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The Age of Capital: 1848-1875 (Englisch) Taschenbuch – 26. November 1996


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Produktinformation

  • Taschenbuch: 368 Seiten
  • Verlag: Vintage; Auflage: Vintage Books. (26. November 1996)
  • Sprache: Englisch
  • ISBN-10: 0679772545
  • ISBN-13: 978-0679772545
  • Größe und/oder Gewicht: 13,1 x 2 x 20,3 cm
  • Durchschnittliche Kundenbewertung: 4.0 von 5 Sternen  Alle Rezensionen anzeigen (2 Kundenrezensionen)
  • Amazon Bestseller-Rang: Nr. 37.294 in Fremdsprachige Bücher (Siehe Top 100 in Fremdsprachige Bücher)

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Produktbeschreibungen

Pressestimmen

What a book! For heaven's sake, and your own, read it! GUARDIAN 'Brilliantly conceived and equally brilliantly written' ASA BRIGGS 'Brilliant and wide ranging' AJP TAYLOR, OBSERVER 'Excellent' NEW STATESMAN 'A book filled with pleasures for the connoisseur and amateur alike' -- Dieser Text bezieht sich auf eine andere Ausgabe: Taschenbuch .

Synopsis

A major treatment of the crucial years 1848-1875 - a penetrating analysis of the rise of capitalism throught the world. In the 1860s a new word entered the economic and political vocabulary of the world: "capitalism". The global triumph of capitalism is the major theme of history in the decades after 1848. It was the triumph of a society which believed that economic growth rests on competitve private enterprise, on success in buying everything in the cheapest market (including labour) and selling it in the dearest. An economy so based, and therefore nestling naturally on the sound foundations of a bourgeoisie composed of those whom energy, merit and intelligence had raised to their position and kept there, would - it was believed - not only create a world of suitably distributed material plenty but of ever-growing enlightenment, reason and human opportunity, an advance of the sciences and the arts, in brief a world of continuous and accelerating material and moral progress. -- Dieser Text bezieht sich auf eine andere Ausgabe: Taschenbuch .

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Early in 1848 the eminent French political thinker Alexis de Tocqueville rose in the Chamber of Deputies to express sentiments which most Europeans shared: 'We are sleeping on a volcano...Do you not see that the earth trembles anew? Lesen Sie die erste Seite
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4 von 4 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von Ein Kunde am 6. September 1999
Format: Taschenbuch
name a single European event that happened between 1848 and 1875...quick! My guess is that a lot of non-Europeans would have a hard time with that one. Yet it was an astonishingly influential period, the time when both capitalism and imperialism became truly, irreversibly entrentched. Hobsbawm tells the tale masterfully. Reading the book, it's hard to believe he didn't actually live through this time himself. The book is a superb marriage of narrative with historical detail. Read it. Read all three.
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2 von 2 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich Von Gregory N. Hullender am 1. August 2000
Format: Taschenbuch
After the collapse of the Revolutions of 1848, Europe as a whole was pretty quiet until 1914. Economically, however, the period is divided by a serere economic downturn areound 1875. This book covers the first part of this period, when European and American Capitalism grew strong.
Since Hobsbawm is a Marxist, he's not much of a fan of this period, but his coverage of it is quite evenhanded and honest. Again, as in the first book, he's challenging to read, but worth the effort.
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Die hilfreichsten Kundenrezensionen auf Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 10 Rezensionen
15 von 17 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Our own Timelord 15. März 2011
Von Diziet - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch
The Age of Capital was originally the second part of a trilogy, flanked by The Age of Revolution: Europe, 1789-1848 and The Age of Empire, 1875-1914. Later the series became a tetralogy with the publication of Age of Extremes : The Short Twentieth Century 1914-1991.

Although each book stands up as a volume in it's own right it is very difficult, when finishing one, to not want to continue to find out 'what happens next' even if you know perfectly well what happens. And this is because, even though the books are not narratives in the normal sense of the term, the way Hobsbawm draws out the themes and events of each period really makes you want to find out how he is going to explain subsequent developments.

This volume, like the others in the series, is made up of more-or-less discreet essays on individual aspects of the period under consideration. Each subject is a chapter and the chapters are gathered together into three sections - Part 1: Revolutionary Prelude, Part 2: Developments and Part 3: Results. The chapters in Part 2 include The Great Boom, The World Unified, Conflicts and War, Building Nations, The Forces of Democracy, Losers, Winners and Changing Society. And then in Part 3, he looks at the effects of these developments.

Partly because of this structure but also partly because of the quality of the writing, it is a really interesting and illuminating read. So much of what we are living through today has its seeds in this and the previous period; to make any sense of the world today this is required reading.

There have been some criticism of Hobsbawm for being overtly Marxist in his outlook and theoretical basis. He says himself in his introduction:

"The historian cannot be objective about the period which is his subject. In this he differs (to his intellectual advantage) from its most typical ideologists, who believed that the progress of technology, 'positive science' and society made it possible to view their present with the unanswerable impartiality of the natural scientist, whose methods they believed (mistakenly) to understand. The author of this book cannot conceal a certain distaste, perhaps a certain contempt, for the age with which it deals, though one mitigated by admiration for its titanic material achievements and by the effort to understand even what he does not like. He does not share the nostalgic longing for the certainty, the self-confidence, of the mid-nineteenth-century bourgeois world which tempts many who look back upon it from the crisis-ridden western world a century later. His sympathies lie with those to whom few listened a century ago." (P17)

In the preface to this edition, he expands on these comments:

"This has been read by some as a declaration of intent to be unfair to the Victorian bourgeoisie and the age of its triumph. Since some people are evidently unable to read what is on the page, as distinct from what they think must be there, I would like to say clearly that this is not so. In fact, as at least one reviewer has correctly recognised, bourgeois triumph is not merely the organising principle of the present volume, but 'it is the bourgeoisie who receive much the most sympathetic treatment in the book'. For good or ill, it was their age, and I have tried to present it as such, even at the cost of - at least in this brief period - seeing other classes not so much in their own right, as in relation to it." (P11)

So leave your prejudices and pre-formed opinions at the door and read a remarkably inclusive, erudite and, above all, readable history of this formative period.
31 von 41 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
Brilliant Marxist Historiography! 20. Januar 2004
Von Ein Kunde - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch Verifizierter Kauf
Um, a few observations are in order. Firstly, Marx's critique of history, economics, and society must not be confused with the later activity of Lenin, Stalin, Mao, nor Ho Chi Min: just because they used Marx as their point of departure does in no way diminish Marx's project. Secondly, Hobsbawm is a Marxist historiographer--not a Marxist per se. Thirdly, the period 1848-75 witnessed some remarkably convulsive and important events: 1) the Crimean War [Britian burned on the Black Sea], 2) the Dano-Prussian War [Prussian victory at Düpple], 3) the Austro-Prussian War [Prussian victory at Sadowa], 4) German unification under Bismarck, and 5) the Franco-Prussian War which resulted in the spectacular German victory at Sedan, the collapse of the Second Empire, the Paris Commune, and the establishment of the Third Republic. Need we say more? Get the book.
34 von 47 Kunden fanden die folgende Rezension hilfreich
um 6. September 1999
Von Ein Kunde - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch
name a single European event that happened between 1848 and 1875...quick! My guess is that a lot of non-Europeans would have a hard time with that one. Yet it was an astonishingly influential period, the time when both capitalism and imperialism became truly, irreversibly entrentched. Hobsbawm tells the tale masterfully. Reading the book, it's hard to believe he didn't actually live through this time himself. The book is a superb marriage of narrative with historical detail. Read it. Read all three.
A Marxist historian writes a book that isn't boring 23. Mai 2014
Von Al Singh - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch Verifizierter Kauf
As a Marxist historian, Hobsbawm is obsessed with "bourgeois" culture, "bourgeois" art, "bourgeios" religion. He uses this term almost obsessively when discussing this period. This is not a tendentious work, but it is clearly colored by the author's class warrior instincts. But this is a fascinating book, as are all of Hobsbawm's historical works. Unlike most Marxists, and unlike Marx himself, Hobsbawn is not boring.
capital 5. Mai 2014
Von Richard I. Pervo - Veröffentlicht auf Amazon.com
Format: Taschenbuch
H. shows how to ask the big questions and seek not just to summarize events but to pursue causes. Few can match him. From the Marxist perspective this era was a necessary prelude to the coming age of socialism...H. stresses not only the growth of the proletariat and the end of the old rural world, secure and paternalistic, as well as oppressive and unchanging, but also the beginning of the formation of a global system, not fair and balanced at first, but global. He notes that bourgeois dominance led to the development of an artistic avant garde. (Wagner gets many barbs, as well as recognition.)
I do not know how this will read to those unfamiliar with general history. H. analyzes many events that he does not describe.
two shortcomings: The American Civil War. Had he read Nevins, e.g., H. would have recognized that the war greatly stimulated the growth of American industry. His observation that the C.S. had the best generals and the best armies indicates that his information is not good.
Religion: like many anti-religious, H. prefers religious people to be fundamentalists. Other than a clause devoted to Reform Judaism, he ignores the rise of critical study and liberal religion.
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