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The Ancient Near East: A Very Short Introduction (Very Short Introductions) [Kindle Edition]

Amanda H. Podany
5.0 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (1 Kundenrezension)

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Produktbeschreibungen

Kurzbeschreibung

The ancient Near East is known as the "cradle of civilization"--and for good reason. Mesopotamia, Syria, and Anatolia were home to an extraordinarily rich and successful culture. Indeed, it was a time and place of earth-shaking changes for humankind: the beginnings of writing and law, kingship and bureaucracy, diplomacy and state-sponsored warfare, mathematics and literature.
This Very Short Introduction offers a fascinating account of this momentous time in human history. The three thousand years covered here--from around 3500 BCE, with the founding of the first Mesopotamian cities, to the conquest of the Near East by the Persian king Cyrus the Great in 539 BCE-represent a period of incredible innovation, from the invention of the wheel and the plow, to early achievements in astronomy, law, and diplomacy. As historian Amanda Podany explores this era, she overturns the popular image of the ancient world as a primitive, violent place. We discover that women had many rights and freedoms: they could own property, run businesses, and represent themselves in court. Diplomats traveled between the capital cities of major powers ensuring peace and friendship between the kings. Scribes and scholars studied the stars and could predict eclipses and the movements of the planets.
Every chapter introduces the reader to a particular moment in ancient Near Eastern history, illuminating such aspects as trade, religion, diplomacy, law, warfare, kingship, and agriculture. Each discussion focuses on evidence provided in two or three cuneiform texts from that time. These documents, the cities in which they were found, the people and gods named in them, the events they recount or reflect, all provide vivid testimony of the era in which they were written.
About the Series:
Oxford's Very Short Introductions series offers concise and original introductions to a wide range of subjects--from Islam to Sociology, Politics to Classics, Literary Theory to History, and Archaeology to the Bible. Not simply a textbook of definitions, each volume in this series provides trenchant and provocative--yet always balanced and complete--discussions of the central issues in a given discipline or field. Every Very Short Introduction gives a readable evolution of the subject in question, demonstrating how the subject has developed and how it has influenced society. Eventually, the series will encompass every major academic discipline, offering all students an accessible and abundant reference library. Whatever the area of study that one deems important or appealing, whatever the topic that fascinates the general reader, the Very Short Introductions series has a handy and affordable guide that will likely prove indispensable.

Über den Autor und weitere Mitwirkende

Amanda H. Podany is Professor and Chair of History at California State Polytechnic University, Pomona. She is the author of the award-winning book Brotherhood of Kings: How International Relations Shaped the Ancient Near East as well as a number of other books and articles on topics in ancient Near Eastern history.

Produktinformation

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • Dateigröße: 2395 KB
  • Seitenzahl der Print-Ausgabe: 168 Seiten
  • ISBN-Quelle für Seitenzahl: 0195377990
  • Verlag: Oxford University Press, USA (21. Oktober 2013)
  • Verkauf durch: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ASIN: B00IDA40VY
  • Text-to-Speech (Vorlesemodus): Aktiviert
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Nicht aktiviert
  • Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung: 5.0 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (1 Kundenrezension)
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: #185.562 Bezahlt in Kindle-Shop (Siehe Top 100 Bezahlt in Kindle-Shop)

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Format:Taschenbuch
At first I was really pleased with the title of this book. The term “Near East” has unfortunately fallen in disuse, and has been replaced with “Middle East,” which is traditionally a very different geographical area. However, the way term “Near East” is used in this book is not quite the way it’s been colloquially used either. The book basically covers the ancient Mesopotamia and its related cultures, and not, as I had expected, ancient Egypt, Persia and Israel. Apparently the way that archeologists and historians use this term is much narrower than what I had expected. I don’t have a problem with this per se, but this may cause confusion with many readers.

Having the issues of nomenclature out of the way, let me just say that this is a very fascinating book, especially if you are a fan of history. My understanding of this region and its ancient civilizations has been rather cursory, and I was pleasantly surprised to discover how rich and sophisticated this period of history was. It seems that of all the ancient civilizations this is the last one to be fully explored and understood, and was more or less completely unknown for thousands of years. However, thanks to the nature of its written records – cuneiform tablets – the written records of these civilizations that have been unearthed over the past century or so are extremely extensive and help us get a very detailed picture of this region in ancient times.

The book is written in chronological order, starting in about fourth millennium BC. It covers several major consecutive civilizations and periods that had arisen and fallen over the course of about three millennia. The final end of all of these civilizations and the cultures that sustained them came in sixth century BC with the Persian conquest by Cyrus the Great.
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Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen auf Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.1 von 5 Sternen  8 Rezensionen
14 von 15 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen Informative and Accessible Short Introduction to Ancient Mesopotamia 9. Januar 2014
Von Dr. Bojan Tunguz - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch|Verifizierter Kauf
At first I was really pleased with the title of this book. The term “Near East” has unfortunately fallen in disuse, and has been replaced with “Middle East,” which is traditionally a very different geographical area. However, the way term “Near East” is used in this book is not quite the way it’s been colloquially used either. The book basically covers the ancient Mesopotamia and its related cultures, and not, as I had expected, ancient Egypt, Persia and Israel. Apparently the way that archeologists and historians use this term is much narrower than what I had expected. I don’t have a problem with this per se, but this may cause confusion with many readers.

Having the issues of nomenclature out of the way, let me just say that this is a very fascinating book, especially if you are a fan of history. My understanding of this region and its ancient civilizations has been rather cursory, and I was pleasantly surprised to discover how rich and sophisticated this period of history was. It seems that of all the ancient civilizations this is the last one to be fully explored and understood, and was more or less completely unknown for thousands of years. However, thanks to the nature of its written records – cuneiform tablets – the written records of these civilizations that have been unearthed over the past century or so are extremely extensive and help us get a very detailed picture of this region in ancient times.

The book is written in chronological order, starting in about fourth millennium BC. It covers several major consecutive civilizations and periods that had arisen and fallen over the course of about three millennia. The final end of all of these civilizations and the cultures that sustained them came in sixth century BC with the Persian conquest by Cyrus the Great. The book covers many interesting topics: religion, language, trade, warfare, and the legal system. The ancient Babylonian Code of Hammurabi is one of the oldest preserved written documents, and perhaps the oldest legal code anywhere. After reading this short book it is even clearer how much all of the subsequent civilizations, and we moderns in particular, culturally owe to this ancient region and its civilizations.

The book is very clearly written and it’s very accessible. I enjoyed reading it and would recommend it to anyone interested in ancient history.
4 von 4 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen A compact gem 19. Juni 2014
Von M. W. S. Cawthorne - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch
Knowledge of Professor Podany's previous work on the region does not in any way detract from the insight and pleasure to be derived from this handy volume, which is just the job to fill in a plane journey or quiet evening and offers a balanced overview of the development of written records in the ancient near east from the earliest known times. It certainly lives up to its title as a Very Short Introduction, and leaves one hungry for more - not just for the ancient near east, but for other titles in the series.
5 von 6 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen A very short introduction to the murkiest 3,000 years of human history. 15. Mai 2014
Von Peter S. Bradley - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition|Verifizierter Kauf
This is a solid introduction and survey of the current state of archeological and historical knowledge concerning Near Eastern/Middle Eastern history and culture from prehistory to just short of the beginning of classical history. The books starts with the early development of Sumerian city states - when the term for king was not being used - and the early start of writing - when writing was essentially a "memory aid" - through successive eras of the 700 year "Uruk period" (circa 3600 BC to 2900 BC), the early dynastic period, the Akkadian Empire (2334 BC - 2194 BC), the Third Dynasty of Ur, the early Babylonian period, the early Assyrian period - when Assyria was treated like a bumptious upstart by the Hittite king - the Late Bronze Age - including its collapse - the neo-Assyrian Empire (973 BS - 612) - when the bumptious upstart became the sole remaining player of the Game of Kings - and the neo-Babylonian Empire (612 BC - 539 BC) - which was in turn brought law by the Medes.

Along the way, the author shares insight into cultural and technological developments including the development of writing and the institutions of kingship and empire. Language moves from eastern Sumerian to central Sumerian (Akkadian) to western Sumerian. (Amorite) as new people emerged and/or the locus of power shifted. The author touches on the literature of Sumeria, including Gilgamesh, the flood story of Utnapishtim, and Enlil's "Tablet of Destiny." I want to share the last because it is interesting and was touched on in Mark S. Smith's "The Origins of Biblical Monotheism: Israel's Polytheistic Background and the Ugaritic Texts:

//Order was maintained in the universe because the king of the gods possessed an object called the "Tablet of Destinies" on which were inscribed the me (pronounced "may"). These me were never written down on any earthly tablet, as far as we know, for human edification. But they encompassed all that kept chaos at bay. Humans were not significant enough, in the Mesopotamian view, to have any major role in cosmic events. It was neither here nor there to the gods what humans actually believed about them. They simply were. And just as the gods needed a king, so too did the humans. This was part of the cosmic order.

Podany, Amanda H. (2013-10-21). The Ancient Near East: A Very Short Introduction (Very Short Introductions) (Kindle Locations 521-526). Oxford University Press, USA. Kindle Edition.

Insofar as that was the case, one can see the "anti-pagan polemic" in the Old Testament's claim that humans were created in the image and likeness of God (albeit the Sumerians believed that men were created in the same shape as their gods, albeit that was a fact without significance.)

Clearly, the author's interest is directed to Mesopotamia. Egypt gets some mentions, such as its involvement in the cooperative era of the Late Bronze Age, when Egypt was willing to use cuneiform and clay tablets to communicate with her international allies. But the area outside of Mesopotamia is largely off-camera.

There is some overlap here with Eric Cline's 1177 B.C.: The Year Civilization Collapsed (Turning Points in Ancient History), for those with an interest in the mystery of the collapse of Late Bronze Age civilization.

The writing is clear and direct. I listened to this book mostly as an audiobook (as part of Kindle's "whispersync" program.) I found the writing and the subject to be sufficiently interesting to keep my attention as I was driving. Although the book tends to fall on the academic side, the "very short" format keeps the work focused and direct. I think that someone with an interest in "ancient" history would find this to be a worthy addition to their library.
4 von 6 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen I Now Have A Far Better Understanding Of the Ancient Near East 2. Januar 2014
Von Philippus Aureolus Theophrastus Bombastus von Hohenheim - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Taschenbuch|Verifizierter Kauf
Thanks to this wonderful book, "The Ancient Near East VSI", I now understand the Ancient Near East (ANE) far better than I used to. The book is a wonderful blend of high level scholarship and a very fine poetic perspective.

Studying the ANE is studying the basis for civilization and, consequently, the basis for much of the human condition. This book is the best I've encountered at making the subject easy to understand. It makes sense that a cuneiformist of the first order would write an extremely coherent book on the ANE as cuneiform writing is the key to understanding the various cultures (Sumerian, Babylonian, Assyrian, and Hittite).

If nothing else everyone should read the section on Sargon of Akkad ("To whom Enlil has given no rival; to him he (Enlil) gave the Upper and lower sea.") Sargon formed the worlds first empire out of city states and the guy was a hoot!

I put this book in the category of books that one should run out and buy and then drop everything and read it with enjoyment.
5.0 von 5 Sternen Lucid and fascinating 17. Juni 2014
Von Dror Burstein - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition|Verifizierter Kauf
One can really get a good impression about the differences of the succeeding cultures of Mesopotamia from this short text. It is a great starting point which will give you a clear sense of location on the complex timeline of these remote and important peoples. A great read.
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