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The Body Artist: A Novel [Englisch] [Gebundene Ausgabe]

Don DeLillo
2.7 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (3 Kundenrezensionen)

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Kurzbeschreibung

6. Februar 2001
For thirty years, since the publication of his first novel "Americana," Don DeLillo has lived in the skin of our times. He has found a voice for the forgotten souls who haunt the fringes of our culture and for its larger-than-life, real-life figures. His language is defiantly, radiantly American. Now, to a new century, he has brought "The Body Artist." In this spare, seductive novel, he inhabits the muted world of Lauren Hartke, an artist whose work defies the limits of the body. Lauren is living on a lonely coast, in a rambling rented house, where she encounters a strange, ageless man, a man with uncanny knowledge of her own life. Together they begin a journey into the wilderness of time -- time, love and human perception. As the "Seattle Times" said of DeLillo's last novel, "Masterpieces teach you how to read them." "The Body Artist" is a haunting, beautiful and profoundly moving novel from one of the finest writers of our time.

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Produktinformation

  • Gebundene Ausgabe: 128 Seiten
  • Verlag: Scribner (6. Februar 2001)
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ISBN-10: 074320395X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0743203951
  • Größe und/oder Gewicht: 22,3 x 14,5 x 1,8 cm
  • Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung: 2.7 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (3 Kundenrezensionen)
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: Nr. 452.037 in Englische Bücher (Siehe Top 100 in Englische Bücher)

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Produktbeschreibungen

Amazon.de

Don DeLillo's reputation rests on a series of large-canvas novels, in which he's proven to be the foremost diagnostician of our national psyche. In The Body Artist, however, he sacrifices breadth for depth, narrowing his focus to a single life, a single death. The protagonist is Lauren Hartke, who we see sharing breakfast with her husband, Rey, in the opening pages. This 18-page sequence is a tour de force (albeit a less showy one than the author's initial salvo in Underworld)--an intricate, funny notation of Lauren's consciousness as she pours cereal, peers out the window, and makes idle chat. Rey, alas, will proceed directly from the breakfast table to the home of his former wife, where he'll unceremoniously blow his brains out.

What follows is one of the strangest ghost stories since The Turn of the Screw. And like James's tale, it seems to partake of at least seven kinds of ambiguity, leaving the reader to sort out its riddles. Returning to their summer rental after Rey's funeral, Lauren discovers a strange stowaway living in a spare room: an inarticulate young man, perhaps retarded, who may have been there for weeks. His very presence is hard for her to pin down: "There was something elusive in his aspect, moment to moment, a thinning of physical address." Yet soon this mysterious figure begins to speak in Rey's voice, and her own, playing back entire conversations from the days preceding the suicide. Has Lauren's husband been reincarnated? Or is the man simply an eavesdropping idiot savant, reproducing sentences he'd heard earlier from his concealment?

DeLillo refuses any definitive answer. Instead he lets Lauren steep in her grief and growing puzzlement, and speculates in his own voice about this apparent intersection of past and present, life and death. At times his rhetoric gets away from him, an odd thing for such a superbly controlled writer. "How could such a surplus of vulnerability find itself alone in the world?" he asks, sounding as though he's discussing a sick puppy. And Lauren's performances--for she is the body artist of the title--sound pretty awful, the kind of thing Artaud might have cooked up for an aerobics class. Still, when DeLillo reins in the abstractions and bears down, the results are heartbreaking:

Why shouldn't the death of a person you love bring you into lurid ruin? You don't know how to love the ones you love until they disappear abruptly. Then you understand how thinly distanced from their suffering, how sparing of self you often were, only rarely unguarded of heart, working your networks of give-and-take.
At this stage of his career, a thin book is an adventure for DeLillo. So is his willingness to risk sentimentality, to immerse us in personal rather than national traumas. For all its flaws, then, The Body Artist is a real, raw accomplishment, and a reminder that bigger, even for so capacious an imagination as DeLillo's, isn't always better. --James Marcus

Pressestimmen

Adam BegleyThe New York Times Book ReviewA metaphysical ghost story about a woman alone....Intimate, spare, exquisite. -- Dieser Text bezieht sich auf eine vergriffene oder nicht verfügbare Ausgabe dieses Titels.

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Kundenrezensionen

2.7 von 5 Sternen
2.7 von 5 Sternen
Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen
2.0 von 5 Sternen Enttäuschend 11. September 2007
Von Michael Dienstbier TOP 500 REZENSENT
Format:Taschenbuch
Don DeLillos 2001 veröffentlichte Novelle "The Body Artist" hat mich irgendwie auf dem falschen Fuß erwischt. Normalerweise seziert der amerikanische Autor in seinen Romanen wie "Americana", "White Noise", "Libra" oder "Falling Man" die Seele, das Wesen und die Kultur der USA. Auch die beiden amerikanischen Traumata, die Ermordung Kennedys ("Libra") sowie 9/11 ("Falling Man") standen bereits im Zentrum seiner Romane. "The Body Artist" jedoch ist ein Art Geistergeschichte über eine Frau, die mit dem Verlust eines geliebten Menschen fertig werden muss.

Diese Frau ist die Performancekünstlerin Laureen Hartke, deren Mann Rey Robles sich erschossen hat. Kurz nach Reys Tod taucht in ihrem Haus ein offensichtlich geistig zurückgebliebender junger Mann auf. Richtig unheimlich wird es, als dieser Mann mit Reys Stimme zu sprechen beginnt. Somit steht eine Frage im Zentrum der Handlung: Ist der junge Mann nur eine Einbildung Laureens, eine Art Strategie, um den Verlust ihres Manne zu überwinden, oder gibt es ihn tatsächlich? Mehr soll an dieser Stelle nicht verraten werden.

Die ganz interessante Ausgangsidee wird wenig überzeugend umgesetzt. Vielleicht wollte DeLillo exakt 30 Jahren nach seinem ersten Roman mal etwas neues ausprobieren. In seinen beiden folgenden Roman "Cosmopolis" sowie "Falling Man" hat er sich dann aber wieder auf das konzentriert, was ihn zu einem besten Autoren der Postmoderne hat werden lassen.
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1 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen ..Beautiful. 13. März 2002
Von Tim D.
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe
..just pure beautiful language. precise - and imaginative - sharp as a movie set up in a house at the sea. very slow, but deep and evolving. read the beautifully designed hard-cover version in English! I don't buy too many books but I got a second copy of this as a birthday present for my girlfriend..
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0 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
1.0 von 5 Sternen unverständlich 21. August 2007
Von vielleser
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe
Der hochgerühmte De Lillo bleibt mir ein Rätsel - die Novelle The Body Artist ist unverständlich, in fragmentarischen Sätzen verfasst und handlungsarm. In einigen wenigen Sätzen scheinen Ironie und poetischer Witz durch.
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Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen auf Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 3.4 von 5 Sternen  127 Rezensionen
19 von 20 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen How much ambiguity can you accept? 14. September 2002
Von Mary Whipple - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch
The Body Artist is one of the strangest--and most seductive--books I've read in a long time, a "ghost story" with a character who is described as if he were real, and whom the main character believes to be real, and who may, in fact, be real--but who may also be a figment of imagination. Events which are described as real may be fantasies, and even the relationships the main character has or has had with people who seem to be real may, in fact, be colored by wishful thinking. Ultimately, even the linear progression of the narrative itself is called into question since, DeLillo tells us, "Past, present, and future are not amenities of language."

The story begins with the intimately described minutiae of breakfast, as a couple, married just a short time, gets ready for the day. We learn that it takes two cycles on the toaster to get the bread the right color, that the cup is his and the paper is hers, that a blue jay comes to the bird feeder, that she puts soya on her cereal and that it smells like feet. When Rey Robles, the husband, dies later that day (something we know from the beginning), the world of the wife, Lauren Hartke, changes from one of communication and an outward focus to a world of grief and an inward focus. When she discovers a stranger living on the third floor of her rented house, we aren't sure whether he is real or whether he materializes to show Lauren's unresolved feelings about her loss and the depth of her trauma. The stranger, dubbed Mr. Tuttle, is handicapped, unable to understand or communicate in language in any traditional way.

Fascinating in its focus on internal action, the reader must ultimately just accept the story for what it is while enjoying the glories of the meticulous prose, the acutely felt portrait of a woman grieving, the suggested symbolism in birds and nature, and the author's depiction of the ambiguities and uncertainties of life and time. This is a work which uses language in new ways, ultimately even calling into question the use of language itself to make sense of the world. Like Lauren, DeLillo himself is a performance artist. Mary Whipple
9 von 9 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen A good book for some 1. März 2004
Von Ein Kunde - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe
This is a not a dramatic book. This is a book that you read on a rainy afternoon in one sitting and bathe in the mood. The sentences are short at times, choppy and fragmented--a complaint made by the current "spot light reviewer". This is done for reason, for mood, and for effect. To some it may feel like a published experimental garbage-dump only gotten into print because of DeLillo's fantastic reputation. However, to read this book well you have to look at it as a whole.
The title, "The Body Artist", has as much bearing on this short work as the characters inside it. There is a backround of artistry, one of ambiguous interpretation not unlike those "new age" plays shown in the city. The book is light and dense at the same time; some of the sentences will strike you as odd and uneeded with no depth, while other scenes will captivate you with an overwhelming feeling of depression--hopefully lasting throughout the length of the novel. While I was reading, the book almost called for a scholarly analysis of theme and characterization: like I said, if read right the feeling of despair and eccentricity will seep into you. Read it with an artistic viewpoint and you'll be nicely rewarded.
11 von 13 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen A Low-Key but Contemplative Outing from DeLillo 29. März 2002
Von "50cent-haircut" - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch
After his sprawling 'Underworld', DeLillo wrote this whimsy of a book. But don't be fooled by the slimness of this volume... the themes of love, loss and death are probed as thoroughly and poetically as only DeLillo knows how.
Lauren's observations in the beginning are masterfully written. Everyday events and ritualistic details are written with an elliptical, but precise grace. It's a deliberate slowing down of the cognitive process (of Lauren's, and in turn, ours) to plumb the mysteries of what we commonly take as given.
Rey's death resounds throughout the book, and the weird stranger/ghost that inhabits the house is one of the most haunting characters/ideas I've read in recent years. Lauren's sense of loss, and the physical craving to fill such loss, such sorrow are expertly drawn, with unflinching emotional honesty.
It's a refreshing surprise to find that one of the most maximalist, post-modern fictioneers we have in America is also one of the more intricate miniaturists. Very impressive.
5 von 5 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen Strange and seductive novel, filled with ambiguities. 19. September 2005
Von Mary Whipple - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch
The Body Artist is one of the strangest--and most seductive--books I've read in a long time, a "ghost story" with a character who is described as if he were real, and whom the main character believes to be real, and who may, in fact, be real--but who may also be a figment of imagination. Events which are described as real may be fantasies, and even the relationships the main character has or has had with people who seem to be real may, in fact, be colored by wishful thinking. Ultimately, even the linear progression of the narrative itself is called into question since, DeLillo tells us, "Past, present, and future are not amenities of language."

The story begins with the intimately described minutiae of breakfast, as a couple, married just a short time, gets ready for the day. We learn that it takes two cycles on the toaster to get the bread the right color, that the cup is his and the paper is hers, that a blue jay comes to the bird feeder, that she puts soya on her cereal and that it smells like feet. When Rey Robles, the husband, dies later that day (something we know from the beginning), the world of the wife, Lauren Hartke, changes from one of communication and an outward focus to a world of grief and an inward focus. When she discovers a stranger living on the third floor of her rented house, we aren't sure whether he is real or whether he materializes to show Lauren's unresolved feelings about her loss and the depth of her trauma. The stranger, dubbed Mr. Tuttle, is handicapped, unable to understand or communicate in language in any traditional way.

Fascinating in its focus on internal action, the reader must ultimately just accept the story for what it is while enjoying the glories of the meticulous prose, the acutely felt portrait of a woman grieving, the suggested symbolism in birds and nature, and the author's depiction of the ambiguities and uncertainties of life and time. This is a work which uses language in new ways, ultimately even calling into question the use of language itself to make sense of the world. Like Lauren, DeLillo himself is a performance artist. Mary Whipple
6 von 7 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen How do you explain a ghost? 30. März 2006
Von Simon Cleveland - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch
"The Body Artist" by Don DeLillo is simply a rare escapade into the world of literary realism. There is so much harmony in this book that it I found it difficult to disassociate myself from the hypnotic force of its words.

The novel is a very comprehensive observation into the psyche of a lonely widow whose profession is to paint the reality of her feelings, emotions and experiences via her artistic skill - the capacity to manipulate her own body during performances during which she enacts her own personality as well as those of her dead husband and a ghost. But it really doesn't matter what the story is about and I can't stop repeating this ever since reading Franzen's "The Corrections". The realism of these highly effective magicians (DeLillo, Franzen, Auster) dubbed writers by the society, is so captivating that the only reason I pick up their books is to immerse myself in the pure texture of words. With these types of books there is no need to compose a thrill ride, or mystery, or some bizarre supernatural occurrence. There isn't a need because the construction of their works is supernatural itself. I may be sitting down, or laying down, or walking when I read or listen to these books, but I might just as well be blind, or a prisoner, or a king somewhere, it simply wouldn't matter, because every time I'm instantaneously transformed into a giant ear, a colossal eye, an infinite brain whose only task is to acquire and process, and feed on the beauty of their words. And so that's all. This book, like the rare few out there is a precious gem. It should be studied, it should be a required material in schools, it should be praised. I highly recommend it.

- by Simon Cleveland
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