In weniger als einer Minute können Sie mit dem Lesen von The Body Economic: Why Austerity Kills auf Ihrem Kindle beginnen. Sie haben noch keinen Kindle? Hier kaufen Oder fangen Sie mit einer unserer gratis Kindle Lese-Apps sofort an zu lesen.

An Ihren Kindle oder ein anderes Gerät senden

 
 
 

Kostenlos testen

Jetzt kostenlos reinlesen

An Ihren Kindle oder ein anderes Gerät senden

Jeder kann Kindle Bücher lesen  selbst ohne ein Kindle-Gerät  mit der KOSTENFREIEN Kindle App für Smartphones, Tablets und Computer.
Der Artikel ist in folgender Variante leider nicht verfügbar
Keine Abbildung vorhanden für
Farbe:
Keine Abbildung vorhanden

 

The Body Economic: Why Austerity Kills [Kindle Edition]

David Stuckler , Sanjay Basu
4.7 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (3 Kundenrezensionen)

Kindle-Preis: EUR 15,16 Inkl. MwSt. und kostenloser drahtloser Lieferung über Amazon Whispernet

Weitere Ausgaben

Amazon-Preis Neu ab Gebraucht ab
Kindle Edition EUR 15,16  
Gebundene Ausgabe EUR 20,44  
Hörbuch-Download, Ungekürzte Ausgabe EUR 15,70 oder EUR 0,00 im Probeabo von Audible.de


Produktbeschreibungen

Pressestimmen

A powerful and important contribution to our future. Stuckler and Basu use statistics not to dehumanize people, but to bring them to life (Ha-Joon Chang, author of '23 Things They Don't Tell You About Capitalism')

Explosive ... powerful. Backed by a decade of research, and based on reams of publicly available data... The Body Economic should come as a broadside, morally armour-plated and data-reinforced (Jon Henley Guardian)

A powerful indictment of the unnecessary suffering and rising mortality rates associated with austerity policies unsoftened by remedial social programmes. I hope the finance ministers read it, and try mixing with the ordinary people, who are the only ones who can bring about economic recovery (Harry Eyres Financial Times)

A surprisingly readable book with a compassionate tone. The inclusion of stories about ordinary individuals affected by austerity lends it a poignancy not typically found in economics literature (Iain Morris Observer)

Economist David Stuckler and epidemiologist Sanjay Basu have spent years correlating government policy and health statistics ... the data is as convincing as the stories are harrowing ... every country that has followed an economic crash with austerity has had a public health catastrophe (Richard Godwin Evening Standard)

Far too many books are described as seminal, but The Body Economic really could be ... Stuckler and Basu are in the vanguard of a movement to recast economics as a matter of life and death ... We should organise a massive love-bombing of Treasury and IMF officials with copies of The Body Economic (Amol Rajan Evening Standard)

The Body Economic is a bold synthesis of quantitative data, historical cases, personal narratives, and sociological and clinically informed analyses about the effects of investing, or failing to invest, in public health safety nets. In investigating the causes of adverse health outcomes in populations from the United States to the Soviet Union to Greece, Iceland, and the UK, David Stuckler and Sanjay Basu expose many of the myths and mystifications that prop up the regnant ideologies of fiscal austerity. Stuckler and Basu revive the great, progressive tradition of social medicine. Their work is important not just for all those who deliver health care services, but also for anyone who might, just might, one day be a patient (Paul Farmer, M.D., Kolokotrones University Professor, Harvard Medical School, and Founding Director, Partners in Health)

Kurzbeschreibung

The Body Economic is the first, agenda-shaping, look at the human costs of financial crisis - the culmination of ten years' work by two pioneering researchers - Sanjay Basu and David Stuckler



The global financial crisis has had a seismic impact upon the wealth of nations. But we have little sense of how it affects one of the most fundamental issues of all: our physical and mental health.



This highly significant new book, based on the authors' own groundbreaking research, looks at the daily lives of people affected by financial crisis, from the Great Depression of the 1930s, to post-communist Russia, to the US foreclosure crisis of the late 2000s. Why, it asks, did Sweden experience a fall in suicides during its banking crisis? What triggered a mosquito-borne epidemic in California in 2007? What caused 10 million Russian men to 'disappear' in the 1990s? Why is Greece experiencing rocketing HIV rates? And how did the health of Americans actually improve during the catastrophic crisis of the 1930s? The conclusions it draws are both surprising and compelling: remarkably, when faced with similar crises, the health of some societies - like Iceland - improves, while that of others, such as Greece, deteriorates. Even amid the worst economic disasters, negative public health effects are not inevitable: it's how communities respond to challenges of debt and market turmoil that counts.



The Body Economic puts forward a radical proposition. Austerity, it argues, is seriously bad for your health. We can prevent financial crises from becoming epidemics, but to do so, we must acknowledge what the hard data tells us: that, throughout history, there is a causal link between the strength of a community's health and its social protection systems. Now and for generations to come, our commitment to the building of fairer, more equal societies will determine the health of our body economic.



'A powerful and important contribution to our future. Stuckler and Basu use statistics not to dehumanize people, but to bring them to life' Ha-Joon Chang, author of 23 Things They Don't Tell You About Capitalism



'Explosive ... powerful. Backed by a decade of research, and based on reams of publicly available data... The Body Economic should come as a broadside, morally armour-plated and data-reinforced', Jon Henley, Guardian



'Economist David Stuckler and epidemiologist Sanjay Basu have spent years correlating government policy and health statistics ... the data is as convincing as the stories are harrowing ... every country that has followed an economic crash with austerity has had a public health catastrophe' Richard Godwin, Evening Standard



'Far too many books are described as seminal, but The Body Economic really could be ... Stuckler and Basu are in the vanguard of a movement to recast economics as a matter of life and death ... We should organise a massive love-bombing of Treasury and IMF officials with copies of The Body Economic' Amol Rajan, Evening Standard



'The Body Economic is a bold synthesis of quantitative data, historical cases, personal narratives, and sociological and clinically informed analyses about the effects of investing, or failing to invest, in public health safety nets. In investigating the causes of adverse health outcomes in populations from the United States to the Soviet Union to Greece, Iceland, and the UK, David Stuckler and Sanjay Basu expose many of the myths and mystifications that prop up the regnant ideologies of fiscal austerity. Stuckler and Basu revive the great, progressive tradition of social medicine. Their work is important not just for all those who deliver health care services, but also for anyone who might, just might, one day be a patient' Paul Farmer, M.D., Kolokotrones University Professor, Harvard Medical School, and Founding Director, Partners in Health



David Stuckler is a Senior Research Leader at Oxford University; after completing his Master's in Public Health at Yale University and PhD at Cambridge University, he became a professor in political economy at Harvard University; he also currently holds research posts at London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine and Chatham House. He has published over one-hundred peer-reviewed scientific articles in major journals on the subjects of economics and global health, and his work has featured on the cover of The New York Times and The Economist, as well as on BBC, NPR, and CNN, among others. Sanjay Basu is an Assistant Professor of Medicine and an epidemiologist at Stanford University. He has worked with Oxfam International and is a member of the New York Academy of Sciences. His work has featured in The New York Times and Wall Street Journal and he has written over 80 peer-reviewed articles.


Produktinformation


Mehr über die Autoren

Entdecken Sie Bücher, lesen Sie über Autoren und mehr

Kundenrezensionen

3 Sterne
0
2 Sterne
0
1 Sterne
0
4.7 von 5 Sternen
4.7 von 5 Sternen
Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen
1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen The Body economic 1. Juli 2013
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe|Verifizierter Kauf
Dieses Buch ist ganz klar geschrieben und sehr gut dokumentiert. Es wirft ein Licht über Geschehenisse, die die Presse nicht berichtet, d.h. die Konsequezen auf Menschenleben und -gesundheit der Austerität. Gibt es alternative Wege? Das Buch versucht, einen Antwort zu geben.
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?
1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Dieses Buch sucht seinesgleichen 25. Juni 2013
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe|Verifizierter Kauf
Basierend auf wissenschaftlicher Forschung präsentieren die Autoren Erkenntinisse, die sich gerade deutsche Regierungspolitiker zu Herzen nehmen sollten. Politik wird außerhalb des Links-Rechts-Schemas evidenzbasiert!
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?
1 von 1 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Klar und deutlich 3. Juni 2013
Von E.D.
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe
Ein sehr gut geschriebenes Werk, welches mit Abischt an manchen Stellen etwas vereinfacht ist, damit die Argumente auch fuer Buerger gut Verstaendlich bleiben, die sich weniger mit dem Thema "austerity" auseinandergesetzt haben. Wer denkt, dass das Buch vielleicht zu sehr vereinfacht ist, oder wer sich noch weiter mit dem Thema auseinadersetzen moechte, sollte lieber die wissenschaftlichen Artikel von Stuckler and Basu lesen.

Das Buch is auch gut konzipiert und struktueriert und erhaelt trozt der wirtschaftlichen Themen eine gewisse Spanung. Sehr empfelenswert!
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?
Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen auf Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.7 von 5 Sternen  27 Rezensionen
32 von 34 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Conservatives, beware! This book might actually change your mind. 9. Mai 2013
Von Viz - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe|Verifizierter Kauf
The Body Economic is a refreshing change in the monotonous age of blogs that have no accountability,articles that haven't been reviewed by critical peers, and books that are backed up with nothing but ideology (and a willing publisher).

The book starts by saying that we are all part of a clinical trial. This sounds cute at first but becomes more chilling as you read along. The book looks at populations around the world (Iceland, Greece, historical and contemporary United States, the UK, Sweden, Thailand, post-Soviet Nations etc) and how they fared based on which decisions their governments made (cut spending or maintain social programs). The results are unequivocal and will threaten the ideologues on the right but can actually change their minds, if they give data a chance.

This book has the passion of "Pathologies of Power", but takes a more direct look at the economic determinants of health. It has the empathy and global reach of "Development as Freedom" but has a remarkably accessible language, especially given that the authors are academicians (sorry Amartya Sen, you are a brilliant economist but you work faster than Ambien for the average Jane). It has the data-driven approach of "Poor Economics" but it is unapologetic in its conclusion that austerity kills.

The last point is sure to ruffle some feathers. Academics who make conclusions that are backed by politically-neutral data often take a cautious approach in their language, perhaps in an attempt to engage those who might be turned off by a subtitle as seemingly polarizing as "Why Austerity Kills". However, The Body Economic is unapologetic and strongly backed by solid data. Kudos to the authors for using something like 60 pages for notes and references so that you can look at the primary sources if you wanted to (also made for a faster read!) And these aren't your bogus speeches/opinions/whatnot that are referenced as some scholarly work (I am looking at you, NYT best-selling author Glenn Beck). The papers that this book is based on are published in some of the most prestigious journals in the world (The Lancet, BMJ etc), meaning they have undergone a very critical review process that peruses data and rips apart conclusions that have no empirical backing. I didn't recognize all the journals (that doesn't mean much) but it is hard to ignore a book that is based on data and statistical methods that were closely scrutinized. Like I said, a refreshing change in the wordpress era where everyone is an expert on anything.

I did start the book by being slightly turned off by the unapologetic tone that bashes austerity from page one (or actually, the cover). However after reading the book, I can see why the authors chose to place the central focus on the logical conclusion that cutting down critical services in the name of "tightening the belt" makes people sick and kills them, at a rate much higher than what happened in other places where the belt wasn't tightened, despite the overwhelming forces trying to make them cut back.

My other gripe about the book is its focus -as is apparent in its subtitle- on just deaths. This risks giving the impression that they have ignored the other very important measure of illness: disability. Upon closer reading, there is a lot dedicated to the effect of economic policies not just on mortality but also on disability (perhaps "Why Austerity Kills... and causes Disability" is not as catchy?) It is also possible that mortality data were easier to access and compare across countries vs. data on disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) from physical and neuropsychiatric conditions.

Overall, a good read that is pertinent to the heated discussions on government spending. It shows a clear way forward by presenting cases from around the world. Liberals will have an easier time relating to and agreeing with the book. So will fiscal conservatives, as long as they are willing to get past the rhetoric and look at the hard data that the authors have compiled.
14 von 14 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Austerity, economic growth, and death: The Body Economic by Stuckler and Basu 18. Mai 2013
Von Duncan Maru - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe
Saving money in times of scarcity is a theme passed along to most of us from our parents and grandparents. Many of us deeply value and respect individual frugality, even if it is not easily or effectively put into practice. Indeed, spending and saving wisely is a key foundation for individual and community prosperity. Somewhere along the way, however, large number of influential economists and politicians intuitively and understandably tried to apply this logic to governments at times of financial crisis. Thus was born the idea of "austerity", a fiscal principal of cutting back spending in order to avoid debt and deficits. The results over the last quarter century of global austerity policies were devastating on both economic growth and population health. The austerity policy "experiment", as epidemiologists David Stuckler and Sanjay Basu describe in their new book, The Body Economic, has led to large losses to both the economy and to population health.

As an epidemiologist and a physician myself, I see on a daily basis the real and deep morality to statistics and their accurate collection, interpretation, and discussion. Real people live and die on the basis of how we as citizens, policy makers, and clinical providers process data. Indeed, all of us, regardless of our professions, are confronted with statistics about life and death on a daily basis. What we or our policy makers rarely do, however, is analyze deeply these statistics and how they actually impact our lives. This is the heart of the approach that Drs. Stuckler and Basu take to analyzing economic policies at times of recessions: what do data tell us, beyond rhetoric and intuition and biases, about how governments should respond? Interestingly, the answer to recessions is to focus less on deficits and make key infrastructure, public health, and employment investments.

Drs. Stuckler and Basu take a rigorous, insightful, and approachable look at the mountains of data that have accumulated as a result of the large-scale austerity experiment. Building off a growing academic literature, they build a strong case for the subtitle of their book: that austerity both suppresses economic growth and decimates population health, that governments' must maintain a rate of growth below the rate of revenue growth. This may sound like a political statement, making a political argument about a type of fiscal policy. Indeed, their work has important policy implications. However, the work at its heart is a profoundly moral one: how do we learn from evidence about life-saving or life-shortening economic policies? Can we pursue policies that break our false dichotomies that government spending is not consistent with economic growth, or that public health investments, while they may have health benefits, might harm the economy? Their data show clearly that these dichotomies are political creations, not descriptions of economic truths.

One of the most notable of the austerity experiments occurred in former Soviet Union states after the fall of communism. While austerity was very much en vogue among economic advisors to post-communist states, there was wide variation in the degree to which countries pursued austerity. Across twenty-five post-communist countries between 1989 and 2002, those countries that implemented rapid mass privatization suffered increased male job losses by 56% compared with those that pursued a gradualist path (for example, Belarus, who kept poverty rates below 2% during the transition). Furthermore, countries like Kazakhstan, Latvia, and Lithuania that engaged in rapid austerity measures experienced significant drops in life expectancy over the course of five years, while gradualist neighboring countries fared much better in terms of public health outcomes. One of the more striking findings was that there 10 million excess deaths among Russian men attributed to austerity measures in the immediate post-Soviet era; much of that was related to joblessness. Drs. Basu and Stuckler make compelling arguments with data that the economic and health disasters after the fall of communism were not inevitable.

Similar findings are seen with the most recent economic recession. In discussing these cases, The Body Economic provides rich evidence that health, education and social protection programs have among the highest fiscal multipliers, or money received back in economic growth for each dollar invested. Austerity measures that cut such programs therefore have profound economic effects. The resulting health effects--both because of the lack of health programs and because of worsening economies--is felt in the loss of life. There were 35,000 avoidable deaths in the United States during the recent Great Recession due to a lack of healthcare insurance, with 6 million Americans joining the 40 million already without coverage during this time. During the Greek financial crisis in which austerity measures were pursued, there was a 40% rise in infant mortality and 47% rise in unmet healthcare needs between 2008 and 2011.

Their lessons are important for individuals across the political spectrum. They put forth evidence that economic growth and investing in a robust social safety net can be mutually reinforcing rather than, as many pundits would suggest, mutually exclusive. At a time of decreasing confidence in government around the world, their data speaks to the relevance of governments in protecting decency, health, dignity, and economic prosperity. The data implore citizens to hold their governments accountable to a robust social safety net and pro-growth strategies (including utilizing fiscal multipliers to evaluate impact and growth) during recessions while demanding of governments to be more effective in how they deliver on these policies. After all, these are not academic matters but rather questions of life and death, prosperity and poverty.

Duncan Maru, MD, PhD, is a physician, epidemiologist, and co-founder of Nyaya Health. He works as a resident physician in Internal Medicine and Pediatrics at Harvard where he is a fellow in the Global Health Equity Program.
11 von 11 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Important Book in Public Health Economics 21. Mai 2013
Von Hans G. Despain - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition
This book is a very powerful condemnation of austerity measures in economic policy. The book is based on more than a decade worth of peer-reviewed academic work concerning economic policy and its effect on public health outcomes. The authors have given special care to write an accessible book aimed at a non-specialist audience. They have succeeded brilliantly.

Austerity is simply the idea of cutting budgets to payoff national debt. Mark Blyth has recently published a book Austerity: The History of a Dangerous Idea that demonstrates that the economic policy of austerity is a failure. Stuckler and Basu demonstrate that such measures have very negative effects on public health and quite literally kill.

The Body Economic signifies the economic and financial systems of which we are all a part, the economic policies that constitute these systems, and most important to the argument of the book, the health effects of these systems and policies.

Stuckler and Basu argue that economic forces have a direct influence on who is more likely to spiral into depression, be infected by disease, catch tuberculosis in a homeless shelter, binge on alcohol, turn to illicit drug use, etc..

Most surprisingly Suckler and Basu find that it is not economic downturns that increase ill-health, rather it is the policy that is either enacted or not enacted that determines the health outcomes of an economic downturn.

In concrete with Mark Blyth's book, Stuckler and Basu conclude that austerity does not decrease deficits, but in fact increases deficits. Instead they maintain that stimulus spending on public health, job market programs, and housing actually helps reduce the deficits.

They use a number of historical episodes as natural scientific laboratories to determine the effects of economic policy on health outcomes. They first compare the policy of the UK versus US following the Great Recession of 2007. Whereas, UK implemented stronger austerity measures, the US implemented economic policy that stabilized household income. Public health in UK got worse than it did in the US.

They next present data of 114 cities in thirty-six states over the decade from 1927 to 1937. "New Deal programs not only helped avert further economic disaster but also were statistically correlated to large and lasting public health improvements." These outcomes radically depended on whether states strongly or weakly implemented New Deal policy. When states resisted New Deal policy health outcomes worsened, when New Deal policy was implemented health outcomes improved.

New Deal policy reduced suicide rates, improved children survival rates, and decreased infectious diseases with New Deal job programs and housing programs. "Overall, the size of the New Deal relief programs constituted less than 20 percent of the gross domestic product. And they not only reduced deaths but also sped up economic recovery. The New Deal brought an immediate 9 percent rise in average American income, increasing people's spending and helping to create new jobs. Rather than creating a vicious negative spiral of increasing debt and deficits, as its critics had predicted, the stimulus helped the US economy grow out of debt."

Chapter 2 shows similar results in "post-communist" countries during the 1990s. Those countries that implemented austerity had worse health outcomes and more debt, those countries resisting austerity and implementing stabilization and stimulus policy had better health outcomes and less debt.

Chapter 3 investigates the historical example of East Asia during the 1990s crises. The outcomes again show worse health outcomes and more debt with austerity, better health outcomes and less debt with stabilization and stimulus policy.

Chapters 4 and 5 outline the recent episodes of Iceland and Greece.

Iceland maintained social production programs to help people obtain food, jobs, and housing. They further offered debt relief policy to businesses and households, and allowed banks "too-big-to-fail" to fail. Greece followed the opposite path, with policy of austerity. You know the results, in Greece health outcomes worsened and debt deepened, in Iceland health outcomes improved and debt shrunk.

In chapter 6 health-care systems are compared. Chapter 7 discusses "Active Labor Market Programs", i.e. employment policies, and chapter 8 housing policies. The long and short of these pages is that access to health-care, employment and housing is not only important for health outcomes of a nation, but also determines the economic health and stability of society.

Austerity hurts economies, has Mark Blyth puts it, "Austerity doesn't work. Period." But after reading Stuckler and Basu, the greatest tragedy of austerity is not that it hurts the economy, it is the "unnecessary human suffering" in mental and physical health of individuals enduring a failed policy measure.

As Stuckler and Basu remind us, "Austerity is a choice. And we don't have to choose it." As Nobel Prize economist Joseph Stiglitz put it to various national policy makers, if the IMF recommends austerity, kick them out. Austerity not only does not work. Period. It Kills. Exclamation!
6 von 6 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Facts, peer-reviewed, iron-clad: austerity is hazardous to your health 25. Mai 2013
Von Gregg Gonsalves - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe|Verifizierter Kauf
So, conservatives will hate this book. They will blather on about spending beyond our means, governments being broke, all derived from the common fallacy that national budgets are like those of families, when the truth is that governments can and often run in the red unlike you and me. Rank and file conservatives largely don't understand economics and the excesses of conservative economists like Ken Rogoff and Carmen Reinhart's anti-Keynesianism have been roundly debunked. No one is defending unnecessary, profligate spending or ignoring deficits in the long term, but austerity in the short-term during economic slumps doesn't promote growth--look at the UK and the Eurozone for your textbook case.
But even if you still want to hold onto austerity as a policy preference, you'll have to deal with Basu and Stuckler's book. The science here has been peer reviewed. Unless you're also hanging onto conspiracy theories about the Lancet and the British Medical Journal being under the control of some modern version of the Freemasons or the Illuminati, in hanging onto austerity as a creed, you'll have to take on the consequences of your policy preferences as well. Basu and Stuckler go through the data step by step and show that infectious disease deaths and deaths due to mental illness and substance use spike under austerity; it's not bad economic times that are bad for your health, it's how your government responds to recessions and depressions. If safety net programs are cut, the facts show that people die in greater numbers than in places where key social programs remain intact or are enhanced during crises.
If you want to argue with the data, go to the original papers and critique the methodology used to derive the conclusions made in the book. You don't get to make ad hominem arguments or change the subject to something more to your liking.
Basu and Stuckler's book will end up as a classic. They've made a direct connection between the reigning economic ideology of the early 21st century and excess mortality and morbidity and have indeed shown that austerity kills. The saddest thing is that European and American politicians will likely ignore their findings and turn a blind eye to the suffering of millions. All in a day's work for the bureaucrats of Washington DC, Brussels and Berlin I suppose.
What we can hope is that future leaders will learn from our mistakes in 2013. Ordinary Greeks, Spaniards, Italians, Americans are paying with their lives for what our governments have done in our names in this most inauspicious of beginnings to a new century.
Gregg Gonsalves
Yale University
New Haven, CT
4 von 4 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen helping the data speak 28. Mai 2013
Von JRA - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition
Stuckler and Basu are preeminent epidemiologists who have conducted some of the most important analyses of the affects of recession-era economic policies on health outcomes, with papers regularly appearing in prestigious peer-reviewed medical journals such as The Lancet, PLoS Medicine, and British Medical Journal. I have glanced through many of their papers, and decided to read this book to get a better sense of the broader historical and political context of these studies. Nevertheless, I went into the book still somewhat expecting them to build chapters around their major papers (as many books do) which often leads to a contrived or disruptive narrative, as the authors try to force a thread through disparate works. This was fortunately not the case here. Instead, the book is divided into three sections, the first of which looks at historical economic events (The Great Depression, the transition of former Soviet states, the East Asian economic crisis), the second examining the recent great recession (focusing on contrasting experiences of Iceland and Greece), and the third looking at the contemporary austerity debates and experiences (with focus largely on the US and UK, though bringing in evidence from Sweden, Spain, Italy, etc.)

The writing is clear and engaging. The authors provide a concise, yet informative review of the economic debates that surrounded the response to the Great Depression, "Shock Therapy" for the Former Soviet States, Iceland's economic collapse, Malaysia's defiance of the IMF and therefore of the health consequences of the East Asian economic crisis, the political events and health effects surrounding Greece's recent bailout and austerity push, etc. They've done a great job of balancing historical/political contextual information with explaining what they found in the data and building an argument for how this should inform future policies. What's left out to keep the text tight and readable is well referenced in endnotes.

One of the most compelling points in the book surrounds the discussion of the "fiscal multiplier", which as the authors define is "an estimate of how many dollars of future economic growth are created for each dollar of government spending". Austerity is based on the principle that this number is less than 1, such that government spending is hurting economic growth potential (and by extension, cutting spending would allow diversion of this funding towards activities that create more growth). Stuckler and Basu note that the IMF assumed in many cases that this number was 0.5, such that austerity makes economic sense, whereas data later suggested that it was well over 1 in many scenarios, particularly for health spending where it was as high as 3.0. In other words, cutting spending on healthcare wasn't just bad for health, it hurt GDP growth potential. This is a critical concept, and my one criticism of the book is that there wasn't more discussion of where the IMF drew this number from and why they continued to use this value after it has been refuted in multiple examples (as the authors illustrate).

That said, the fiscal multiplier is really about the anticipated economic consequences of austerity, whereas Stuckler and Basu's main thesis is that these debates about austerity have universally failed to keep public health concerns at the forefront, and those health consequences are considerable. The key myth that is likely keeping public health concerns sidelined in the discourse about austerity is that health outcomes always decline in a recession, so the focus of fiscal policies needs to be solely on economic growth to address that. The authors demonstrate with great clarity that health outcomes in many cases improve during recessions or depressions (mortality fell during the Great Depression and rose during recovery!); the important variable is how governments manage their health and social safety nets during periods of recession and unemployment. Austerity hasn't been shown to make good long-term economic sense (with a trend towards harm), whereas it invariably has short term public health harms.

Their fundamental argument then is a simple but urgent one for countries facing difficult fiscal decisions in the face of recession: that the predictable health consequences of spending cuts be weighed in the calculus of austerity, because the lives lost during recession won't return with the GDP.
Waren diese Rezensionen hilfreich?   Wir wollen von Ihnen hören.
Kundenrezensionen suchen
Nur in den Rezensionen zu diesem Produkt suchen

Kunden diskutieren

Das Forum zu diesem Produkt
Diskussion Antworten Jüngster Beitrag
Noch keine Diskussionen

Fragen stellen, Meinungen austauschen, Einblicke gewinnen
Neue Diskussion starten
Thema:
Erster Beitrag:
Eingabe des Log-ins
 

Kundendiskussionen durchsuchen
Alle Amazon-Diskussionen durchsuchen
   


Ähnliche Artikel finden