between anti-Zionism and anti-Semitism. Library Journal Well-researched and written by a very perceptive scholar. Especially worth reading and contemplating are the chapters on the modern era. Washington Jewish Week Walter Laqueur provides us with powerful new insights into an age-old problem. Distinguished scholarship and an authoritative moral voice are the hallmarks of this important book. Anyone wanting to understand the history and persistence of anti-Jewish hatred should read it. Abraham H. Foxman, National Director, Anti-Defamation League and author of Never Again?: The Threat of the New Anti-Semitism Once more, Walter Laqueur has brought his formidable learning, incisive style, and sheer brilliance in writing concise and yet gripping history to a subject matter of extraordinary complexity. The result is vintage Laqueur and an extremely valuable contribution to the subject of the history of antisemitism. Michael Stanislawski, Nathan J. Miller Professor of Jewish History, Columbia University Walter Laqueur has written a thoughtful book about a difficult subject, bringing history and his own keen analytical skill together in a new way. Engagingly written, it offers both an overview of the past and an analysis of the 'new antisemitism.' He treats anti-Semitism sympathetically, even as he largely avoids the apologetics that characterize so much writing on the subject. Mark R. Cohen, author of Under Crescent and Cross: The Jews in the Middle Ages A remarkable and eminently readable review of anti-Semitism throughout history from the persecution of the early Israelites in Egypt to the recent attacks on Jewish targets in twenty-first century Europe. Laqueur describes with skill and precision antisemitism's context in every era be it economic, religious, social, or political. A brilliant, lucid and compelling survey of a social, psychological, cultural, political and intellectual malady that has preoccupied and distorted European and Arab societies, Christian and Muslim civilizations, and both the political right and the political left. In this short volume, Laqueur provides an elegant, fast-paced and immensely readable account of a complex, confounding and still-mutating condition that continues to afflict our world. This book is a vital contribution to our understanding of an important and disturbing dimension of our past and, as Laqueur so incisively shows, of our present and our future. There is no other book like it.

Synopsis

For thirty years the director of the Wiener Library in London, the leading institute for the study of anti-Semitism, Walter Laqueur here offers both a comprehensive history of anti-Semitism as well as an illuminating look at the newest wave of this phenomenon. Laqueur begins with an invaluable historical account of this pernicious problem, tracing the evolution from a predominantly religious anti-Semitism--stretching back to the middle ages--to a racial anti-Semitism that developed in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. The author then uses this historical account as backdrop to a brilliant analysis of the newest species of anti-Semitism, explaining its origins and rationale, how it manifests itself, in what ways and why it is different from anti-Semitism in past ages, and what forms it may take in the future. The book reveals that what was historically a preoccupation of Christian and right-wing movements has become in our time even more frequent among Muslims and left-wing groups. Moreover, Laqueur argues that we can't simply equate this new anti-Semitism with anti-Zionism and write it off as merely anti-Israel sentiments.

National and religious minority groups have been systematically persecuted from Indonesia, to Bangladesh, Rwanda, and beyond, but their fate has not generated much indignation in Europe and America. If Israel alone is singled out for heated condemnation, is the root of this reaction simply anti-Zionism or is it anti-Semitism? Here is both a summing up of the entire trajectory of anti-Semitism--the first comprehensive history of its kind--and an exploration of the new wave of anti-Semitism that will be of interest to all concerned about the future of Jews, Judaism, and Israel. -- Dieser Text bezieht sich auf eine andere Ausgabe: Gebundene Ausgabe .


In diesem Buch (Mehr dazu)
Ausgewählte Seiten ansehen
Buchdeckel | Copyright | Inhaltsverzeichnis | Auszug | Stichwortverzeichnis | Rückseite
Hier reinlesen und suchen:

Kundenrezensionen

4.0 von 5 Sternen
5 Sterne
0
4 Sterne
2
3 Sterne
0
2 Sterne
0
1 Sterne
0
Beide Kundenrezensionen anzeigen
Sagen Sie Ihre Meinung zu diesem Artikel

Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen

3 von 3 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von Pieter Uys am 9. Juli 2008
Format: Taschenbuch
This concise survey of antisemitism from the ancient world to the present illumines some unusual angles of the virus' shape-shifting habit as well as its common features in space and time. Spellbinding and thought-provoking, the elegantly worded text in the form of a lengthy essay contributes significantly to the quest of defining the constantly mutating plague. Laqueur is clearly an expert on the judeopathic mindset, occasionally displaying an almost exasperating level of tolerance when examining such evil and despicable thoughts. As a secular academic he is uncertain of the future, speculating at length on possible scenarios in the concluding chapters.

He attributes the earliest manifestations of the affliction in Egypt and classical antiquity to animosity resulting from Jewish cultural practices. But those who respect the "Old Testament" as history will remember that it was fear - judeophobia - of their numbers that led to the oppression & infanticide before the Exodus. In Christianity the virus mutated into an intense theological hatred articulated by numerous "church fathers" like Melito of Sardis, Chrysostom and Augustine and later by reformers like Martin Luther. The accusation of deicide was accompanied by the usurpation of the Tenakh and the idea that the church had replaced the Jews as the chosen of God: the doctrine of replacement theology. The problem grew worse in exact proportion to the influence of Christianity that culminated in the disastrous triumph of the Constantine version.

The next mutation, racial prejudice, arrived with modernity in the 1800s. Now the danger was perceived to inhabit the genes so it followed that physical annihilation was seen as the solution, leading to the Holocaust.
Lesen Sie weiter... ›
Kommentar War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein Feedback senden...
Vielen Dank für Ihr Feedback. Wenn diese Rezension unangemessen ist, informieren Sie uns bitte darüber.
Wir konnten Ihre Stimmabgabe leider nicht speichern. Bitte erneut versuchen
1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von Mario Pf. HALL OF FAME REZENSENTTOP 500 REZENSENT am 15. August 2008
Format: Taschenbuch
Antisemitismus schlicht und einfach als "Judenhass" zu übersetzen ist schnell getan und würde Laqueurs Einstiegsfrage allerdings nicht beantworten, denn zunächst sehe man sich gezwungen festzulegen wer und was da gehasst, ein Angehöriger des jüdischen Glaubens oder eine Ethnie? Anfang des 20. Jahrhunderts galt der Antisemitismus als "Sozialismus der dummen Kerls" und vor allem im deutschen Sprachraum entwickelte sich aus dem früher klerikalen Antisemitismus, der seinen Opfern meist noch die Möglichkeit der Konvertierung oder Assimilation bot, zusammen mit dem völkischen Gedankengut ein ethnischer Antisemitismus, der nun auch Halb- und Vierteljuden kannte, die Konfession stand nicht mehr im Zentrum und es war den Vordenkern und Fußsoldaten des Holocausts ohnehin egal ob man sich für oder gegen den Zionismus als jüdischen Nationalismus aussprach. Heute bekennen sich bezeichnenderweise selbst überzeugte Antisemiten aus der rechten Szene nicht mehr zum Antisemitismus und bestreiten dies oft genug vehement, während sich neben arabisch-nationalistisch und islamistisch-fundamentalistischen Gruppen auch immer mehr Linke zu einem Antizionismus bekennen, dessen Zorn auf Israel immer wieder auch in Hass auf das israelische Volk umschlägt.

Der moderne Antisemitismus ist alles andere als neu, auch wenn er sich im Schlepptau von Globalisierungskritik und US-Kritik für manchen vielleicht einen frischen Anstrich gibt. Das Problem ist, wie Laqueur konstatiert, dass sich die meisten Kritiker schlicht ihren latenten Antisemitismus nicht eingestehen wollen oder aufgrund ihrer politischen Überzeugung, können.
Lesen Sie weiter... ›
Kommentar War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich? Ja Nein Feedback senden...
Vielen Dank für Ihr Feedback. Wenn diese Rezension unangemessen ist, informieren Sie uns bitte darüber.
Wir konnten Ihre Stimmabgabe leider nicht speichern. Bitte erneut versuchen

Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen auf Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 14 Rezensionen
44 von 49 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Best book on Anti-Semitism 8. Oktober 2006
Von Werner Cohn - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe Verifizierter Kauf
As I see it, Laqueur's book has advantages over the many other works on the same subject:

1) The author has a sure footing in two millennia of European history. Here and there I found myself in disagreement on matters of fact and interpretation. I looked these things up and found that in all of these cases Laqueur was right and I was wrong. This is not to say that there won't be specialists who can find errors here and there. There is no book that is immune to error. But I do not think that such errors will be numerous or grave.

2) The author is even-handed and sober. He flogs no ideology or partisan program. He is patient with the views of others, even when these are offensive.

3) He has taken the trouble of studying, in depth, what anti-Semites have to say. There are no second-hand condemnations based on handed-down opinions.

4) He knows the byways of history: shadowy characters like Abram Leon, the National Bolshevists, Michael Neumann, Horst Mahler, to name just a few, wander through these pages. Generally it is only the sectologists -- the historians of Trotskyism, the chroniclers of neo-Nazism, etc. -- who bother to tell us much about such figures. But where sectologists are interested only in these shadows, Laqueur shows us the shadows by way of illuminating the broader picture. He lets us travel both byways and highways.

When the messiah finally arrives, books will be perfect. This has not yet happened, and I must report that, indeed, there are things that I wish were better in this book.

Laqueur has no footnotes and only rarely makes direct reference to other scholars. Most of the time this is not a big problem since the facts that he adduces are generally well known, and, with Wikipedia and other internet resources widely available, a reader can often provide his own references, as indeed I have done. Sometimes, however, a topic cries out for emendation by footnote. On page 49, for example, the author mentions the "Deutsche Christen," a Nazi formation of Protestants who repudiated the Old Testament as Jewish. ("Deutsche Christen" is not found in the book's index.) Well, the reader should have been referred here to more information on this group. As it happens, the group Deutsche Christen was repudiated by the Nazi leadership and lost all influence after 1933, and the reader of the present book will be misled if all he reads is what he reads here.

I am also not happy with the long list of (unannotated) recommended readings. It is too long to be of much help. I would have liked to see a much shorter, annotated list of things that the interested reader should look into.

Laqueur tells us that there are about 40,000 books about modern anti-Semitism. My own overall opinion of his work is best expressed by the fact that I have ordered a copy for each of my nine grandchildren. I have included my youngest, now three, because of my confidence that by the time he reaches reading age for this sort of thing -- roughly ten years from now -- this book will still most likely stand as the best scholarly treatment of anti-Semitism.
26 von 28 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Damned if they do.... 20. März 2008
Von P.K. Ryan - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe Verifizierter Kauf
Laqueur has written a very readable and quite objective account of the history of anti-Semitism, as well as its various manifestations throughout the ages. Why do we need yet another book on anti-Semitism you might ask? Laqueur claims that since WW2, anti-Semitism has transformed yet again, thus this can be considered an updated study on the phenomenon.

I should qualify my statement that he is objective. He is obviously against anti-Semitism but-for the most part-he gives a fair hearing to anti-Semitic arguments, even conceding that some of them do, in fact have an element of truth to them. He starts with a couple introductory chapters and then delves into a chronological history of anti-Semitism beginning with that of the ancient Greeks, Egyptians and Romans. He then contrasts this with the more religious and vindictive character of medieval Christian anti-Semitism. We are then brought through the Enlightenment and the racialist anti-Semitism of the 19th and 20th centuries, and ultimately to contemporary AS. Modern day AS, Laqueur writes, while still a component of far right groups has now manifested itself mainly in far-left and Muslim circles. To the far-left, the Jews represent the power behind the capitalist/imperialist menace that they so despise, as well as an anachronistic, tribal people who pose a threat to the nationless, raceless world that they envision. On the other hand, Muslim AS is heavily caused by the state of Israel and its "relations" with the Palestinians and neighboring Arabs. He points out that this was more of a catalyst though, as there has always been a degree of anti-Semitism in Islamic societies, and Islam itself. He points out something that I had always thought, that Muslims feel especially humiliated by Israel because Jews have always been weak, second-class citizens and while they were generally tolerated in this capacity, their dominance is unacceptable.

He points out that the anti-Semitism of the left is more similar to that of the medieval Catholic Church as opposed to the racialist variety of the 19th and 20th century. This is to say that both the Church and the left offer "salvation through conversion" meaning that they would accept the Jews, as long as they ceased to be Jews. He also makes some interesting points about Israel, showing how their treatment of the Palestinians is consistently singled out for condemnation, while the equally (or worse) harsh plight of numerous other peoples around the world are virtually ignored by the same people.

Laqueur does engage in some speculation and debatable interpretations but this is somewhat expected for this type of work. Overall, I'm not sure there's anything really groundbreaking here, and I highly doubt that Laqueur will sway any dedicated anti-Semites (and that's probably not his intent), but I would consider this a relatively objective, knowledgeable, concise, and up to date summary of the topic.
24 von 33 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Advance Praise for The Changing Face of Antisemitism 23. Mai 2006
Von Publisher - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
"Walter Laqueur provides us with powerful new insights into an age-old problem. Distinguished scholarship and an authoritative moral voice are the hallmarks of this important book. Anyone wanting to understand the history and persistence of anti-Jewish hatred should read it." -- Abraham H. Foxman, National Director, Anti-Defamation League and author of Never Again?: The Threat of the New Anti-Semitism

"Once more, Walter Laqueur has brought his formidable learning, incisive style, and sheer brilliance in writing concise and yet gripping history to a subject matter of extraordinary complexity. The result is vintage Laqueur and an extremely valuable contribution to the subject of the history of antisemitism." -- Michael Stanislawski, Nathan J. Miller Professor of Jewish History, Columbia University

"Walter Laqueur has written a thoughtful book about a difficult subject, bringing history and his own keen analytical skill together in a new way. Engagingly written, it offers both an overview of the past and an analysis of the 'new antisemitism.' He treats antisemitism sympathetically, even as he largely avoids the apologetics that characterize so much writing on the subject." -- Mark R. Cohen, author of Under Crescent and Cross: The Jews in the Middle Ages

"A remarkable and eminently readable review of antisemitism throughout history from the persecution of the early Israelites in Egypt to the recent attacks on Jewish targets in twenty-first century Europe. Laqueur describes with skill and precision antisemitism's context in every era--be it economic, religious, social, or political." -- Rabbi Andrew Baker, Director of International Jewish Affairs, The American Jewish Committee

"A brilliant, lucid and compelling survey of a social, psychological, cultural, political and intellectual malady that has preoccupied and distorted European and Arab societies, Christian and Muslim civilizations, and both the political right and the political left. In this short volume, Laqueur provides an elegant, fast-paced and immensely readable account of a complex, confounding and still-mutating condition that continues to afflict our world. This book is a vital contribution to our understanding of an important and disturbing dimension of our past--and, as Laqueur so incisively shows, of our present and our future. There is no other book like it." -- Walter Reich, Yitzhak Rabin Memorial Professor of International Affairs, George Washington University
20 von 29 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
An excellent book 13. Juli 2006
Von Jill Malter - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
This thoughtful and rather comprehensive book got me to come up with my own definition of anti-Semitism:

Anti-Semitism is participation in a gratuitous war against the Jews.

I know that most folks may disagree with this definition. But I feel it removes some of the mysteriousness from this phenomenon, reducing it to a special case of war in general, an easier topic for many of us to relate to than, say, "hatred." I would call the mass murderers of Jews in World War Two "anti-Semites" whether they hated Jews or not. My definition also makes it easier to characterize acts (including slander) as anti-Semitic when they clearly contribute to such a war against the Jews (even if the perpetrators deny any intent to oppose all Jews). It means that wars against Israel's existence or against the existence of Judaism are anti-Semitic. It means that the wholehearted and gratuitous support that Mahatma Gandhi gave to the enemies of the Jews in the 1930s was anti-Semitic. And it means that mere constructive criticism of Jews, Jewish behavior, Judaism, Israel, the Hebrew language, or Zionist behavior is not anti-Semitic. There is surely a line between constructive criticism and acts of war.

My inclusion of the word "gratuitous" avoids issues of whether justified wars (or wars of self-defense) against the Jews are necessarily anti-Semitic. They aren't. A gratuitous war is by definition not truly one of self-defense. And the morality of such a war is (again by definition) very dubious at best.

The wars against the Jews for the past one (or two) thousand years appear to have been almost entirely gratuitous, so we need to ask ourselves about the persistence of such counterproductive fights. Now, what does Walter Laqueur tell us about this phenomenon?

Laqueur is one of "the last surviving members of a generation that lived through" European anti-Semitism "in its most extreme form." That is why, having lost his parents and family in this period, it is no surprise that he does not treat anti-Semitism as a laughing matter (as opposed to Canadian professor Michael Neumann, who Laqueur says has argued that where anti-Semitism exists, "it ought to be treated as a huge joke" or Mikis Theodorakis, who has said both that there really isn't any anti-Semitism and that the Jews are "the root of all evil"). Again, not surprisingly, Laqueur is "unlikely to overreact, crying `wolf' at the appearance of every mouse or mosquito."

There is plenty of good material in this book. We see how in the 1930s, Jews were told to move to Jerusalem; now they are told to move out of Jerusalem. We see so-called liberals saying that Jews would be tolerated only if they ceased to be Jews (notice that by my definition, that is pure anti-Semitism).

We learn about the remarkably vicious anti-Semitism of Saint John Chrysostom, Saint Augustine, and Martin Luther. Of the three, Augustine was the most moderate, but not by much, as Laqueur does mention that even Augustine explicitly wished that all the Jews be put to death by the sword. We see all sorts of preposterous conspiracy theories, such as an alliance of the Jews and Freemasons. We see anti-Semites declare that Jesus Christ could not have been Jewish (as a Pagan, I've also seen anti-Semites refuse to have anything to do with Christianity because Jesus was Jewish). We also learn about blood libels, the "Protocols," and the misuse of the Talmud to slander Judaism.

We learn a number of aspects in which the treatment of Jews during World War Two was qualitatively different (and worse) than even the simultaneous treatment of Gypsies, homosexuals, Slavs, Jehovah's Witnesses, or Communists.

We then get to anti-Semitism on the Left. That includes Holocaust denial (an automatic idea, given that if anti-Semitism can lead naturally to such consequences, most folks would not want to be part of an anti-Semitic movement). And we see some Arab Muslims argue simultaneously both that the Holocaust never took place and that it was justified. We see claims that the Jews are obviously trying to take over the world, even though if they are, it is strange that they are starting with a small region (the Levant) which has no natural resources (and which they could simply buy with no trouble were they permitted to bid for it at an open auction).

We see those on the so-called extreme left claim that all nations have a right to a state except for the Jews. To Laqueur's credit, he admits that it may be unreasonable to call such people (especially if they are pro-terrorist) members of the "left." I certainly think of such attitudes as a defining aspect of the anti-Semitic right wing. And that is all the more true for those who are against rights for women or homosexuals. As Laqueur says, this "New Left" closely resembles a medieval church.

Laqueur tells us about theories that Jewish "self-hatred" is an unusual and significant phenomenon. Laqueur doesn't buy it, and I agree with Laqueur here. He also strongly implies that if there were fifty million more Jews in Israel (with Israel correspondingly larger), the attacks on Israel would greatly diminish. That sounds quite plausible. On the other hand, he indicates that even though there is plenty of anti-Semitism in the absence of Jews (he cites Pakistan as one example), anti-Semitism would greatly diminish if there were no Jews. That may seem obvious, but my feeling is that since the attacks on Jews are gratuitous in the first place, the war would simply continue unabated against other victims.

As Laqueur relates, Sheik Qaradhawi says "that `there is no dialogue between us and the Jews except for the sword and rifle.'" I think that makes it clear that the failure here is on the part of the anti-Semites, and that whatever happens to the Jews, the anti-Semites will lose.

I disagree with much of Laqueur's politics, but I highly recommend this book.
5 von 7 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Asks some pertinent questions- avoids some of the bolder answers 19. Mai 2008
Von Gary Selikow - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
Walter Laqueur makes some extremely pertinent points in this book that need to be noted.

70 years ago the slogan in Europe had been "Jews go to Palestine". today it is "Jews Out of Palestine".
The author draws attention to the massive wars and genocides in which millions have perished in the last 25 years, as the result of civil wars, repression, social persecution and tribal conflicts, from Cambodia to much of Africa (Liberia, Congo, Rwanda, Darfur and Zimbabwe).
National and religious minority groups have been systematically abused, raped, murdered, burned, shot, gassed and their property demolished from North Korea and Tibet to Indonesia, Bangladesh, Central Asia and beyond.
But as Laqueur points out: "There have been no protest demonstrations concerning the fate of the Dalets ("Untouchables) in India, even though there are more than 100 million of them. The fate of the Uighur in China, the Copts in Egypt or the Bahai in Iran (to name but a few persecuted people) has not generated much indignation in the streets of Europe and America...According to peace researchers, 25 million were killed in internal conflicts since World War II, 8 000 of them in the Palestinian Israeli conflict, which ranks 46th in the list of victims. But Israel has been condemned at the United Nations and other international organizations more than all other nations put together."
Is this because Israel is small and isolated. There is definitely some type of extreme prejudice at work here.

One of the most intriguing ideas represented in this book is an exercise in counterfactual history: "What if the Ottoman Empire had collapsed one hundred years earlier than it did, and what if the majority of European Jews had decided to settle there. Given a birth rate similar to the Gaza strip, the region would now have a population of between 60 and 80 million inhabitants, perhaps more. And what if major oil fields had been discovered in this imaginary Greater Israel from the Nile to the Euphrates?" Such a country would be an honored member of the United Nations and accepted by the world. Nobody would question it's right to exist and it would be fully accepted by it's Arab and Moslem neighbors. The author presents an interesting historical analysis of anti-Semitism from ancient and mediaeval times, through the co-called "Enlightenment" to the present day.
He also analyses left wing anti-Semitism and illustrates how it is not always rooted in anti-Zionism or anti-Israel hatred. He also points out that anti-Israel hatred cannot really be accurately described as anti-Zionism. Israel is state based on many ideologies, Zionism only being one of them.
However the author does not go far enough in coming to the bolder conclusions to his pertinent questions.
The fact is that Israelis are Jews and being prejudiced against Israel or Israelis makes someone just as much a bigot as one who is prejudiced against Jews per se.
To hate a Jew for living in or being born in Israel is anti-Semitism in it's most extreme form, and to support attacks on Jews for living in Israel is murderous anti-Semitism, in my opinion no better than Nazism.
The Palestinians and their supporters want a Judenrein "Palestine", the same way Hitler wanted a Judenrein Europe.

The author certainly underestimates the the racist essence of Moslem anti-Semitism- he is simply wrong that conversion would dissipate the genocidal Arab and Iranian intentions.
Hamas has categorically stated that even if all Jews in "Palestine" converted to Islam, they would still have to leave or die, "As their blood is tainted with the criminal ideology of Zionism".
While for Diaspora Jews, a hatred of their own people and particularly of Israel, can gain them acceptance in Islamic and far-left circles. This is more difficult for the Jews of Israel.
Islamist and Leftwing radicals around the world (including "Respect" in the UK, The Workers World Party in the USA, and the International Solidarity Movement, even refer to Israeli children in terms of hatred as "Zionists", and claim their murder is justified.
Waren diese Rezensionen hilfreich? Wir wollen von Ihnen hören.