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The Sun Also Rises
 
 

The Sun Also Rises [Kindle Edition]

Ernest Hemingway
3.9 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (173 Kundenrezensionen)

Kindle-Preis: EUR 5,88 Inkl. MwSt. und kostenloser drahtloser Lieferung über Amazon Whispernet

Weitere Ausgaben

Amazon-Preis Neu ab Gebraucht ab
Kindle Edition EUR 5,88  
Gebundene Ausgabe EUR 17,90  
Taschenbuch EUR 5,20  
Audio CD, Audiobook, Ungekürzte Ausgabe EUR 18,00  
Pappbilderbuch --  


Produktbeschreibungen

Amazon.de

The Sun Also Rises first appeared in 1926, and yet it's as fresh and clean and fine as it ever was, maybe finer. Hemingway's famously plain declarative sentences linger in the mind like poetry: "Brett was damned good-looking. She wore a slipover jersey sweater and a tweed skirt, and her hair was brushed back like a boy's. She started all that." His cast of thirtysomething dissolute expatriates--Brett and her drunken fiancé, Mike Campbell, the unhappy Princeton Jewish boxer Robert Cohn, the sardonic novelist Bill Gorton--are as familiar as the "cool crowd" we all once knew. No wonder this quintessential lost-generation novel has inspired several generations of imitators, in style as well as lifestyle.

Jake Barnes, Hemingway's narrator with a mysterious war wound that has left him sexually incapable, is the heart and soul of the book. Brett, the beautiful, doomed English woman he adores, provides the glamour of natural chic and sexual unattainability. Alcohol and post-World War I anomie fuel the plot: weary of drinking and dancing in Paris cafés, the expatriate gang decamps for the Spanish town of Pamplona for the "wonderful nightmare" of a week-long fiesta. Brett, with fiancé and ex-lover Cohn in tow, breaks hearts all around until she falls, briefly, for the handsome teenage bullfighter Pedro Romero. "My God! he's a lovely boy," she tells Jake. "And how I would love to see him get into those clothes. He must use a shoe-horn." Whereupon the party disbands.

But what's most shocking about the book is its lean, adjective-free style. The Sun Also Rises is Hemingway's masterpiece--one of them, anyway--and no matter how many times you've read it or how you feel about the manners and morals of the characters, you won't be able to resist its spell. This is a classic that really does live up to its reputation. --David Laskin

Amazon.com

The Sun Also Rises first appeared in 1926, and yet it's as fresh and clean and fine as it ever was, maybe finer. Hemingway's famously plain declarative sentences linger in the mind like poetry: "Brett was damned good-looking. She wore a slipover jersey sweater and a tweed skirt, and her hair was brushed back like a boy's. She started all that." His cast of thirtysomething dissolute expatriates--Brett and her drunken fiancé, Mike Campbell, the unhappy Princeton Jewish boxer Robert Cohn, the sardonic novelist Bill Gorton--are as familiar as the "cool crowd" we all once knew. No wonder this quintessential lost-generation novel has inspired several generations of imitators, in style as well as lifestyle.

Jake Barnes, Hemingway's narrator with a mysterious war wound that has left him sexually incapable, is the heart and soul of the book. Brett, the beautiful, doomed English woman he adores, provides the glamour of natural chic and sexual unattainability. Alcohol and post-World War I anomie fuel the plot: weary of drinking and dancing in Paris cafés, the expatriate gang decamps for the Spanish town of Pamplona for the "wonderful nightmare" of a week-long fiesta. Brett, with fiancé and ex-lover Cohn in tow, breaks hearts all around until she falls, briefly, for the handsome teenage bullfighter Pedro Romero. "My God! he's a lovely boy," she tells Jake. "And how I would love to see him get into those clothes. He must use a shoe-horn." Whereupon the party disbands.

But what's most shocking about the book is its lean, adjective-free style. The Sun Also Rises is Hemingway's masterpiece--one of them, anyway--and no matter how many times you've read it or how you feel about the manners and morals of the characters, you won't be able to resist its spell. This is a classic that really does live up to its reputation. --David Laskin


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8 von 8 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen The Space that Separates: The Two Sides of Conflict 30. Januar 2007
Von Donald Mitchell TOP 500 REZENSENT
Format:Taschenbuch
Why would anyone want to read a novel about unending drunken revels by emotional cripples who treat each other badly, never-ending love conflicts, getting excited by mayhem at the running of the bulls and during bull fights in Pamplona, and wasted lives? That's the question posed by this book.

The book will not draw too many readers for the subject matter. Why then does the book attract? Part of the appeal has to be the same reason that many people like horror films -- the relief you feel when you realize that your own life does not encounter such dangers can be profound.

Another reason to read this book is to understand the disillusionment of the American expatriates in Europe after World War I. The book is a period piece in this sense. Clearly, Hemingway is Jake and the book is undoubtedly very autobiographical. All first novels have that quality to some degree. Imagining how the author of The Old Man and the Sea started out as Jake was very interesting to me.

To me, however, the primary reason for reading this book is to encounter the remarkable structure that Hemingway built in his plot. He has created several different lenses through which we can explore the role of conflict and separation in our lives. Each lens turns out to be looking at the same object, and it is only by slowly focusing each of the lenses that we are able to see that object more clearly.

The central figure in the book is Brett, Lady Ashley, who enchants almost every man she meets, and who disengages from intimate relations with each one after permanently entangling him emotionally. That leaves a string of wounded suitors in her wake, including Jake. Things get tough when several of them join her and her fiance in Pamplona for the running of the bulls.
Lesen Sie weiter... ›
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9 von 10 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
4.0 von 5 Sternen A perfect example of American Modernism. 6. Dezember 2001
Von Ein Kunde
Format:Taschenbuch
Set in the flamboyant twenties, Hemingway's Fiesta: The Sun Also Rises switches from the raving parties and heavy drinking of urban Paris to the rural splendour of the Spanish mainland and the bloody spectacle of the bull fights. The emotionally charged friction, which sparks as personalities clash amongst a small group of expatriates, is mirrored by the intense passion emanating from the contest between man and beast.
The author portrays with remarkable but nonetheless efficacious simplicity the struggle between mankind and nature, between animal and human existence. Furthermore, Hemingway's novel characterises the mundane and materialistic essence of European post-war society, lucidly exhibiting the lost generation's repugnance of a world obsessed with wealth and devoid of idealism.
Fiesta: The Sun Also Rises marks a milestone in the career of one of America's most eminent writers. The novel serves as a perfect example of American modernist fiction.
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?
3 von 3 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen The Space that Separates: The Two Sides of Conflict 30. Januar 2007
Von Donald Mitchell TOP 500 REZENSENT
Format:Taschenbuch
Why would anyone want to read a novel about unending drunken revels by emotional cripples who treat each other badly, never-ending love conflicts, getting excited by mayhem at the running of the bulls and during bull fights in Pamplona, and wasted lives? That's the question posed by this book.

The book will not draw too many readers for the subject matter. Why then does the book attract? Part of the appeal has to be the same reason that many people like horror films -- the relief you feel when you realize that your own life does not encounter such dangers can be profound.

Another reason to read this book is to understand the disillusionment of the American expatriates in Europe after World War I. The book is a period piece in this sense. Clearly, Hemingway is Jake and the book is undoubtedly very autobiographical. All first novels have that quality to some degree. Imagining how the author of The Old Man and the Sea started out as Jake was very interesting to me.

To me, however, the primary reason for reading this book is to encounter the remarkable structure that Hemingway built in his plot. He has created several different lenses through which we can explore the role of conflict and separation in our lives. Each lens turns out to be looking at the same object, and it is only by slowly focusing each of the lenses that we are able to see that object more clearly.

The central figure in the book is Brett, Lady Ashley, who enchants almost every man she meets, and who disengages from intimate relations with each one after permanently entangling him emotionally. That leaves a string of wounded suitors in her wake, including Jake. Things get tough when several of them join her and her fiance in Pamplona for the running of the bulls.
Lesen Sie weiter... ›
War diese Rezension für Sie hilfreich?
3 von 3 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
5.0 von 5 Sternen The Space that Separates: The Two Sides of Conflict 19. September 2000
Von Donald Mitchell TOP 500 REZENSENT
Format:Gebundene Ausgabe
Why would anyone want to read a novel about unending drunken revels by emotional cripples who treat each other badly, never-ending love conflicts, getting excited by mayhem at the running of the bulls and during bull fights in Pamplona, and wasted lives? That's the question posed by this book.
The book will not draw too many readers for the subject matter. Why then does the book attract? Part of the appeal has to be the same reason that many people like horror films -- the relief you feel when you realize that your own life does not encounter such dangers can be profound.
Another reason to read this book is to understand the disillusionment of the American expatriates in Europe after World War I. The book is a period piece in this sense. Clearly, Hemingway is Jake and the book is undoubtedly very autobiographical. All first novels have that quality to some degree. Imagining how the author of The Old Man and the Sea started out as Jake was very interesting to me.
To me, however, the primary reason for reading this book is to encounter the remarkable structure that Hemingway built in his plot. He has created several different lenses through which we can explore the role of conflict and separation in our lives. Each lens turns out to be looking at the same object, and it is only by slowly focusing each of the lenses that we are able to see that object more clearly.
The central figure in the book is Brett, Lady Ashley, who enchants almost every man she meets, and who disengages from intimate relations with each one after permanently entangling him emotionally. That leaves a string of wounded suitors in her wake, including Jake. Things get tough when several of them join her and her fiance in Pamplona for the running of the bulls.
Lesen Sie weiter... ›
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Die neuesten Kundenrezensionen
1.0 von 5 Sternen Nur für Hardcore-Hemingway-Fans
Ehrlich gesagt ziemlich enttäuschend...
Hab das Buch nach ein paar Seiten wieder weggelegt, weil die Sprache für mich zu langweilig war. Lesen Sie weiter...
Vor 12 Monaten von Estrellita veröffentlicht
5.0 von 5 Sternen The Space that Separates: The Two Sides of Conflict
Why would anyone want to read a novel about unending drunken revels by emotional cripples who treat each other badly, never-ending love conflicts, getting excited by mayhem at the... Lesen Sie weiter...
Veröffentlicht am 21. Mai 2007 von Donald Mitchell
1.0 von 5 Sternen The Emperor is Wearing no Clothes
Let's start with the characters of the book. They drink beer, they eat, they smoke, they sip coffee, they chat, they sleep, and then they wake up and start the whole process over. Lesen Sie weiter...
Am 31. Juli 2000 veröffentlicht
5.0 von 5 Sternen An Important Part of the Twentieth Century Mindscape.
Hemingway captures the disillusionment of a generation jilted by the Great War. He captures the nuances, feel, and attitude of this "Lost Generation. Lesen Sie weiter...
Veröffentlicht am 20. Juli 2000 von Brendan
3.0 von 5 Sternen Lost Generation and Anti-Semitism
This book with its austere prose style is good read, and it's clear to me that Hemmingway, then 27 years old, shows tremendous talent. Lesen Sie weiter...
Veröffentlicht am 20. Juli 2000 von Mel B.
3.0 von 5 Sternen The 20th century "condition."
One of the most striking features of this novel is the bland superficiality of the characters. I found that I did not particularly like any of them, and that dampened my... Lesen Sie weiter...
Veröffentlicht am 16. Juli 2000 von D. Roberts
3.0 von 5 Sternen Needs a second read
I agree with the remarks of the reviewer a few spaces down- this could have been a wonderful short story or novella. I also kept wondering where the story was. Lesen Sie weiter...
Veröffentlicht am 12. Juli 2000 von Kenny L Parker
3.0 von 5 Sternen A surprisingly powerful aftermath
This didn't particularly impress me while reading it, then surprisingly left me with a deep sense of tragedy afterwards. Lesen Sie weiter...
Veröffentlicht am 7. Juli 2000 von Jane Pek
1.0 von 5 Sternen What the f--- was Hemingway smoking when he wrote this?
Hemingway is a great writer - this book does nothing but degrade, demote, and humiliate him. An undoubtedly horrible piece literature. Lesen Sie weiter...
Veröffentlicht am 5. Juli 2000 von Dr. Big Balls
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