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The Bus Driver Who Wanted to Be God: And Other Stories (Englisch) Taschenbuch – 28. Januar 2005


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Produktinformation

  • Taschenbuch: 200 Seiten
  • Verlag: Toby Pr Llc (28. Januar 2005)
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ISBN-10: 1592641059
  • ISBN-13: 978-1592641055
  • Größe und/oder Gewicht: 21,6 x 16,3 x 1 cm
  • Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung: 5.0 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (3 Kundenrezensionen)
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: Nr. 87.316 in Fremdsprachige Bücher (Siehe Top 100 in Fremdsprachige Bücher)

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Produktbeschreibungen

Amazon.de

Etgar Keret's The Bus Driver Who Wanted to Be God & Other Stories stings and thrills with fierce fables of modern life. Set in landscapes ranging from "this armpit town outside Austin, Texas" to "this village in Uzbekistan that was built right smack at the mouth of Hell," these stories lay their plots' central tensions out plainly: "Dad wouldn't buy me a Bart Simpson doll," one begins. Then they take off like little roller coasters, careening through the pathos of Denis Johnson's Jesus' Son, the clowning of David Sedaris's Barrel Fever, the in-your-face violence of Quentin Tarantino, and the bewildered alienation of Franz Kafka. But readers need not know any of Keret's sources to enjoy his stories fully. The Israeli writer's aphorisms leap off the page and lodge themselves in the mind: "There are two kinds of people, those who like to sleep next to the wall, and those who like to sleep next to the people who push them off the bed." Keret's vernacular prose is fun to read, and his vision of the world is weirdly comforting. Happiness never really flourishes, but small hopes and graces abound. --Michael Joseph Gross -- Dieser Text bezieht sich auf eine vergriffene oder nicht verfügbare Ausgabe dieses Titels.

Pressestimmen

"These wry writings wring the truth out of the fabric of everyday life." (Boston Herald)

"One couldn't have hoped for a finer way to herald this major new voice in world literature." (San Francisco Chronicle)

"...hard to resist, with its distinctive mix of insight, humor, tenderness, indelicate language, and a hopeful kind of cynicism. . . . Exceptional." (Boston Globe)

"If you have a desire to indulge your taste for dark humor, you can't beat this book." (Baltimore Sun)

"Keret's stories are extremely short and witty, like comic sketches." (Wall Street Journal)

"Keret serves us plenty of good laughs." (New York Times Book Review)

"Twenty-two short, wonderfully surreal, laugh-out-loud-funny stories...all of them witty gems from a singular storyteller." (Elle)

"Keret serves us plenty of good laughs." (New York Times Book Review)

"The most successful stories capitalize on their brevity, their irony sharpening as the plot turns on a dime." (Publishers Weekly)

"Keret's prose comes straight out of the gate, a marvel of verbal economy that never loses its heart." (Flaunt Magazine)

"Witty, quirky and off-beat...In a society founded by ideology, Keret takes a satirical swipe at uncompromising idealogues..." (Chicago Jewish News)
-- Dieser Text bezieht sich auf eine vergriffene oder nicht verfügbare Ausgabe dieses Titels.

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Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen

Format: Taschenbuch
Once again these delicious words from Shakespeare are the very best way to describe yet another wonderful book. In every single short story the author manages to write fabulous tales with just enough words to make you laugh, dream and make you think about mankind, and not one more.
The very best might be the feeling you get after reading every story; then it suddenly becomes very clear that all persons are the same; those in Israel, USA and "this village in Uzbekistan that was built right smack at the mouth of Hell", are all the same.
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Von Birgit am 7. Februar 2014
Format: Taschenbuch Verifizierter Kauf
I read this book in the subway: The short stories are perfect literature for the short rides every day to work (made my day start with a laugh and at times with a crude feeling that not everything needs to be explained ...). And the last story? Not really U-Bahn literature: Couldn't wait for the next day ride to finish it.
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Format: Taschenbuch
The Bus Driver Who Wanted to Be God is an enjoyable collection to read. Etgar Keret emerged as witty, penetrating, humurous and very knowing. He is a fresh breath of to short story writing.Short stories by Chekhov, The Usurper and Other Stories, Runaway,Union Moujik are other fine and hilarious books to read.
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Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen auf Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 44 Rezensionen
40 von 43 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Great Short Fiction from Israel 8. September 2002
Von A. Ross - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
Although wildly popular in his native Israel, this collection is the first of Keret's work to be published in the US. Two-thirds of the small book is given over to 22 equally small short stories, all ranging from 5-8 pages or so. These stories are difficult to characterize, although they generally feature alienated males (often children or teenagers), and the writing is universally deft and satirically witty with an underlying tone of irony and sorrow-occasionally drifting into unreality. Any description of them would not do them justice at all. I don't read enough American writers to think up a good comparison, although I would say Kerst shares some of Jonathan Lethem and Mark Jude Porier's territory. However, what the stories more similar to is some of the short fiction that came out of Scotland in the early to mid-'90s from people like Gordon Legge, Duncan McLean, and James Kelman, who also write very brief stories. Perhaps most of all, the book bears comparison to the absurdist fables of another Scot, Magnus Mills (All Quiet on the Orient Express, The Restraint of Beasts, Three To See The King). The novella which occupies the final third of the book, "Kneller's Happy Campers", about the afterlife of those who commit suicide, is especially redolent of Mills' odd and affecting mix of black humor and fantasy. The collection is drawn and translated from Keret's bestselling collections in Israel, and one can only hope that more makes it into English and across the shores.
21 von 22 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
thoughtful and original. 19. September 2003
Von Linda C. Gerhardt - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Gebundene Ausgabe
Etgar Keret takes the term "short story" very literally. The majority of the stories don't exceed four pages. Keret doesn't engage in excessive prose, he doesn't devote much energy to setting a scene. He punches you on the nose with a story, then runs away. In the hands of any other author, this technique could be problematic: It doesn't allow the reader to truly know or care about his characters, and the only atmosphere present is the brevity of Keret's style. But it works because he is a very skilled storyteller, more concerned with walloping the reader over the head with a message and a purpose than taking the time to pull you into another world. Each story is a fable, a fairy tale. The short length and lack of detail can prove to be misleading--these are very complicated, well-thought out stories. They don't take long to read, but it does require time and brain-power to comprehend them.
A few stories fall flat. "Uterus," for instance. Sometimes I got the impression that something was lost in translation. But "The Bus Driver Who Wanted To Be God: & Other Stories" is a very satisfying collection, meaty in ideas if not physical heft.
5 von 5 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Brilliant 6. Februar 2008
Von M. Reyero - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch
I read this book in its Spanish translation before reading the English one -- they each read a bit differently but Keret's literary brilliance comes through in either: a forceful plunge into humanity's flaws.
2 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Ironic, twisted, and entertaining, but darker than his other book..... 3. September 2010
Von Fair Reviewer - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch
The short stories are typical Keret, with distilled power and irony. I thought the book was good, but it was a bit darker than his Nimrod Flipout, which had a few more hopeful stories (which I really enjoyed).
1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Best Book I've Read this year 10. Oktober 2010
Von Guillermo Corona - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch Verifizierter Kauf
I might be going a little too far by calling this the best book I've read all year, but while the high of this book still lingers with me that's what I'm calling it. I'll admit the only reason I bought this book was to read "Kneller's Happy Campers" because it was adapted into the film Wristcutters - A Love Story, but "Knellers" turned out to be the last story in the collection and it just didn't feel right to ignore the other stories.

Etgar Keret doesn't disappoint. His style might be a little over the top for the average reader, but his imagination is just the sort of world I'd love to live in. From a town that houses the gateway to hell to a man who finds Heaven within a pipe, the book is filled with slice-of-life stories of average-joe characters who just happen to reside within the surreal.

I should warn that if you're not into magical realism, bizarro fiction, or surrealism, then you should stray away from this collection. However, if you're seeking an exit from the monotony of your choice genre, this book might just be what you're looking for.
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